Senior councillor tells headteachers in Southend: back grammars or go elsewhere

Echo: Councillor: Back grammars or go elsewhere Councillor: Back grammars or go elsewhere

PRIMARY headteachers should not work in Southend if they oppose grammar schools on ideological grounds, a senior Tory councillor has said.

James Courtenay spoke out at a Southend Council meeting and urged heads to teach elsewhere if they did not want to send their pupils to selective schools.

He made the comments at the council’s people scrutiny committee, which discussed the falling number of Southend pupils being admitted to the town’s grammar schools.

Labour councillor David Norman had suggested some primary headteachers opposed grammar schools on “ideological grounds”.

Mr Courtenay, councillor responsible for education, said: “I would be happy to tell any headteacher to their face, in private, that if they don’t like grammar schools then they should not come to work in a borough where there are four grammar schools.”

Mr Norman, himself a governor and former grammar school pupil at Westcliff School for Boys, told the committee: “There are schools in the town where headteachers have shown themselves to be ideologically opposed to the 11-plus.

“One parent said, when she went to one particular school, she was told ‘If you want your child to go to grammar school, don’t send them here, send them to the school up the road.’ “That shows the scale of the work we have to do.”

Tory councillor Sally Carr suggested as many children as possible should be encouraged to sit the 11-plus.

A test tutor herself, she said she had been surprised many times by pupils’ results.

She said: “Having taught the 11-plus for 30 years, I can honestly say you never know how well a child is going to do.

“There are always ones you think ‘I don’t think so’ but they surprise you in the end.

“I’ve said to a parent ‘I think I’m wasting your money’ and, at the end of the day, the child got through.

“I hope the message to the headteachers is to encourage the children to take the exams as I don’t think anyone should be discouraged from it with the attitude that, if you pass, well done, but if you don’t, it doesn’t matter.

“Life is all about having a go and, if you don’t succeed in one area, you try again.”

Comments (21)

Please log in to enable comment sorting

12:56pm Mon 14 Apr 14

eurodoomed says...

Extreme left wing socialism, that has wrecked opportunity for generations of able children for the past 50 years in most parts of the country, is still rife amongst sections of the education establishment, and sadly, the Conservatives have been frightened to take them on for fear of being seen as "nasty." Even some senior Labour polioticians recognise the folly of the policy, such as Harriet Harman, who sent a child to a grammar school, and Shirley Williams, the disciple and successor as Education Secretary of the vile Anthony Crosland, (public school educated himself) who vowed "to destroy every ******* grammar school,",sent her child to one in a supreme act of hypocrisy..
Extreme left wing socialism, that has wrecked opportunity for generations of able children for the past 50 years in most parts of the country, is still rife amongst sections of the education establishment, and sadly, the Conservatives have been frightened to take them on for fear of being seen as "nasty." Even some senior Labour polioticians recognise the folly of the policy, such as Harriet Harman, who sent a child to a grammar school, and Shirley Williams, the disciple and successor as Education Secretary of the vile Anthony Crosland, (public school educated himself) who vowed "to destroy every ******* grammar school,",sent her child to one in a supreme act of hypocrisy.. eurodoomed
  • Score: 1

1:31pm Mon 14 Apr 14

Jack222 says...

Grammar schools are useless.

Education basically reflects home background- check the amount of free school meals children at a grammar school with the normal secondary school. The ratio is close to a tenth. The strongest predictor of how well a child does at school is home background.

AS well, you can get coaching for Grammar School tests - and middle class parents pay for that coaching. Working class children do not.

Check the official 'government added value' statistics for grammar Schools an they do very poorly when compared with normal government schools. Why? Grammar school students come in fully enriched from their wealthy backgrounds and DONT improve.

Finally, of course, compare Grarmmar School results with ONLY the top set result of the local school; that's a fairer comparison. Why? Grammar School reject the vast majority of those who apply, so they are like a top set in the local school (but more). To compare the results of the Grammar School with the local school is like comparing an apple with an orange.

Now abolish the grammar school tests and select solely based on properly applied IQ tests; that would be a much more interesting - and valid - approach...
Grammar schools are useless. Education basically reflects home background- check the amount of free school meals children at a grammar school with the normal secondary school. The ratio is close to a tenth. The strongest predictor of how well a child does at school is home background. AS well, you can get coaching for Grammar School tests - and middle class parents pay for that coaching. Working class children do not. Check the official 'government added value' statistics for grammar Schools an they do very poorly when compared with normal government schools. Why? Grammar school students come in fully enriched from their wealthy backgrounds and DONT improve. Finally, of course, compare Grarmmar School results with ONLY the top set result of the local school; that's a fairer comparison. Why? Grammar School reject the vast majority of those who apply, so they are like a top set in the local school (but more). To compare the results of the Grammar School with the local school is like comparing an apple with an orange. Now abolish the grammar school tests and select solely based on properly applied IQ tests; that would be a much more interesting - and valid - approach... Jack222
  • Score: -1

2:00pm Mon 14 Apr 14

Andycal 172D says...

I'll back Southend grammar schools as soon as the grammar schools start backing Southend. Whilst they draw from a catchment area covering most of Essex and half of East London yet draw valuable resources from the local area where they're situated they should be scrapped.

If Upminster parents want grammar school education for their children they should create them there.

Schools should serve the community in which they're located. That way they'd provide the best education for the children of the community that supports them.
I'll back Southend grammar schools as soon as the grammar schools start backing Southend. Whilst they draw from a catchment area covering most of Essex and half of East London yet draw valuable resources from the local area where they're situated they should be scrapped. If Upminster parents want grammar school education for their children they should create them there. Schools should serve the community in which they're located. That way they'd provide the best education for the children of the community that supports them. Andycal 172D
  • Score: 12

2:44pm Mon 14 Apr 14

saveDeanesschool says...

As 'working class', my child went to a 'comprehensive' secondary school and gained good enough exam grades to get into a grammar sixth form. Has my class gone up?
If they've got the aptitude and want to work hard, especially as they've earned a place on their own merit, they will do well whatever their background.
As 'working class', my child went to a 'comprehensive' secondary school and gained good enough exam grades to get into a grammar sixth form. Has my class gone up? If they've got the aptitude and want to work hard, especially as they've earned a place on their own merit, they will do well whatever their background. saveDeanesschool
  • Score: 11

4:25pm Mon 14 Apr 14

CarnMountification says...

saveDeanesschool wrote:
As 'working class', my child went to a 'comprehensive' secondary school and gained good enough exam grades to get into a grammar sixth form. Has my class gone up?
If they've got the aptitude and want to work hard, especially as they've earned a place on their own merit, they will do well whatever their background.
The exception can never become the rule, Comprehensives were brought about for the masses of working class, whilst the more prestigious Grammar schools, are fundamental in ensuring this countries wealth.
[quote][p][bold]saveDeanesschool[/bold] wrote: As 'working class', my child went to a 'comprehensive' secondary school and gained good enough exam grades to get into a grammar sixth form. Has my class gone up? If they've got the aptitude and want to work hard, especially as they've earned a place on their own merit, they will do well whatever their background.[/p][/quote]The exception can never become the rule, Comprehensives were brought about for the masses of working class, whilst the more prestigious Grammar schools, are fundamental in ensuring this countries wealth. CarnMountification
  • Score: -4

4:32pm Mon 14 Apr 14

jolllyboy says...

I know children from poor families who have done extremely well because they got to grammar school. The choice was that or a failing school - no choice. Work hard and the reward is there. however we must bear in mind that grammars do not suit everyone, children all have different talents and so the answer is to make the comprehensives a lot lot better to make an equal playing field.
I know children from poor families who have done extremely well because they got to grammar school. The choice was that or a failing school - no choice. Work hard and the reward is there. however we must bear in mind that grammars do not suit everyone, children all have different talents and so the answer is to make the comprehensives a lot lot better to make an equal playing field. jolllyboy
  • Score: 12

5:15pm Mon 14 Apr 14

Nebs says...

Andycal 172D wrote:
I'll back Southend grammar schools as soon as the grammar schools start backing Southend. Whilst they draw from a catchment area covering most of Essex and half of East London yet draw valuable resources from the local area where they're situated they should be scrapped.

If Upminster parents want grammar school education for their children they should create them there.

Schools should serve the community in which they're located. That way they'd provide the best education for the children of the community that supports them.
I tend to agree with you, except that there is no point sending a pupil to a grammar school if they are not going to be able to keep up.

About three quarters of the places available are reserved for children who attend local primary schools, but not enough local pupils make the grade and in the last few years two thirds of the places have gone to pupils outside the borough.

Simply put a clause in the heads contract that every assistance MUST be given to all pupils who aspire to attend a grammar school.
[quote][p][bold]Andycal 172D[/bold] wrote: I'll back Southend grammar schools as soon as the grammar schools start backing Southend. Whilst they draw from a catchment area covering most of Essex and half of East London yet draw valuable resources from the local area where they're situated they should be scrapped. If Upminster parents want grammar school education for their children they should create them there. Schools should serve the community in which they're located. That way they'd provide the best education for the children of the community that supports them.[/p][/quote]I tend to agree with you, except that there is no point sending a pupil to a grammar school if they are not going to be able to keep up. About three quarters of the places available are reserved for children who attend local primary schools, but not enough local pupils make the grade and in the last few years two thirds of the places have gone to pupils outside the borough. Simply put a clause in the heads contract that every assistance MUST be given to all pupils who aspire to attend a grammar school. Nebs
  • Score: 3

5:25pm Mon 14 Apr 14

Nebs says...

Found this, 11 plus results....

Exam Taken in 2012 for School places in Sept 2013
School Total Pass Fa
il
Blenheim Primary School 6 4 2
Bournemouth Park Primary School 11 4 7
Bournes Green Junior School 38 29 9
Chalkwell Hall Junior School 28 19 9
Darlinghurst Primary and Nursery School 6 3 3
Earls Hall Junior School 20 12 8
Eastwood Primary School 4 1 3
Edwards Hall Primary School 2 1 1
Fairways Primary School 8 5 3
Friars Primary School and Nursery 1 0 1
Hamstel Junior School 19 11 8
Heycroft Primary School 7 4 3
Hinguar Community Primary School 3 0 3
Leigh North Street Junior School 14 12 2
Milton Hall Primary School 18 6 12
Our Lady of Lourdes Catholic Primary School 20 14 6
Porters Grange Primary School and Nursery 8 0 8
Prince Avenue Primary Foundation School and Nursery 1 1 0
Richmond Primary School 0 0 0
Sacred Heart Catholic Primary School 7 5 2
St. George's Catholic Primary School 8 4 4
St. Helen's Catholic Primary School (Westcliff) 6 4 2
St. Mary's C of E Primary School Prittlewell 11 8 3
Temple Sutton Primary School 7 4 3
The Westborough School 12 2 10
Thorpe Greenways Junior School 23 11 12
Thorpedene Primary School 8 5 3
West Leigh Junior School 44 33 11

Source:
https://www.whatdoth
eyknow.com/request/1
1_results_southend_o
n_sea
Found this, 11 plus results.... Exam Taken in 2012 for School places in Sept 2013 School Total Pass Fa il Blenheim Primary School 6 4 2 Bournemouth Park Primary School 11 4 7 Bournes Green Junior School 38 29 9 Chalkwell Hall Junior School 28 19 9 Darlinghurst Primary and Nursery School 6 3 3 Earls Hall Junior School 20 12 8 Eastwood Primary School 4 1 3 Edwards Hall Primary School 2 1 1 Fairways Primary School 8 5 3 Friars Primary School and Nursery 1 0 1 Hamstel Junior School 19 11 8 Heycroft Primary School 7 4 3 Hinguar Community Primary School 3 0 3 Leigh North Street Junior School 14 12 2 Milton Hall Primary School 18 6 12 Our Lady of Lourdes Catholic Primary School 20 14 6 Porters Grange Primary School and Nursery 8 0 8 Prince Avenue Primary Foundation School and Nursery 1 1 0 Richmond Primary School 0 0 0 Sacred Heart Catholic Primary School 7 5 2 St. George's Catholic Primary School 8 4 4 St. Helen's Catholic Primary School (Westcliff) 6 4 2 St. Mary's C of E Primary School Prittlewell 11 8 3 Temple Sutton Primary School 7 4 3 The Westborough School 12 2 10 Thorpe Greenways Junior School 23 11 12 Thorpedene Primary School 8 5 3 West Leigh Junior School 44 33 11 Source: https://www.whatdoth eyknow.com/request/1 1_results_southend_o n_sea Nebs
  • Score: 1

5:32pm Mon 14 Apr 14

Devils Advocate says...

CarnMountification wrote:
saveDeanesschool wrote:
As 'working class', my child went to a 'comprehensive' secondary school and gained good enough exam grades to get into a grammar sixth form. Has my class gone up?
If they've got the aptitude and want to work hard, especially as they've earned a place on their own merit, they will do well whatever their background.
The exception can never become the rule, Comprehensives were brought about for the masses of working class, whilst the more prestigious Grammar schools, are fundamental in ensuring this countries wealth.
I would take issue with that snide statement. Firstly, do you dare to argue that the working classes have nothing to do with the money a country earns from its product? Their hard work and dedication have produced products that the world envied. Yes, "wealth" in its crudest terms is what so-called "Investors" get from their cut of the nations product, but the success of any country is the quality of its product. The nation blamed the workers for the failure of our car production but the reality is the "Investors" realised they had no clue how to modernise the cars they design, so instead moved their "investment" to Germany and Japan. From then on they did not want our car manufacturers to succeed.
On the other hand, look at France. With its trade unions and all the claptrap associated with the "Working Class" they are making some of the best cars in the world. Why pick on the working classes?
[quote][p][bold]CarnMountification[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]saveDeanesschool[/bold] wrote: As 'working class', my child went to a 'comprehensive' secondary school and gained good enough exam grades to get into a grammar sixth form. Has my class gone up? If they've got the aptitude and want to work hard, especially as they've earned a place on their own merit, they will do well whatever their background.[/p][/quote]The exception can never become the rule, Comprehensives were brought about for the masses of working class, whilst the more prestigious Grammar schools, are fundamental in ensuring this countries wealth.[/p][/quote]I would take issue with that snide statement. Firstly, do you dare to argue that the working classes have nothing to do with the money a country earns from its product? Their hard work and dedication have produced products that the world envied. Yes, "wealth" in its crudest terms is what so-called "Investors" get from their cut of the nations product, but the success of any country is the quality of its product. The nation blamed the workers for the failure of our car production but the reality is the "Investors" realised they had no clue how to modernise the cars they design, so instead moved their "investment" to Germany and Japan. From then on they did not want our car manufacturers to succeed. On the other hand, look at France. With its trade unions and all the claptrap associated with the "Working Class" they are making some of the best cars in the world. Why pick on the working classes? Devils Advocate
  • Score: 3

7:18pm Mon 14 Apr 14

Blind Haze says...

Andycal 172D wrote:
I'll back Southend grammar schools as soon as the grammar schools start backing Southend. Whilst they draw from a catchment area covering most of Essex and half of East London yet draw valuable resources from the local area where they're situated they should be scrapped.

If Upminster parents want grammar school education for their children they should create them there.

Schools should serve the community in which they're located. That way they'd provide the best education for the children of the community that supports them.
The grammar schools take 85% of their pupils from postcodes SS0 through to SS9.
[quote][p][bold]Andycal 172D[/bold] wrote: I'll back Southend grammar schools as soon as the grammar schools start backing Southend. Whilst they draw from a catchment area covering most of Essex and half of East London yet draw valuable resources from the local area where they're situated they should be scrapped. If Upminster parents want grammar school education for their children they should create them there. Schools should serve the community in which they're located. That way they'd provide the best education for the children of the community that supports them.[/p][/quote]The grammar schools take 85% of their pupils from postcodes SS0 through to SS9. Blind Haze
  • Score: 1

7:23pm Mon 14 Apr 14

profondo asbo says...

name and shame them, then marginalise or better still sack them. that would be how to deal with similar offences in the private sector.
name and shame them, then marginalise or better still sack them. that would be how to deal with similar offences in the private sector. profondo asbo
  • Score: 1

8:03pm Mon 14 Apr 14

A normal person says...

If the headteachers who disagree with the Grammar school system leave, please explain how this will improve the education of the children in Southend. Grammar schools intend to accommodate the academic top 10% of the population, where does this leave the 90% who the Grammar school system is irrelevant for? Where will the new experienced headteachers appear from? What will happen to the primary schools in the meantime? Please Mr councillor please enlighten us with the benefit of your Grammar school education and tell us how you think the primary schools can function if a number of vacancies suddenly occur at senior management level.
If the headteachers who disagree with the Grammar school system leave, please explain how this will improve the education of the children in Southend. Grammar schools intend to accommodate the academic top 10% of the population, where does this leave the 90% who the Grammar school system is irrelevant for? Where will the new experienced headteachers appear from? What will happen to the primary schools in the meantime? Please Mr councillor please enlighten us with the benefit of your Grammar school education and tell us how you think the primary schools can function if a number of vacancies suddenly occur at senior management level. A normal person
  • Score: -2

9:08pm Mon 14 Apr 14

profondo asbo says...

A normal person wrote:
If the headteachers who disagree with the Grammar school system leave, please explain how this will improve the education of the children in Southend. Grammar schools intend to accommodate the academic top 10% of the population, where does this leave the 90% who the Grammar school system is irrelevant for? Where will the new experienced headteachers appear from? What will happen to the primary schools in the meantime? Please Mr councillor please enlighten us with the benefit of your Grammar school education and tell us how you think the primary schools can function if a number of vacancies suddenly occur at senior management level.
aspire to something other than mediocrity.
[quote][p][bold]A normal person[/bold] wrote: If the headteachers who disagree with the Grammar school system leave, please explain how this will improve the education of the children in Southend. Grammar schools intend to accommodate the academic top 10% of the population, where does this leave the 90% who the Grammar school system is irrelevant for? Where will the new experienced headteachers appear from? What will happen to the primary schools in the meantime? Please Mr councillor please enlighten us with the benefit of your Grammar school education and tell us how you think the primary schools can function if a number of vacancies suddenly occur at senior management level.[/p][/quote]aspire to something other than mediocrity. profondo asbo
  • Score: 2

10:12pm Mon 14 Apr 14

SARFENDMAN says...

Not bothered either way so long as appropriate and fair funding goes to all all types of school with equally talented staff and kids get equal opportunities to succeed. It doesn't help if parents and kids feel 2nd rate if they don't get into a grammar school.
Not bothered either way so long as appropriate and fair funding goes to all all types of school with equally talented staff and kids get equal opportunities to succeed. It doesn't help if parents and kids feel 2nd rate if they don't get into a grammar school. SARFENDMAN
  • Score: 1

12:41am Tue 15 Apr 14

Andycal 172D says...

Blind Haze wrote:
Andycal 172D wrote:
I'll back Southend grammar schools as soon as the grammar schools start backing Southend. Whilst they draw from a catchment area covering most of Essex and half of East London yet draw valuable resources from the local area where they're situated they should be scrapped.

If Upminster parents want grammar school education for their children they should create them there.

Schools should serve the community in which they're located. That way they'd provide the best education for the children of the community that supports them.
The grammar schools take 85% of their pupils from postcodes SS0 through to SS9.
As you state 85% - not 100%

Why do children need to commute an hour each way every school day to attend school?

As for not enough local children "making the grade" and not being able to keep up, they won't keep up at all if they're not in the school and this approach takes no account of late developers who maybe improve later or of "burn outs" who over-achieve to get a place.

Give Southend's children the chance they deserve and stop trawling the rest of the county for pupils.
[quote][p][bold]Blind Haze[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Andycal 172D[/bold] wrote: I'll back Southend grammar schools as soon as the grammar schools start backing Southend. Whilst they draw from a catchment area covering most of Essex and half of East London yet draw valuable resources from the local area where they're situated they should be scrapped. If Upminster parents want grammar school education for their children they should create them there. Schools should serve the community in which they're located. That way they'd provide the best education for the children of the community that supports them.[/p][/quote]The grammar schools take 85% of their pupils from postcodes SS0 through to SS9.[/p][/quote]As you state 85% - not 100% Why do children need to commute an hour each way every school day to attend school? As for not enough local children "making the grade" and not being able to keep up, they won't keep up at all if they're not in the school and this approach takes no account of late developers who maybe improve later or of "burn outs" who over-achieve to get a place. Give Southend's children the chance they deserve and stop trawling the rest of the county for pupils. Andycal 172D
  • Score: 0

12:51am Tue 15 Apr 14

snorters2 says...

What's next Mr Courtenay?
"Back Conservatives or go elsewhere".
Mr Courtenay, on a turnout of 38% you gained 34% of the vote. That means 13% of the electorate voted for you. Hmmmmm.
What's next Mr Courtenay? "Back Conservatives or go elsewhere". Mr Courtenay, on a turnout of 38% you gained 34% of the vote. That means 13% of the electorate voted for you. Hmmmmm. snorters2
  • Score: 1

6:19am Tue 15 Apr 14

jayman says...

Tory hits out at hard Woking primary heads for not backing middle class institutions in abhorrent statement.

'The tory show is filmed infornt of a live, middle class audience.'

#claps#
Tory hits out at hard Woking primary heads for not backing middle class institutions in abhorrent statement. 'The tory show is filmed infornt of a live, middle class audience.' #claps# jayman
  • Score: -1

2:04pm Tue 15 Apr 14

Westcliff Warrior says...

It's great to see other (non-grammar) Secondaries improving massively but with so few local children passing the 11+ (It's more like 50% go from SS postcodes) the other reserved places at the grammars go to children outside the borough because local primaries and their parents are not getting children through the exam. The Echo had it right a few weeks ago. Aside from those who oppose grammars on ideological grounds, there are 3 reasons why local children are not passing. Poverty, lack of aspiration by parents and poor leadership in local primary schools. I would add two more; moving the exam to September and parents indulging their children with video games and things designed to turn their brains to mush.

It is good to see that the 11+ format is being changed to meet some of these concerns.

I went to one of the local grammars and have been living in London. We decided in June 2013 to put my son in for the September test, he did practice papers over the summer (no external coaching-just Mum and Dad), sat the 11+, got a huge pass and has a place at one of the grammar schools starting this September. I have aspirations for my children (for which I make no apology) and no, he's not going to commute. We are moving the whole family back to Southend this Summer and he's going to walk to school.

This is not a perfect system and there are problems to fix. And by the time my daughter sits the 11+ from a local primary, I hope they are.
It's great to see other (non-grammar) Secondaries improving massively but with so few local children passing the 11+ (It's more like 50% go from SS postcodes) the other reserved places at the grammars go to children outside the borough because local primaries and their parents are not getting children through the exam. The Echo had it right a few weeks ago. Aside from those who oppose grammars on ideological grounds, there are 3 reasons why local children are not passing. Poverty, lack of aspiration by parents and poor leadership in local primary schools. I would add two more; moving the exam to September and parents indulging their children with video games and things designed to turn their brains to mush. It is good to see that the 11+ format is being changed to meet some of these concerns. I went to one of the local grammars and have been living in London. We decided in June 2013 to put my son in for the September test, he did practice papers over the summer (no external coaching-just Mum and Dad), sat the 11+, got a huge pass and has a place at one of the grammar schools starting this September. I have aspirations for my children (for which I make no apology) and no, he's not going to commute. We are moving the whole family back to Southend this Summer and he's going to walk to school. This is not a perfect system and there are problems to fix. And by the time my daughter sits the 11+ from a local primary, I hope they are. Westcliff Warrior
  • Score: 0

3:15pm Tue 15 Apr 14

jayman says...

Westcliff Warrior wrote:
It's great to see other (non-grammar) Secondaries improving massively but with so few local children passing the 11+ (It's more like 50% go from SS postcodes) the other reserved places at the grammars go to children outside the borough because local primaries and their parents are not getting children through the exam. The Echo had it right a few weeks ago. Aside from those who oppose grammars on ideological grounds, there are 3 reasons why local children are not passing. Poverty, lack of aspiration by parents and poor leadership in local primary schools. I would add two more; moving the exam to September and parents indulging their children with video games and things designed to turn their brains to mush.

It is good to see that the 11+ format is being changed to meet some of these concerns.

I went to one of the local grammars and have been living in London. We decided in June 2013 to put my son in for the September test, he did practice papers over the summer (no external coaching-just Mum and Dad), sat the 11+, got a huge pass and has a place at one of the grammar schools starting this September. I have aspirations for my children (for which I make no apology) and no, he's not going to commute. We are moving the whole family back to Southend this Summer and he's going to walk to school.

This is not a perfect system and there are problems to fix. And by the time my daughter sits the 11+ from a local primary, I hope they are.
"I have aspirations for my children"

i recently asked my nine year old son if he would like to sit the 11+ exam. He looked at me inquisitively and said "no, what would i want to do that for!" (posed as affirmative statement not question"

My son has his own aspirations. Furthermore, he can make his own informed decisions.

further to James Courtenay's statement. I do wish someone would tap him on the shoulder and say "James my old boy, academy schools are self governing, not really part of your job to defend them as they are not in your portfolio"
[quote][p][bold]Westcliff Warrior[/bold] wrote: It's great to see other (non-grammar) Secondaries improving massively but with so few local children passing the 11+ (It's more like 50% go from SS postcodes) the other reserved places at the grammars go to children outside the borough because local primaries and their parents are not getting children through the exam. The Echo had it right a few weeks ago. Aside from those who oppose grammars on ideological grounds, there are 3 reasons why local children are not passing. Poverty, lack of aspiration by parents and poor leadership in local primary schools. I would add two more; moving the exam to September and parents indulging their children with video games and things designed to turn their brains to mush. It is good to see that the 11+ format is being changed to meet some of these concerns. I went to one of the local grammars and have been living in London. We decided in June 2013 to put my son in for the September test, he did practice papers over the summer (no external coaching-just Mum and Dad), sat the 11+, got a huge pass and has a place at one of the grammar schools starting this September. I have aspirations for my children (for which I make no apology) and no, he's not going to commute. We are moving the whole family back to Southend this Summer and he's going to walk to school. This is not a perfect system and there are problems to fix. And by the time my daughter sits the 11+ from a local primary, I hope they are.[/p][/quote]"I have aspirations for my children" i recently asked my nine year old son if he would like to sit the 11+ exam. He looked at me inquisitively and said "no, what would i want to do that for!" (posed as affirmative statement not question" My son has his own aspirations. Furthermore, he can make his own informed decisions. further to James Courtenay's statement. I do wish someone would tap him on the shoulder and say "James my old boy, academy schools are self governing, not really part of your job to defend them as they are not in your portfolio" jayman
  • Score: -1

8:16pm Tue 15 Apr 14

Westcliff Warrior says...

I really hope your lad has his own aspirations but your comment reminded me of when my parents asked if I wanted to learn a musical instrument. Hmm. Bit hard that, lots of practice needed. So I said "not really". Always regretted that. Plus if children at local schools never see a cohort going off to the grammars why would they want to take the 11+?
I really hope your lad has his own aspirations but your comment reminded me of when my parents asked if I wanted to learn a musical instrument. Hmm. Bit hard that, lots of practice needed. So I said "not really". Always regretted that. Plus if children at local schools never see a cohort going off to the grammars why would they want to take the 11+? Westcliff Warrior
  • Score: 0

10:47pm Fri 18 Apr 14

Blind Haze says...

Andycal 172D wrote:
Blind Haze wrote:
Andycal 172D wrote:
I'll back Southend grammar schools as soon as the grammar schools start backing Southend. Whilst they draw from a catchment area covering most of Essex and half of East London yet draw valuable resources from the local area where they're situated they should be scrapped.

If Upminster parents want grammar school education for their children they should create them there.

Schools should serve the community in which they're located. That way they'd provide the best education for the children of the community that supports them.
The grammar schools take 85% of their pupils from postcodes SS0 through to SS9.
As you state 85% - not 100%

Why do children need to commute an hour each way every school day to attend school?

As for not enough local children "making the grade" and not being able to keep up, they won't keep up at all if they're not in the school and this approach takes no account of late developers who maybe improve later or of "burn outs" who over-achieve to get a place.

Give Southend's children the chance they deserve and stop trawling the rest of the county for pupils.
St Thomas More and St Bernard's do the same but for different reasons. Do you suggest they take the same mantra and take all of their pupils from this same area too?

Primary schools in this area don't gear the children towards the 11+. Back when I took it in the early 90s, everyone from the class did during the school day. Nowadays it's ignored and you even have to go to take your child to a secondary school at the weekend to take it. This results in a minority actually taking the 'entrance exam'.

Is it any wonder that secondary schools need to go further afield to fill their classrooms?
[quote][p][bold]Andycal 172D[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Blind Haze[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Andycal 172D[/bold] wrote: I'll back Southend grammar schools as soon as the grammar schools start backing Southend. Whilst they draw from a catchment area covering most of Essex and half of East London yet draw valuable resources from the local area where they're situated they should be scrapped. If Upminster parents want grammar school education for their children they should create them there. Schools should serve the community in which they're located. That way they'd provide the best education for the children of the community that supports them.[/p][/quote]The grammar schools take 85% of their pupils from postcodes SS0 through to SS9.[/p][/quote]As you state 85% - not 100% Why do children need to commute an hour each way every school day to attend school? As for not enough local children "making the grade" and not being able to keep up, they won't keep up at all if they're not in the school and this approach takes no account of late developers who maybe improve later or of "burn outs" who over-achieve to get a place. Give Southend's children the chance they deserve and stop trawling the rest of the county for pupils.[/p][/quote]St Thomas More and St Bernard's do the same but for different reasons. Do you suggest they take the same mantra and take all of their pupils from this same area too? Primary schools in this area don't gear the children towards the 11+. Back when I took it in the early 90s, everyone from the class did during the school day. Nowadays it's ignored and you even have to go to take your child to a secondary school at the weekend to take it. This results in a minority actually taking the 'entrance exam'. Is it any wonder that secondary schools need to go further afield to fill their classrooms? Blind Haze
  • Score: 0

Comments are closed on this article.

click2find

About cookies

We want you to enjoy your visit to our website. That's why we use cookies to enhance your experience. By staying on our website you agree to our use of cookies. Find out more about the cookies we use.

I agree