Schools close as snow falls in South Essex

First published in News

SCHOOLS in South Essex have closed for the day as snow continues to fall and cause road and traffic disruption.

South Benfleet Primary School and Jotmans Hall Primary School have both closed, together with Seevic College and Eastwood Academy in Southend.

The children at The King John School in Thundersley watched a film before being sent home for the day.

In Rayleigh, Fitzwimarc School closed as parents and staff struggled to negotiate the High Road leading up from the Weir to the town.

Willow School in Basildon and Mayflower School in Billericay have also closed.

The advice to parents has been to contact the school directly where most have recorded messages of their intention to close or remain open.

Many schools operate a round robin email for parents now notifying them of any closures.

To speak to the Echo newsroom call 01268 469379.

Comments (40)

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10:36am Wed 5 Dec 12

black jack ketchum says...

How flipping stupid!
How flipping stupid! black jack ketchum
  • Score: 0

10:37am Wed 5 Dec 12

Eric Whim says...

weren't we treated to a story some time back about how the Council were ready for the weather and had tons of rock salt piled up somewhere?

Perhaps their staff's drives were frozen so they couldn't get to the depot to get the gritter out...
weren't we treated to a story some time back about how the Council were ready for the weather and had tons of rock salt piled up somewhere? Perhaps their staff's drives were frozen so they couldn't get to the depot to get the gritter out... Eric Whim
  • Score: 0

11:19am Wed 5 Dec 12

alimac69 says...

Limehouse station tells commuters to be careful due to adverse weather conditions. Been telling us that for over a week now; we've got sun up here today.
Limehouse station tells commuters to be careful due to adverse weather conditions. Been telling us that for over a week now; we've got sun up here today. alimac69
  • Score: 0

12:01pm Wed 5 Dec 12

Woodenspoon says...

No wonder the education has gone to pot in this country!! Closing schools just because a little bit of snow falls. Next year they will close every time it rains.
I wonder how they manage to cope in places that have snow for 3 months or more of the year?
Kingdoms are ruled by Kings, Empires ruled by Emperors and Countries ruled by C**..... Need I say more?
No wonder the education has gone to pot in this country!! Closing schools just because a little bit of snow falls. Next year they will close every time it rains. I wonder how they manage to cope in places that have snow for 3 months or more of the year? Kingdoms are ruled by Kings, Empires ruled by Emperors and Countries ruled by C**..... Need I say more? Woodenspoon
  • Score: 0

12:09pm Wed 5 Dec 12

Olivia2847 says...

Eric Whim wrote:
weren't we treated to a story some time back about how the Council were ready for the weather and had tons of rock salt piled up somewhere?

Perhaps their staff's drives were frozen so they couldn't get to the depot to get the gritter out...
The school management decide whether or not the schools open sunshine. Many teachers will battle in regardless as they are more professional that you think!
[quote][p][bold]Eric Whim[/bold] wrote: weren't we treated to a story some time back about how the Council were ready for the weather and had tons of rock salt piled up somewhere? Perhaps their staff's drives were frozen so they couldn't get to the depot to get the gritter out...[/p][/quote]The school management decide whether or not the schools open sunshine. Many teachers will battle in regardless as they are more professional that you think! Olivia2847
  • Score: 0

12:11pm Wed 5 Dec 12

Nebs says...

Olivia2847 wrote:
Eric Whim wrote:
weren't we treated to a story some time back about how the Council were ready for the weather and had tons of rock salt piled up somewhere?

Perhaps their staff's drives were frozen so they couldn't get to the depot to get the gritter out...
The school management decide whether or not the schools open sunshine. Many teachers will battle in regardless as they are more professional that you think!
No work, no pay.
[quote][p][bold]Olivia2847[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Eric Whim[/bold] wrote: weren't we treated to a story some time back about how the Council were ready for the weather and had tons of rock salt piled up somewhere? Perhaps their staff's drives were frozen so they couldn't get to the depot to get the gritter out...[/p][/quote]The school management decide whether or not the schools open sunshine. Many teachers will battle in regardless as they are more professional that you think![/p][/quote]No work, no pay. Nebs
  • Score: 0

12:16pm Wed 5 Dec 12

Eric Whim says...

Olivia2847 wrote:
Eric Whim wrote:
weren't we treated to a story some time back about how the Council were ready for the weather and had tons of rock salt piled up somewhere?

Perhaps their staff's drives were frozen so they couldn't get to the depot to get the gritter out...
The school management decide whether or not the schools open sunshine. Many teachers will battle in regardless as they are more professional that you think!
the staff I refer to are the gritter drivers
[quote][p][bold]Olivia2847[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Eric Whim[/bold] wrote: weren't we treated to a story some time back about how the Council were ready for the weather and had tons of rock salt piled up somewhere? Perhaps their staff's drives were frozen so they couldn't get to the depot to get the gritter out...[/p][/quote]The school management decide whether or not the schools open sunshine. Many teachers will battle in regardless as they are more professional that you think![/p][/quote]the staff I refer to are the gritter drivers Eric Whim
  • Score: 0

1:02pm Wed 5 Dec 12

Doris70 says...

Woodenspoon wrote:
No wonder the education has gone to pot in this country!! Closing schools just because a little bit of snow falls. Next year they will close every time it rains.
I wonder how they manage to cope in places that have snow for 3 months or more of the year?
Kingdoms are ruled by Kings, Empires ruled by Emperors and Countries ruled by C**..... Need I say more?
Schools do not want to close but they are left with little choice if most of the staff are unable to get in because of the road conditions - and I don't just mean the snow, I'm talking about gridlocked roads. A shool cannot be run with only a handful of staff. And don't forget; a lot of teachers are parents too, if their own children have been sent home then they have to collect them just like 'normal' people!
[quote][p][bold]Woodenspoon[/bold] wrote: No wonder the education has gone to pot in this country!! Closing schools just because a little bit of snow falls. Next year they will close every time it rains. I wonder how they manage to cope in places that have snow for 3 months or more of the year? Kingdoms are ruled by Kings, Empires ruled by Emperors and Countries ruled by C**..... Need I say more?[/p][/quote]Schools do not want to close but they are left with little choice if most of the staff are unable to get in because of the road conditions - and I don't just mean the snow, I'm talking about gridlocked roads. A shool cannot be run with only a handful of staff. And don't forget; a lot of teachers are parents too, if their own children have been sent home then they have to collect them just like 'normal' people! Doris70
  • Score: 0

1:12pm Wed 5 Dec 12

emcee says...

Doris70 wrote:
Woodenspoon wrote:
No wonder the education has gone to pot in this country!! Closing schools just because a little bit of snow falls. Next year they will close every time it rains.
I wonder how they manage to cope in places that have snow for 3 months or more of the year?
Kingdoms are ruled by Kings, Empires ruled by Emperors and Countries ruled by C**..... Need I say more?
Schools do not want to close but they are left with little choice if most of the staff are unable to get in because of the road conditions - and I don't just mean the snow, I'm talking about gridlocked roads. A shool cannot be run with only a handful of staff. And don't forget; a lot of teachers are parents too, if their own children have been sent home then they have to collect them just like 'normal' people!
Its not a case of whether school staff are "able" to get to work, its about how many look out of their window in the morning, see a bit of white and rub their hands together with glee at the excuse of yet another day off.
[quote][p][bold]Doris70[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Woodenspoon[/bold] wrote: No wonder the education has gone to pot in this country!! Closing schools just because a little bit of snow falls. Next year they will close every time it rains. I wonder how they manage to cope in places that have snow for 3 months or more of the year? Kingdoms are ruled by Kings, Empires ruled by Emperors and Countries ruled by C**..... Need I say more?[/p][/quote]Schools do not want to close but they are left with little choice if most of the staff are unable to get in because of the road conditions - and I don't just mean the snow, I'm talking about gridlocked roads. A shool cannot be run with only a handful of staff. And don't forget; a lot of teachers are parents too, if their own children have been sent home then they have to collect them just like 'normal' people![/p][/quote]Its not a case of whether school staff are "able" to get to work, its about how many look out of their window in the morning, see a bit of white and rub their hands together with glee at the excuse of yet another day off. emcee
  • Score: 0

1:16pm Wed 5 Dec 12

bongking says...

need roads salted, and then maybe people can get to work, i live in rayleigh, and work in witham, the A130, this morning was so bad, it had taken me 2 hours to get to work! when it only takes me normally 30 mins, GET THE ROADS SALTED!!!
need roads salted, and then maybe people can get to work, i live in rayleigh, and work in witham, the A130, this morning was so bad, it had taken me 2 hours to get to work! when it only takes me normally 30 mins, GET THE ROADS SALTED!!! bongking
  • Score: 0

1:28pm Wed 5 Dec 12

emcee says...

This whole situation about schools closing after the smallest dusting of snow is becoming pathetic. If it was "that" bad why did ALL schools not close?
Secondly, headteachers should be made to forward a full report, forwarding it to the LEA (and then the Dept of Education), explaining their decisions to close the school, including explaining any assumptions why they thought staff attendance would be low. Also, all staff who did not attempt to attend (if said school had not already been put on notice of closure) should also report their reasons to the LEA and any found that were local enough to walk or could easily reach the school by other means should have pay docked and issued a formal written warning.
The system as it stands makes it too easy for schools to close and staff to be able to use the flimsiest of excuses not to attend.
This whole situation about schools closing after the smallest dusting of snow is becoming pathetic. If it was "that" bad why did ALL schools not close? Secondly, headteachers should be made to forward a full report, forwarding it to the LEA (and then the Dept of Education), explaining their decisions to close the school, including explaining any assumptions why they thought staff attendance would be low. Also, all staff who did not attempt to attend (if said school had not already been put on notice of closure) should also report their reasons to the LEA and any found that were local enough to walk or could easily reach the school by other means should have pay docked and issued a formal written warning. The system as it stands makes it too easy for schools to close and staff to be able to use the flimsiest of excuses not to attend. emcee
  • Score: 0

1:48pm Wed 5 Dec 12

AnotherSister says...

During the frigid, long, freezing winter of 1962/1963, us kids still went to school. There were some transport problems, but people just got on with life and didn't make a drama out of what is a normal winter occurrence in the UK - snow!
During the frigid, long, freezing winter of 1962/1963, us kids still went to school. There were some transport problems, but people just got on with life and didn't make a drama out of what is a normal winter occurrence in the UK - snow! AnotherSister
  • Score: 0

1:56pm Wed 5 Dec 12

maxell says...

three car accident at stambridge primary school today raod closed by police, sutton road acciedents, lorry stuck on warners, bus stuck ashingdon hill accident on nestuda way latests doughnut, brays lane heavey road works, if your a teacher in this lot you may well go back to bed , I was out and the roads were extremly hazzadus only 15 mins after the snow started to fall, I did learn something though, when snow flakes become larger its a sign the the cloud is empty. same as the gritter trucks it would seem.
three car accident at stambridge primary school today raod closed by police, sutton road acciedents, lorry stuck on warners, bus stuck ashingdon hill accident on nestuda way latests doughnut, brays lane heavey road works, if your a teacher in this lot you may well go back to bed , I was out and the roads were extremly hazzadus only 15 mins after the snow started to fall, I did learn something though, when snow flakes become larger its a sign the the cloud is empty. same as the gritter trucks it would seem. maxell
  • Score: 0

2:52pm Wed 5 Dec 12

meretty says...

With regards to teachers just looking out of the window, seeing snow and deciding not to go to work, that is ridiculous! I am a teacher and left for work this morning only to have an accident due to the poor state of the roads. I have spoken to other staff who battled for 3-4 hours to get to work due to grid locked roads and icy conditions. My school did manage to stay open but schools can only stay open if there are enough staff to supervise the children and if this is not possible the school has to close due to health and safety reasons. If the council did their job properly and gritted the roads then schools would be able to remain open, snow was predicted for heavens sake, even if the quanity did take us a little by surprise!
With regards to teachers just looking out of the window, seeing snow and deciding not to go to work, that is ridiculous! I am a teacher and left for work this morning only to have an accident due to the poor state of the roads. I have spoken to other staff who battled for 3-4 hours to get to work due to grid locked roads and icy conditions. My school did manage to stay open but schools can only stay open if there are enough staff to supervise the children and if this is not possible the school has to close due to health and safety reasons. If the council did their job properly and gritted the roads then schools would be able to remain open, snow was predicted for heavens sake, even if the quanity did take us a little by surprise! meretty
  • Score: 0

3:41pm Wed 5 Dec 12

Audioman says...

Half inch of snow and the whole county
comes to a stand still.
Council get your fingers out and GRIT
the roads if you have any that is.
Half inch of snow and the whole county comes to a stand still. Council get your fingers out and GRIT the roads if you have any that is. Audioman
  • Score: 0

4:29pm Wed 5 Dec 12

Antonius says...

It's truly unbelievable the way schools close at the drop of a hat.

A lot of the young kids were out playing in it anyway.
It's truly unbelievable the way schools close at the drop of a hat. A lot of the young kids were out playing in it anyway. Antonius
  • Score: 0

4:33pm Wed 5 Dec 12

Antonius says...

AnotherSister wrote:
During the frigid, long, freezing winter of 1962/1963, us kids still went to school. There were some transport problems, but people just got on with life and didn't make a drama out of what is a normal winter occurrence in the UK - snow!
Too true, but that was when we all used to walk. Nobody was driven to school, most of the teachers lived locally, and children went to their nearest school.
[quote][p][bold]AnotherSister[/bold] wrote: During the frigid, long, freezing winter of 1962/1963, us kids still went to school. There were some transport problems, but people just got on with life and didn't make a drama out of what is a normal winter occurrence in the UK - snow![/p][/quote]Too true, but that was when we all used to walk. Nobody was driven to school, most of the teachers lived locally, and children went to their nearest school. Antonius
  • Score: 0

5:21pm Wed 5 Dec 12

notalazyteacher says...

I am a teacher. I walked to work today. I arrived on time. I stayed after the children were sent home. It wasn't my decision to send them, by the way; teachers don't get to make that decision, head teachers do. I left when the school buildings were locked up. I took marking and admin home. Students have emailed me work during the afternoon and I have marked it and offered them feedback. I don't expect praise for this; it is my job and I am paid to do it. But I am sick to the back teeth of crass statements accusing teachers in general of not wanting to work.
I am a teacher. I walked to work today. I arrived on time. I stayed after the children were sent home. It wasn't my decision to send them, by the way; teachers don't get to make that decision, head teachers do. I left when the school buildings were locked up. I took marking and admin home. Students have emailed me work during the afternoon and I have marked it and offered them feedback. I don't expect praise for this; it is my job and I am paid to do it. But I am sick to the back teeth of crass statements accusing teachers in general of not wanting to work. notalazyteacher
  • Score: 0

5:27pm Wed 5 Dec 12

Nebs says...

An emergency plan, whereby teachers unable to get to their place of work should report to the nearest school, would see more of the schools kept open.
An emergency plan, whereby teachers unable to get to their place of work should report to the nearest school, would see more of the schools kept open. Nebs
  • Score: 0

5:48pm Wed 5 Dec 12

tricklesthegreek says...

our school did not close. There was no need to. I did call off our journey to the swimming pool - not because of the heavy (ha!) snow, but because the traffic was so bad in our area the children would have spent most of the time in the coach and not in the pool which is not the general idea of a swimming lesson. Asides from that we all got on as normal, went out in the afternoon for ten minutes at the end of the day so we could do some science around insulation and then went off home/stayed to do marking and sort out tomorrow. Schools should only close if they can't get staff physically in to school. Some of our staff were late but not one turned around and said 'can't be bothered'.
@Nebs - there is an unofficial rule that that can take place but unfortunately CRB and safeguarding issues require that each school performs its own CRB on teaching staff before they are allowed to be left unattended. Daft really, but I understand because safeguarding is a top priority. It should be we can turn up with CRBs, our ID and a phonecall from the headteacher to confirm we are in current employment at the school and away we go as supply teachers for the day.
our school did not close. There was no need to. I did call off our journey to the swimming pool - not because of the heavy (ha!) snow, but because the traffic was so bad in our area the children would have spent most of the time in the coach and not in the pool which is not the general idea of a swimming lesson. Asides from that we all got on as normal, went out in the afternoon for ten minutes at the end of the day so we could do some science around insulation and then went off home/stayed to do marking and sort out tomorrow. Schools should only close if they can't get staff physically in to school. Some of our staff were late but not one turned around and said 'can't be bothered'. @Nebs - there is an unofficial rule that that can take place but unfortunately CRB and safeguarding issues require that each school performs its own CRB on teaching staff before they are allowed to be left unattended. Daft really, but I understand because safeguarding is a top priority. It should be we can turn up with CRBs, our ID and a phonecall from the headteacher to confirm we are in current employment at the school and away we go as supply teachers for the day. tricklesthegreek
  • Score: 0

5:52pm Wed 5 Dec 12

tricklesthegreek says...

meretty wrote:
With regards to teachers just looking out of the window, seeing snow and deciding not to go to work, that is ridiculous! I am a teacher and left for work this morning only to have an accident due to the poor state of the roads. I have spoken to other staff who battled for 3-4 hours to get to work due to grid locked roads and icy conditions. My school did manage to stay open but schools can only stay open if there are enough staff to supervise the children and if this is not possible the school has to close due to health and safety reasons. If the council did their job properly and gritted the roads then schools would be able to remain open, snow was predicted for heavens sake, even if the quanity did take us a little by surprise!
Meretty, I hope you are okay after your accident.
I entirely agree with you - a story a couple of weeks back said 'we are ready for any adverse weather conditions'. Ahem. FAIL.
Us teachers will unfortunately always get stick - we are in a profession where we are damned if we do, damned if we don't. Don't rise to it. Just go in, do our jobs and know that WE are going to work when some others from ALL professions (including ours) will see a bit of snow as an excuse for a day off.
My cousin in Canada who is also a teacher finds this all extremely amusing. Her answer? Buy a snow mobile.
[quote][p][bold]meretty[/bold] wrote: With regards to teachers just looking out of the window, seeing snow and deciding not to go to work, that is ridiculous! I am a teacher and left for work this morning only to have an accident due to the poor state of the roads. I have spoken to other staff who battled for 3-4 hours to get to work due to grid locked roads and icy conditions. My school did manage to stay open but schools can only stay open if there are enough staff to supervise the children and if this is not possible the school has to close due to health and safety reasons. If the council did their job properly and gritted the roads then schools would be able to remain open, snow was predicted for heavens sake, even if the quanity did take us a little by surprise![/p][/quote]Meretty, I hope you are okay after your accident. I entirely agree with you - a story a couple of weeks back said 'we are ready for any adverse weather conditions'. Ahem. FAIL. Us teachers will unfortunately always get stick - we are in a profession where we are damned if we do, damned if we don't. Don't rise to it. Just go in, do our jobs and know that WE are going to work when some others from ALL professions (including ours) will see a bit of snow as an excuse for a day off. My cousin in Canada who is also a teacher finds this all extremely amusing. Her answer? Buy a snow mobile. tricklesthegreek
  • Score: 0

5:55pm Wed 5 Dec 12

meretty says...

notalazyteacher wrote:
I am a teacher. I walked to work today. I arrived on time. I stayed after the children were sent home. It wasn't my decision to send them, by the way; teachers don't get to make that decision, head teachers do. I left when the school buildings were locked up. I took marking and admin home. Students have emailed me work during the afternoon and I have marked it and offered them feedback. I don't expect praise for this; it is my job and I am paid to do it. But I am sick to the back teeth of crass statements accusing teachers in general of not wanting to work.
I totally agree. Once I arrived home after my accident I spent the rest of the day doing school work and marking work which my sixth form were emailing me. I have just finished working. I am fed up with people blaming teachers so situations which are completely out of our control!
[quote][p][bold]notalazyteacher[/bold] wrote: I am a teacher. I walked to work today. I arrived on time. I stayed after the children were sent home. It wasn't my decision to send them, by the way; teachers don't get to make that decision, head teachers do. I left when the school buildings were locked up. I took marking and admin home. Students have emailed me work during the afternoon and I have marked it and offered them feedback. I don't expect praise for this; it is my job and I am paid to do it. But I am sick to the back teeth of crass statements accusing teachers in general of not wanting to work.[/p][/quote]I totally agree. Once I arrived home after my accident I spent the rest of the day doing school work and marking work which my sixth form were emailing me. I have just finished working. I am fed up with people blaming teachers so situations which are completely out of our control! meretty
  • Score: 0

6:06pm Wed 5 Dec 12

Doris70 says...

emcee wrote:
Doris70 wrote:
Woodenspoon wrote:
No wonder the education has gone to pot in this country!! Closing schools just because a little bit of snow falls. Next year they will close every time it rains.
I wonder how they manage to cope in places that have snow for 3 months or more of the year?
Kingdoms are ruled by Kings, Empires ruled by Emperors and Countries ruled by C**..... Need I say more?
Schools do not want to close but they are left with little choice if most of the staff are unable to get in because of the road conditions - and I don't just mean the snow, I'm talking about gridlocked roads. A shool cannot be run with only a handful of staff. And don't forget; a lot of teachers are parents too, if their own children have been sent home then they have to collect them just like 'normal' people!
Its not a case of whether school staff are "able" to get to work, its about how many look out of their window in the morning, see a bit of white and rub their hands together with glee at the excuse of yet another day off.
Idiot!
[quote][p][bold]emcee[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Doris70[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Woodenspoon[/bold] wrote: No wonder the education has gone to pot in this country!! Closing schools just because a little bit of snow falls. Next year they will close every time it rains. I wonder how they manage to cope in places that have snow for 3 months or more of the year? Kingdoms are ruled by Kings, Empires ruled by Emperors and Countries ruled by C**..... Need I say more?[/p][/quote]Schools do not want to close but they are left with little choice if most of the staff are unable to get in because of the road conditions - and I don't just mean the snow, I'm talking about gridlocked roads. A shool cannot be run with only a handful of staff. And don't forget; a lot of teachers are parents too, if their own children have been sent home then they have to collect them just like 'normal' people![/p][/quote]Its not a case of whether school staff are "able" to get to work, its about how many look out of their window in the morning, see a bit of white and rub their hands together with glee at the excuse of yet another day off.[/p][/quote]Idiot! Doris70
  • Score: 0

6:41pm Wed 5 Dec 12

jolllyboy says...

Gritting the pedestrian bridges seems to be putting a lump of sand in the middle of the step and hope people move it around for them.
Gritting the pedestrian bridges seems to be putting a lump of sand in the middle of the step and hope people move it around for them. jolllyboy
  • Score: 0

7:06pm Wed 5 Dec 12

kev1956in says...

Why is it when we get a little snow all you see is schools closed.You do not see Tesco closed, Fords closed,garden centre closed etc.
Why is it when we get a little snow all you see is schools closed.You do not see Tesco closed, Fords closed,garden centre closed etc. kev1956in
  • Score: 0

7:24pm Wed 5 Dec 12

Olivia2847 says...

notalazyteacher wrote:
I am a teacher. I walked to work today. I arrived on time. I stayed after the children were sent home. It wasn't my decision to send them, by the way; teachers don't get to make that decision, head teachers do. I left when the school buildings were locked up. I took marking and admin home. Students have emailed me work during the afternoon and I have marked it and offered them feedback. I don't expect praise for this; it is my job and I am paid to do it. But I am sick to the back teeth of crass statements accusing teachers in general of not wanting to work.
Exactly Miss! As I have been told off by Noddy today I have to be on my best behaviour! Many teachers have used Sykpe today for example ...
[quote][p][bold]notalazyteacher[/bold] wrote: I am a teacher. I walked to work today. I arrived on time. I stayed after the children were sent home. It wasn't my decision to send them, by the way; teachers don't get to make that decision, head teachers do. I left when the school buildings were locked up. I took marking and admin home. Students have emailed me work during the afternoon and I have marked it and offered them feedback. I don't expect praise for this; it is my job and I am paid to do it. But I am sick to the back teeth of crass statements accusing teachers in general of not wanting to work.[/p][/quote]Exactly Miss! As I have been told off by Noddy today I have to be on my best behaviour! Many teachers have used Sykpe today for example ... Olivia2847
  • Score: 0

7:25pm Wed 5 Dec 12

Saarfend Lass says...

kev1956in wrote:
Why is it when we get a little snow all you see is schools closed.You do not see Tesco closed, Fords closed,garden centre closed etc.
BECAUSE all those places you have mentioned do not have adult to children ratio which they have to work by, BY LAW.

I remember working at the old Woolie's in Southend Highstreet with only a handful of staff when it snowed, however a school would not be allowed by law to operate with 200+ children when they only have a hand full of staff.
[quote][p][bold]kev1956in[/bold] wrote: Why is it when we get a little snow all you see is schools closed.You do not see Tesco closed, Fords closed,garden centre closed etc.[/p][/quote]BECAUSE all those places you have mentioned do not have adult to children ratio which they have to work by, BY LAW. I remember working at the old Woolie's in Southend Highstreet with only a handful of staff when it snowed, however a school would not be allowed by law to operate with 200+ children when they only have a hand full of staff. Saarfend Lass
  • Score: 0

7:36pm Wed 5 Dec 12

kev1956in says...

Saarfend Lass wrote:
kev1956in wrote:
Why is it when we get a little snow all you see is schools closed.You do not see Tesco closed, Fords closed,garden centre closed etc.
BECAUSE all those places you have mentioned do not have adult to children ratio which they have to work by, BY LAW.

I remember working at the old Woolie's in Southend Highstreet with only a handful of staff when it snowed, however a school would not be allowed by law to operate with 200+ children when they only have a hand full of staff.
when you worked at Woolies with a handful of staff i presume the rest were at home looking after their kids because the schools were shut.
[quote][p][bold]Saarfend Lass[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]kev1956in[/bold] wrote: Why is it when we get a little snow all you see is schools closed.You do not see Tesco closed, Fords closed,garden centre closed etc.[/p][/quote]BECAUSE all those places you have mentioned do not have adult to children ratio which they have to work by, BY LAW. I remember working at the old Woolie's in Southend Highstreet with only a handful of staff when it snowed, however a school would not be allowed by law to operate with 200+ children when they only have a hand full of staff.[/p][/quote]when you worked at Woolies with a handful of staff i presume the rest were at home looking after their kids because the schools were shut. kev1956in
  • Score: 0

7:42pm Wed 5 Dec 12

Saarfend Lass says...

kev1956in wrote:
Saarfend Lass wrote:
kev1956in wrote:
Why is it when we get a little snow all you see is schools closed.You do not see Tesco closed, Fords closed,garden centre closed etc.
BECAUSE all those places you have mentioned do not have adult to children ratio which they have to work by, BY LAW.

I remember working at the old Woolie's in Southend Highstreet with only a handful of staff when it snowed, however a school would not be allowed by law to operate with 200+ children when they only have a hand full of staff.
when you worked at Woolies with a handful of staff i presume the rest were at home looking after their kids because the schools were shut.
nope from what i remember it was either a school holiday or weekend... as I wasn't meant to be working but was called in because i lived walking distance away.
[quote][p][bold]kev1956in[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Saarfend Lass[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]kev1956in[/bold] wrote: Why is it when we get a little snow all you see is schools closed.You do not see Tesco closed, Fords closed,garden centre closed etc.[/p][/quote]BECAUSE all those places you have mentioned do not have adult to children ratio which they have to work by, BY LAW. I remember working at the old Woolie's in Southend Highstreet with only a handful of staff when it snowed, however a school would not be allowed by law to operate with 200+ children when they only have a hand full of staff.[/p][/quote]when you worked at Woolies with a handful of staff i presume the rest were at home looking after their kids because the schools were shut.[/p][/quote]nope from what i remember it was either a school holiday or weekend... as I wasn't meant to be working but was called in because i lived walking distance away. Saarfend Lass
  • Score: 0

7:44pm Wed 5 Dec 12

Saarfend Lass says...

Saarfend Lass wrote:
kev1956in wrote:
Saarfend Lass wrote:
kev1956in wrote:
Why is it when we get a little snow all you see is schools closed.You do not see Tesco closed, Fords closed,garden centre closed etc.
BECAUSE all those places you have mentioned do not have adult to children ratio which they have to work by, BY LAW.

I remember working at the old Woolie's in Southend Highstreet with only a handful of staff when it snowed, however a school would not be allowed by law to operate with 200+ children when they only have a hand full of staff.
when you worked at Woolies with a handful of staff i presume the rest were at home looking after their kids because the schools were shut.
nope from what i remember it was either a school holiday or weekend... as I wasn't meant to be working but was called in because i lived walking distance away.
I was still in 6th form when i worked there.
[quote][p][bold]Saarfend Lass[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]kev1956in[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Saarfend Lass[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]kev1956in[/bold] wrote: Why is it when we get a little snow all you see is schools closed.You do not see Tesco closed, Fords closed,garden centre closed etc.[/p][/quote]BECAUSE all those places you have mentioned do not have adult to children ratio which they have to work by, BY LAW. I remember working at the old Woolie's in Southend Highstreet with only a handful of staff when it snowed, however a school would not be allowed by law to operate with 200+ children when they only have a hand full of staff.[/p][/quote]when you worked at Woolies with a handful of staff i presume the rest were at home looking after their kids because the schools were shut.[/p][/quote]nope from what i remember it was either a school holiday or weekend... as I wasn't meant to be working but was called in because i lived walking distance away.[/p][/quote]I was still in 6th form when i worked there. Saarfend Lass
  • Score: 0

10:39pm Wed 5 Dec 12

emcee says...

notalazyteacher wrote:
I am a teacher. I walked to work today. I arrived on time. I stayed after the children were sent home. It wasn't my decision to send them, by the way; teachers don't get to make that decision, head teachers do. I left when the school buildings were locked up. I took marking and admin home. Students have emailed me work during the afternoon and I have marked it and offered them feedback. I don't expect praise for this; it is my job and I am paid to do it. But I am sick to the back teeth of crass statements accusing teachers in general of not wanting to work.
Good for you but I can assure you that for every teacher that will make such an effort there will be many more that won't. I have worked in education for many years and have had close contact with teaching staff and I know for a fact that an awful lot of teachers will, if they can get away with it, do as little as possible for as much as possible.
[quote][p][bold]notalazyteacher[/bold] wrote: I am a teacher. I walked to work today. I arrived on time. I stayed after the children were sent home. It wasn't my decision to send them, by the way; teachers don't get to make that decision, head teachers do. I left when the school buildings were locked up. I took marking and admin home. Students have emailed me work during the afternoon and I have marked it and offered them feedback. I don't expect praise for this; it is my job and I am paid to do it. But I am sick to the back teeth of crass statements accusing teachers in general of not wanting to work.[/p][/quote]Good for you but I can assure you that for every teacher that will make such an effort there will be many more that won't. I have worked in education for many years and have had close contact with teaching staff and I know for a fact that an awful lot of teachers will, if they can get away with it, do as little as possible for as much as possible. emcee
  • Score: 0

11:07pm Wed 5 Dec 12

woolstone says...

Don't you just get fed up with people always having a go at teachers because the schools are closed due to snow. It is quite obvious that they do not understand how decision are made and by who. The safety of the children has priority, you cannot have a school full of children with only a handful of staff. Teachers do not always live near the school they teach at and can have a long journey before they reach school normally, so bad weather causes problems outside their control, maybe people expect them to sleep at the school when we have bad weather so schools stay open never mind their own families.
Maybe it would be more useful if people had more helpful suggestions than keep blaming teachers as to how to keep schools open.
No I am not a teacher.
Don't you just get fed up with people always having a go at teachers because the schools are closed due to snow. It is quite obvious that they do not understand how decision are made and by who. The safety of the children has priority, you cannot have a school full of children with only a handful of staff. Teachers do not always live near the school they teach at and can have a long journey before they reach school normally, so bad weather causes problems outside their control, maybe people expect them to sleep at the school when we have bad weather so schools stay open never mind their own families. Maybe it would be more useful if people had more helpful suggestions than keep blaming teachers as to how to keep schools open. No I am not a teacher. woolstone
  • Score: 0

11:54pm Wed 5 Dec 12

Steve H says...

Why are people blaming the council for not gritting???

I live and work along the A127 and have seen gritter after gritter passing by.

The gritters will only spread on major routes, it is impossible to grit EVERY road.

Also, once the road has been gritted and then driven over by many 100's or 1000's of vehicles, that grit becomes useless.

Stop blaming the gritters and start looking at the driving styles of those who have had accidents.

As for schools being closed, shame on the headteachers who made those descisions today.
Why are people blaming the council for not gritting??? I live and work along the A127 and have seen gritter after gritter passing by. The gritters will only spread on major routes, it is impossible to grit EVERY road. Also, once the road has been gritted and then driven over by many 100's or 1000's of vehicles, that grit becomes useless. Stop blaming the gritters and start looking at the driving styles of those who have had accidents. As for schools being closed, shame on the headteachers who made those descisions today. Steve H
  • Score: 0

9:29am Thu 6 Dec 12

Antonius says...

As I said before.....

If the safety of the children is the main concern, why is it that it's ok for them to go out playing in the snow and ice, but not for them to go to school ?

Head teachers being paranoid about being sued, is a nonsense.
As I said before..... If the safety of the children is the main concern, why is it that it's ok for them to go out playing in the snow and ice, but not for them to go to school ? Head teachers being paranoid about being sued, is a nonsense. Antonius
  • Score: 0

8:57pm Thu 6 Dec 12

City Zen says...

I feel many parents would soon complain if an accident occurred in a school which was under-staffed due to weather conditions. Also, there is the problem of pupils throwing ice lumps at each other and causing nasty facial injuries and the stairs being awash with melted snow from boots etc. Sadly, we live in a huge 'blame' culture.
I feel many parents would soon complain if an accident occurred in a school which was under-staffed due to weather conditions. Also, there is the problem of pupils throwing ice lumps at each other and causing nasty facial injuries and the stairs being awash with melted snow from boots etc. Sadly, we live in a huge 'blame' culture. City Zen
  • Score: 0

3:06pm Fri 7 Dec 12

Antonius says...

We always seem to have managed in the past when teachers were absent.

I think the "blame culture" card is over played. It is all too often used as an excuse nowadays.

Lots of Urban Myths too.
We always seem to have managed in the past when teachers were absent. I think the "blame culture" card is over played. It is all too often used as an excuse nowadays. Lots of Urban Myths too. Antonius
  • Score: 0

4:39pm Sat 8 Dec 12

Aint it just the truth says...

AnotherSister wrote:
During the frigid, long, freezing winter of 1962/1963, us kids still went to school. There were some transport problems, but people just got on with life and didn't make a drama out of what is a normal winter occurrence in the UK - snow!
This is not true! I was at school in the 50s and 60s and the schools often closed on the first day or two of snow as the teachers couldn't get in and if the school doesn't have enough teachers to supervise the kids they have no choice but to close. As the Council gritters got out and cleared the roads the teachers could get into school and the schools re-opened. This is what happened in the winter of 62/3, many schools closed for the first day or two of snow but managed to open on subsequent days. Some people's memories of childhood are seen through rose tinted spectacles.
[quote][p][bold]AnotherSister[/bold] wrote: During the frigid, long, freezing winter of 1962/1963, us kids still went to school. There were some transport problems, but people just got on with life and didn't make a drama out of what is a normal winter occurrence in the UK - snow![/p][/quote]This is not true! I was at school in the 50s and 60s and the schools often closed on the first day or two of snow as the teachers couldn't get in and if the school doesn't have enough teachers to supervise the kids they have no choice but to close. As the Council gritters got out and cleared the roads the teachers could get into school and the schools re-opened. This is what happened in the winter of 62/3, many schools closed for the first day or two of snow but managed to open on subsequent days. Some people's memories of childhood are seen through rose tinted spectacles. Aint it just the truth
  • Score: 0

10:10pm Sat 8 Dec 12

muffindamule says...

What are we going to do when the winter weather arrives ?
What are we going to do when the winter weather arrives ? muffindamule
  • Score: 0

6:14pm Sun 9 Dec 12

echoforum says...

going to school or jeremy kyle
nuff said!!!!!!!!
going to school or jeremy kyle nuff said!!!!!!!! echoforum
  • Score: 0

10:18am Thu 20 Dec 12

DCLEIGH says...

Odd isn't it....that the 2 Southend Grammar Schools seldom close.
Odd isn't it....that the 2 Southend Grammar Schools seldom close. DCLEIGH
  • Score: 0

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