Families put forward gardens for Daws Heath archaeology dig

Probing the past - Rod Turner, of Hadleigh and Thundersley Community Archive, Terry Barclay and Tony Manning from Ages Archaeology and dig volunteers outside St Michael's Church, Daws Heath

Probing the past - Rod Turner, of Hadleigh and Thundersley Community Archive, Terry Barclay and Tony Manning from Ages Archaeology and dig volunteers outside St Michael's Church, Daws Heath

First published in News

FIFTEEN potential sites have been indentified for an archaeological dig to unearth the history of Daws Heath.

Enthusiastic families in Daws Heath Road, Bramble Road, Western Road, Haresland Close and Bramble Hall Lane have put forward their gardens as potential sites to help uncover the town’s forgotten past.

Between 10 and 15 pits will be created on June 5 and 6 in the hope archaeologists will discover hidden historical relics beneath the soil.

Terry Barclay, the local co-ordinator working on behalf of the Hadleigh and Thundersley Community Archive, said: “We are very excited by the amount of responses we have had. We really hope people will enjoy the event and enjoying seeing what’s involved.

“It is the first chance we have had to participant in a proper dig so we are all looking forward to it immensely. Hopefully we will discover something exciting. We’re keeping our fingers crossed it won’t be pouring with rain.”

The congregation of St Michael’s Church, in Daws Heath Road has also put forward some of its land for the dig so that members of the community can come along and watch the drama unfold.

Reverend Marian Sturrock said: “I think it is a wonderful idea. People like to know not just their own roots, but the roots of the community where they live. Being in the centre of Daws Heath we thought it would be lovely to get involved and provide a site for people to come along and watch.

“I hope to be down there as often as I can I’m quite interested to find out what they have discovered and what ideas they have about how Daws Heath came to be what it is now.”

Plans are also in the pipeline to hold a small exhibition on the history of Daws Heath at the church, and the allow members of the public to view any relics found in the dig at the church.

Experts from Cambridge University, including former Time Team presenter Carenza Lewis , will be carrying out the two-day excavation alongside the Hadleigh and Thundersley Community Archive and Hadleigh-based Ages Archaeology and History Association.

Forty gifted and talent students from Southend High School for Boys, Southend High School for Girls, Shoeburyness High School and Cecil Jones College, will be also taking part in the project.

Any historical findings uncovered will be sent to the university for analysis, with the information forwarded to Community Archive.

For more information on the dig, e-mail hadleighhistory@gmail.com or visit www.arch.cam.ac.uk

Have you put forward your garden for the dig? If so contact Jackie McMillan at the newsroom on 01268 469435.

Comments (2)

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11:53am Wed 17 Apr 13

John T Pharro says...

Great idea, but seems a shame that local gifted and talented children from local schools could not be used. Were the local schools asked to take part? Before the usual posters put their usual derogatory comments in, yes there are gifted and talented children in the local schools.
Great idea, but seems a shame that local gifted and talented children from local schools could not be used. Were the local schools asked to take part? Before the usual posters put their usual derogatory comments in, yes there are gifted and talented children in the local schools. John T Pharro
  • Score: 1

9:41pm Wed 17 Apr 13

InTheKnowOk says...

Daws Heath was the haunt of thieves and smugglers back in the mid late 19th Century where contraband was taken from Hadleigh Castle via Leigh Creek back to Daws Heath

There is also a burial ground at the triangular shaped piece of ground by St Michael's Church, and another burial ground at the junction of Daws Heath and Western Road, this site was used for non Christian's and waifs and strays.

Being interested in this, I for one hope they find something to tell us a little more of the history of Hadleigh.
Daws Heath was the haunt of thieves and smugglers back in the mid late 19th Century where contraband was taken from Hadleigh Castle via Leigh Creek back to Daws Heath There is also a burial ground at the triangular shaped piece of ground by St Michael's Church, and another burial ground at the junction of Daws Heath and Western Road, this site was used for non Christian's and waifs and strays. Being interested in this, I for one hope they find something to tell us a little more of the history of Hadleigh. InTheKnowOk
  • Score: 0

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