Safety fears after care home check

A CARE home has been ordered to improve after concerns were raised about the safety of elderly residents.

During a routine visit to Goldenley in Richmond Avenue, Benfleet, inspectors found patient records did not reflect their care needs, staff did not engage with residents and equipment was unsafe.

The care home has been told it needs to improve two essential standards – care and welfare of people who use the service and the safety, availability and suitability of equipment.

During the visit the Care Quality Commission inspectors discovered staff refused patients requests to go outside for some fresh air, and made decisions for them.

Wheelchairs, which had missing footplates, were not taken out of operation and pressure mattresses were not checked daily as required.

The commission has ordered Goldenley to write a report setting out what steps it will take.

A spokeswoman for the health watchdog said: “We found that before people received care or treatment they were asked for their consent and the provider acted in accordance with their wishes.

“Where people did not have capacity to consent, the provider acted in accordance with legal requirements.

“However, we found that care and treatment was not planned and delivered in a way intended to ensure people's safety and welfare.

“We looked at the nutritional needs of people and found people were protected from the risks of inadequate nutrition and dehydration.

“Health, safety and welfare was also protected when more than one provider was involved in their care and treatment, or when they moved between different services.

This was because the provider worked in cooperation with others.

“However, we found people were not protected from unsafe or unsuitable equipment.”

Goldenley was found to be meeting three out of five essential standards consent to care and treatment, meeting nutritional needs and co-perating with other providers.

The 40-bedroom home specialises in dementia care.

Management at the Goldenley home refused to comment when approached by the Echo.

Comments (8)

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7:31am Wed 15 Jan 14

Nowthatsworthknowing says...

There will always be hiccups with any inspection, lends itself to warranting the existence of such a group of examiners.
They should try to see the bigger picture, without this private nursing home, where would the residents be? Basildon Hospital ??
There will always be hiccups with any inspection, lends itself to warranting the existence of such a group of examiners. They should try to see the bigger picture, without this private nursing home, where would the residents be? Basildon Hospital ?? Nowthatsworthknowing
  • Score: 1

9:37am Wed 15 Jan 14

Kim Gandy says...

As somebody who knows I can address all of the above in one word: management.

Grasping greedy care home owners who think more of looking after their shareholders and management than their residents and staff.

Most of the above issues are a direct result, in my experience, of not having enough staff and resources.

The average shift in a care home starts at 7am and ends after lunch with the second shift of the day starting after lunch and going on till mid evening. Often carers will work both shifts to make ends meet and are tired and exhausted.

They often report things like missing footplates to management and nothing gets done. They don't have time to check everything as they are running around after their residents, helping them with eating and the toilet and bathing and everyday stuff like that which in the end, leaves little or no time for anything else. On top of that they are forced to write out reams and reams of paperwork and are shouted down if all these things are not done.

Bullying and blame culture are rife and management rarely listens to staff, obsessed as management are, with box ticking.

Very little time is given over for activities either as staff often do not have time and an activities coordinator will be hard pressed to handle all the activities totally on their own. It's good when other staff can join in but this is not often.

I am basing my opinion on my personal experience of care homes, not the one above - but I suspect a lot of the problems in this home emanate from box ticking, bureaucracy and I would wager most of all, lack of staff.

I once worked in a home where there were six staff members looking after 84 residents between the hours of 10pm and 7am. Most residents had dementia - and as anyone who knows about dementia will know - bed time is nonexistent in a dementia home as the body clock often does not work when dementia takes hold.

Horrible disease, awful effect on the person and their family and very harrowing to work with.

No sneering comments needed by those who have never done it nor the usual bitchy remarks about what I am and am not supposed to have said previously. We all know that's lies and Photoshop.

I have a serious message here. The whole care system needs overhauling and the finger pointing that is done at those who blow the whistle needs to stop. Why train staff to spot and report anomalies then condemn them when they do it?
As somebody who knows I can address all of the above in one word: management. Grasping greedy care home owners who think more of looking after their shareholders and management than their residents and staff. Most of the above issues are a direct result, in my experience, of not having enough staff and resources. The average shift in a care home starts at 7am and ends after lunch with the second shift of the day starting after lunch and going on till mid evening. Often carers will work both shifts to make ends meet and are tired and exhausted. They often report things like missing footplates to management and nothing gets done. They don't have time to check everything as they are running around after their residents, helping them with eating and the toilet and bathing and everyday stuff like that which in the end, leaves little or no time for anything else. On top of that they are forced to write out reams and reams of paperwork and are shouted down if all these things are not done. Bullying and blame culture are rife and management rarely listens to staff, obsessed as management are, with box ticking. Very little time is given over for activities either as staff often do not have time and an activities coordinator will be hard pressed to handle all the activities totally on their own. It's good when other staff can join in but this is not often. I am basing my opinion on my personal experience of care homes, not the one above - but I suspect a lot of the problems in this home emanate from box ticking, bureaucracy and I would wager most of all, lack of staff. I once worked in a home where there were six staff members looking after 84 residents between the hours of 10pm and 7am. Most residents had dementia - and as anyone who knows about dementia will know - bed time is nonexistent in a dementia home as the body clock often does not work when dementia takes hold. Horrible disease, awful effect on the person and their family and very harrowing to work with. No sneering comments needed by those who have never done it nor the usual bitchy remarks about what I am and am not supposed to have said previously. We all know that's lies and Photoshop. I have a serious message here. The whole care system needs overhauling and the finger pointing that is done at those who blow the whistle needs to stop. Why train staff to spot and report anomalies then condemn them when they do it? Kim Gandy
  • Score: 5

10:37am Wed 15 Jan 14

Nowthatsworthknowing says...

Kim Gandy wrote:
As somebody who knows I can address all of the above in one word: management.

Grasping greedy care home owners who think more of looking after their shareholders and management than their residents and staff.

Most of the above issues are a direct result, in my experience, of not having enough staff and resources.

The average shift in a care home starts at 7am and ends after lunch with the second shift of the day starting after lunch and going on till mid evening. Often carers will work both shifts to make ends meet and are tired and exhausted.

They often report things like missing footplates to management and nothing gets done. They don't have time to check everything as they are running around after their residents, helping them with eating and the toilet and bathing and everyday stuff like that which in the end, leaves little or no time for anything else. On top of that they are forced to write out reams and reams of paperwork and are shouted down if all these things are not done.

Bullying and blame culture are rife and management rarely listens to staff, obsessed as management are, with box ticking.

Very little time is given over for activities either as staff often do not have time and an activities coordinator will be hard pressed to handle all the activities totally on their own. It's good when other staff can join in but this is not often.

I am basing my opinion on my personal experience of care homes, not the one above - but I suspect a lot of the problems in this home emanate from box ticking, bureaucracy and I would wager most of all, lack of staff.

I once worked in a home where there were six staff members looking after 84 residents between the hours of 10pm and 7am. Most residents had dementia - and as anyone who knows about dementia will know - bed time is nonexistent in a dementia home as the body clock often does not work when dementia takes hold.

Horrible disease, awful effect on the person and their family and very harrowing to work with.

No sneering comments needed by those who have never done it nor the usual bitchy remarks about what I am and am not supposed to have said previously. We all know that's lies and Photoshop.

I have a serious message here. The whole care system needs overhauling and the finger pointing that is done at those who blow the whistle needs to stop. Why train staff to spot and report anomalies then condemn them when they do it?
Probably hoping the home will be ready for yourself, next year ?
[quote][p][bold]Kim Gandy[/bold] wrote: As somebody who knows I can address all of the above in one word: management. Grasping greedy care home owners who think more of looking after their shareholders and management than their residents and staff. Most of the above issues are a direct result, in my experience, of not having enough staff and resources. The average shift in a care home starts at 7am and ends after lunch with the second shift of the day starting after lunch and going on till mid evening. Often carers will work both shifts to make ends meet and are tired and exhausted. They often report things like missing footplates to management and nothing gets done. They don't have time to check everything as they are running around after their residents, helping them with eating and the toilet and bathing and everyday stuff like that which in the end, leaves little or no time for anything else. On top of that they are forced to write out reams and reams of paperwork and are shouted down if all these things are not done. Bullying and blame culture are rife and management rarely listens to staff, obsessed as management are, with box ticking. Very little time is given over for activities either as staff often do not have time and an activities coordinator will be hard pressed to handle all the activities totally on their own. It's good when other staff can join in but this is not often. I am basing my opinion on my personal experience of care homes, not the one above - but I suspect a lot of the problems in this home emanate from box ticking, bureaucracy and I would wager most of all, lack of staff. I once worked in a home where there were six staff members looking after 84 residents between the hours of 10pm and 7am. Most residents had dementia - and as anyone who knows about dementia will know - bed time is nonexistent in a dementia home as the body clock often does not work when dementia takes hold. Horrible disease, awful effect on the person and their family and very harrowing to work with. No sneering comments needed by those who have never done it nor the usual bitchy remarks about what I am and am not supposed to have said previously. We all know that's lies and Photoshop. I have a serious message here. The whole care system needs overhauling and the finger pointing that is done at those who blow the whistle needs to stop. Why train staff to spot and report anomalies then condemn them when they do it?[/p][/quote]Probably hoping the home will be ready for yourself, next year ? Nowthatsworthknowing
  • Score: 0

10:58am Wed 15 Jan 14

Howard Cháse says...

Needs to bd mre rigorous and regular inspection etc of these don't care homes.
Needs to bd mre rigorous and regular inspection etc of these don't care homes. Howard Cháse
  • Score: 2

12:58pm Wed 15 Jan 14

bettyjackson1 says...

Kim Gandy wrote:
As somebody who knows I can address all of the above in one word: management.

Grasping greedy care home owners who think more of looking after their shareholders and management than their residents and staff.

Most of the above issues are a direct result, in my experience, of not having enough staff and resources.

The average shift in a care home starts at 7am and ends after lunch with the second shift of the day starting after lunch and going on till mid evening. Often carers will work both shifts to make ends meet and are tired and exhausted.

They often report things like missing footplates to management and nothing gets done. They don't have time to check everything as they are running around after their residents, helping them with eating and the toilet and bathing and everyday stuff like that which in the end, leaves little or no time for anything else. On top of that they are forced to write out reams and reams of paperwork and are shouted down if all these things are not done.

Bullying and blame culture are rife and management rarely listens to staff, obsessed as management are, with box ticking.

Very little time is given over for activities either as staff often do not have time and an activities coordinator will be hard pressed to handle all the activities totally on their own. It's good when other staff can join in but this is not often.

I am basing my opinion on my personal experience of care homes, not the one above - but I suspect a lot of the problems in this home emanate from box ticking, bureaucracy and I would wager most of all, lack of staff.

I once worked in a home where there were six staff members looking after 84 residents between the hours of 10pm and 7am. Most residents had dementia - and as anyone who knows about dementia will know - bed time is nonexistent in a dementia home as the body clock often does not work when dementia takes hold.

Horrible disease, awful effect on the person and their family and very harrowing to work with.

No sneering comments needed by those who have never done it nor the usual bitchy remarks about what I am and am not supposed to have said previously. We all know that's lies and Photoshop.

I have a serious message here. The whole care system needs overhauling and the finger pointing that is done at those who blow the whistle needs to stop. Why train staff to spot and report anomalies then condemn them when they do it?
That's it Kim, blame the greedy care home owners and management. What do you actually know about that side of the care industry? If it wasn't for the care home owners you would not be in work and there is obviously a great need to stop bed blocking.
You really are a negative nelly aren't you?? Ask for some Prozac when you are admitted to one soon.
[quote][p][bold]Kim Gandy[/bold] wrote: As somebody who knows I can address all of the above in one word: management. Grasping greedy care home owners who think more of looking after their shareholders and management than their residents and staff. Most of the above issues are a direct result, in my experience, of not having enough staff and resources. The average shift in a care home starts at 7am and ends after lunch with the second shift of the day starting after lunch and going on till mid evening. Often carers will work both shifts to make ends meet and are tired and exhausted. They often report things like missing footplates to management and nothing gets done. They don't have time to check everything as they are running around after their residents, helping them with eating and the toilet and bathing and everyday stuff like that which in the end, leaves little or no time for anything else. On top of that they are forced to write out reams and reams of paperwork and are shouted down if all these things are not done. Bullying and blame culture are rife and management rarely listens to staff, obsessed as management are, with box ticking. Very little time is given over for activities either as staff often do not have time and an activities coordinator will be hard pressed to handle all the activities totally on their own. It's good when other staff can join in but this is not often. I am basing my opinion on my personal experience of care homes, not the one above - but I suspect a lot of the problems in this home emanate from box ticking, bureaucracy and I would wager most of all, lack of staff. I once worked in a home where there were six staff members looking after 84 residents between the hours of 10pm and 7am. Most residents had dementia - and as anyone who knows about dementia will know - bed time is nonexistent in a dementia home as the body clock often does not work when dementia takes hold. Horrible disease, awful effect on the person and their family and very harrowing to work with. No sneering comments needed by those who have never done it nor the usual bitchy remarks about what I am and am not supposed to have said previously. We all know that's lies and Photoshop. I have a serious message here. The whole care system needs overhauling and the finger pointing that is done at those who blow the whistle needs to stop. Why train staff to spot and report anomalies then condemn them when they do it?[/p][/quote]That's it Kim, blame the greedy care home owners and management. What do you actually know about that side of the care industry? If it wasn't for the care home owners you would not be in work and there is obviously a great need to stop bed blocking. You really are a negative nelly aren't you?? Ask for some Prozac when you are admitted to one soon. bettyjackson1
  • Score: 3

5:12pm Wed 15 Jan 14

runwellian says...

… and care home owners know that, there is always a demand for care home beds but that doesn't justify greedy care home owners grabbing every penny they can without providing quality care.

Many of these homes are owned by doctors who kwon how to keep the money coming in, but old folk deserve to be treated with dignity and respect, that is what the homes get paid to provide, heaven knows they charge enough!
… and care home owners know that, there is always a demand for care home beds but that doesn't justify greedy care home owners grabbing every penny they can without providing quality care. Many of these homes are owned by doctors who kwon how to keep the money coming in, but old folk deserve to be treated with dignity and respect, that is what the homes get paid to provide, heaven knows they charge enough! runwellian
  • Score: -1

5:36pm Wed 15 Jan 14

Nowthatsworthknowing says...

Howard Cháse wrote:
Needs to bd mre rigorous and regular inspection etc of these don't care homes.
Keep taking your meds boy
[quote][p][bold]Howard Cháse[/bold] wrote: Needs to bd mre rigorous and regular inspection etc of these don't care homes.[/p][/quote]Keep taking your meds boy Nowthatsworthknowing
  • Score: 1

8:17pm Wed 15 Jan 14

LauqhLast.. says...

Kim Gandy wrote:
As somebody who knows I can address all of the above in one word: management.

Grasping greedy care home owners who think more of looking after their shareholders and management than their residents and staff.

Most of the above issues are a direct result, in my experience, of not having enough staff and resources.

The average shift in a care home starts at 7am and ends after lunch with the second shift of the day starting after lunch and going on till mid evening. Often carers will work both shifts to make ends meet and are tired and exhausted.

They often report things like missing footplates to management and nothing gets done. They don't have time to check everything as they are running around after their residents, helping them with eating and the toilet and bathing and everyday stuff like that which in the end, leaves little or no time for anything else. On top of that they are forced to write out reams and reams of paperwork and are shouted down if all these things are not done.

Bullying and blame culture are rife and management rarely listens to staff, obsessed as management are, with box ticking.

Very little time is given over for activities either as staff often do not have time and an activities coordinator will be hard pressed to handle all the activities totally on their own. It's good when other staff can join in but this is not often.

I am basing my opinion on my personal experience of care homes, not the one above - but I suspect a lot of the problems in this home emanate from box ticking, bureaucracy and I would wager most of all, lack of staff.

I once worked in a home where there were six staff members looking after 84 residents between the hours of 10pm and 7am. Most residents had dementia - and as anyone who knows about dementia will know - bed time is nonexistent in a dementia home as the body clock often does not work when dementia takes hold.

Horrible disease, awful effect on the person and their family and very harrowing to work with.

No sneering comments needed by those who have never done it nor the usual bitchy remarks about what I am and am not supposed to have said previously. We all know that's lies and Photoshop.

I have a serious message here. The whole care system needs overhauling and the finger pointing that is done at those who blow the whistle needs to stop. Why train staff to spot and report anomalies then condemn them when they do it?
Some staff abuse the people they are there to care for...or speak ill of them on social networks...all staff working in these homes need to be vetted by the police and social services before they get anywhere near care home residents..
[quote][p][bold]Kim Gandy[/bold] wrote: As somebody who knows I can address all of the above in one word: management. Grasping greedy care home owners who think more of looking after their shareholders and management than their residents and staff. Most of the above issues are a direct result, in my experience, of not having enough staff and resources. The average shift in a care home starts at 7am and ends after lunch with the second shift of the day starting after lunch and going on till mid evening. Often carers will work both shifts to make ends meet and are tired and exhausted. They often report things like missing footplates to management and nothing gets done. They don't have time to check everything as they are running around after their residents, helping them with eating and the toilet and bathing and everyday stuff like that which in the end, leaves little or no time for anything else. On top of that they are forced to write out reams and reams of paperwork and are shouted down if all these things are not done. Bullying and blame culture are rife and management rarely listens to staff, obsessed as management are, with box ticking. Very little time is given over for activities either as staff often do not have time and an activities coordinator will be hard pressed to handle all the activities totally on their own. It's good when other staff can join in but this is not often. I am basing my opinion on my personal experience of care homes, not the one above - but I suspect a lot of the problems in this home emanate from box ticking, bureaucracy and I would wager most of all, lack of staff. I once worked in a home where there were six staff members looking after 84 residents between the hours of 10pm and 7am. Most residents had dementia - and as anyone who knows about dementia will know - bed time is nonexistent in a dementia home as the body clock often does not work when dementia takes hold. Horrible disease, awful effect on the person and their family and very harrowing to work with. No sneering comments needed by those who have never done it nor the usual bitchy remarks about what I am and am not supposed to have said previously. We all know that's lies and Photoshop. I have a serious message here. The whole care system needs overhauling and the finger pointing that is done at those who blow the whistle needs to stop. Why train staff to spot and report anomalies then condemn them when they do it?[/p][/quote]Some staff abuse the people they are there to care for...or speak ill of them on social networks...all staff working in these homes need to be vetted by the police and social services before they get anywhere near care home residents.. LauqhLast..
  • Score: 2

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