Teachers in Essex set to strike over pay and pensions

Echo: Michael Gove Michael Gove

TEACHERS at schools across south Essex will walk out of their classrooms on strike next month.

The one-day national strike will mean thousands of children will be forced to stay at home on Wednesday, March 26, after teachers announced the industrial action over pay and pensions.

The action by the National Union of Teachers will be the latest in a long-running dispute and unions are blaming Education Secretary Michael Gove for “persistent refusals”

to address their complaints.

The last action planned for the end of November was called off after it looked like the two sides would get around the negotiating table.

However, Essex regional NUT representative Jerry Glazier said after 17 weeks of no contact, the NUT has decided to take action.

Mr Glazier said: “There had been an indication the Secretary of State wanted to enter into negotiations with us and other unions.

“Seventeen weeks since we were told that, we have had no meaningful discussion and he has refused to have specific meetings with us and others.

“So we have announced our intention to strike onMarch 26.

“If he wants to enter into negotiations we will happily do so. If it can be resolved, a strike would not be necessary.

“The ball is firmly back inMr Gove’s court.”

He added he expected a fairly substantial turnout in support of the strike across Southend and Essex schools.

On October 1 last year ten schools in Southend closed, and ten more were partially shut.

In Basildon, there were seven confirmed closures and seven schools were open for part of the day. All the Basildon academies were closed.

The dispute centres on the introduction of a new performance- related pay structure and tougher pension package.

The NASUWT is meeting this week to decide whether to strike again

Comments (13)

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9:14am Tue 11 Feb 14

supermadmax says...

These lot get enough holidays as it is, they set an appalling example to the kids.
These lot get enough holidays as it is, they set an appalling example to the kids. supermadmax

9:28am Tue 11 Feb 14

Bosniavet says...

Best avoid Lakeside and town centre eateries, pubs etc on that day (& perhaps the pubs on the night before) then - may well be full of striking teachers looking for bargains or "enjoying" a day out of the classroom. Actually quite surprised they aren't striking on a Monday or Friday at the beginning or end of the half term or Easter holidays, but I suppose that wouldn't cause such inconvenience to working parents would it?
Basically, the pensions & employment terms for teachers are something many of us can only dream of & I don't recall any teachers demonstrating for private sector workers to retain their pension schemes when they were abolished or changed beyond recognition.
Best avoid Lakeside and town centre eateries, pubs etc on that day (& perhaps the pubs on the night before) then - may well be full of striking teachers looking for bargains or "enjoying" a day out of the classroom. Actually quite surprised they aren't striking on a Monday or Friday at the beginning or end of the half term or Easter holidays, but I suppose that wouldn't cause such inconvenience to working parents would it? Basically, the pensions & employment terms for teachers are something many of us can only dream of & I don't recall any teachers demonstrating for private sector workers to retain their pension schemes when they were abolished or changed beyond recognition. Bosniavet

9:28am Tue 11 Feb 14

BillericayAdam says...

If my employer wanted to change my conditions of employment, and I refused, they could simply make me re-apply for my position - and subsequently not re-'hire' me.

If I even tried to strike, my employer would just laugh! What gives public sector workers the idea that they deserve year-on-year increases to salary as well as no change to their already out-dated and over-generous pensions?!
If my employer wanted to change my conditions of employment, and I refused, they could simply make me re-apply for my position - and subsequently not re-'hire' me. If I even tried to strike, my employer would just laugh! What gives public sector workers the idea that they deserve year-on-year increases to salary as well as no change to their already out-dated and over-generous pensions?! BillericayAdam

9:35am Tue 11 Feb 14

Jack222 says...

The point is they don't get year on year increases, Gove has removed all salary progressions and they can be paid anything so can be paid minimum wage. He has removed the need for any teacher to have any professional qualifications as well. So, what once was graduate career is now in a drive to the bottom. Would you like that in your career? How would you like an untrained dentist or untrained doctor operating on you? That's what Gove wants for your child's education.

This is in his drive to improve standards.

It's great teachers are standing up for teaching being a sensibly paid graduate profession (and it's not great pay and pensions - that's why there are very, very few science, maths and IT graduates in teaching as they can get far, far better paid in the city).
The point is they don't get year on year increases, Gove has removed all salary progressions and they can be paid anything so can be paid minimum wage. He has removed the need for any teacher to have any professional qualifications as well. So, what once was graduate career is now in a drive to the bottom. Would you like that in your career? How would you like an untrained dentist or untrained doctor operating on you? That's what Gove wants for your child's education. This is in his drive to improve standards. It's great teachers are standing up for teaching being a sensibly paid graduate profession (and it's not great pay and pensions - that's why there are very, very few science, maths and IT graduates in teaching as they can get far, far better paid in the city). Jack222

9:50am Tue 11 Feb 14

Nebs says...

Jack222 wrote:
The point is they don't get year on year increases, Gove has removed all salary progressions and they can be paid anything so can be paid minimum wage. He has removed the need for any teacher to have any professional qualifications as well. So, what once was graduate career is now in a drive to the bottom. Would you like that in your career? How would you like an untrained dentist or untrained doctor operating on you? That's what Gove wants for your child's education.

This is in his drive to improve standards.

It's great teachers are standing up for teaching being a sensibly paid graduate profession (and it's not great pay and pensions - that's why there are very, very few science, maths and IT graduates in teaching as they can get far, far better paid in the city).
Getting a degree does not automatically make you a good teacher.
[quote][p][bold]Jack222[/bold] wrote: The point is they don't get year on year increases, Gove has removed all salary progressions and they can be paid anything so can be paid minimum wage. He has removed the need for any teacher to have any professional qualifications as well. So, what once was graduate career is now in a drive to the bottom. Would you like that in your career? How would you like an untrained dentist or untrained doctor operating on you? That's what Gove wants for your child's education. This is in his drive to improve standards. It's great teachers are standing up for teaching being a sensibly paid graduate profession (and it's not great pay and pensions - that's why there are very, very few science, maths and IT graduates in teaching as they can get far, far better paid in the city).[/p][/quote]Getting a degree does not automatically make you a good teacher. Nebs

9:58am Tue 11 Feb 14

Criminal & Proud says...

BillericayAdam wrote:
If my employer wanted to change my conditions of employment, and I refused, they could simply make me re-apply for my position - and subsequently not re-'hire' me.

If I even tried to strike, my employer would just laugh! What gives public sector workers the idea that they deserve year-on-year increases to salary as well as no change to their already out-dated and over-generous pensions?!
I don't work anyway. I set myself targets through crime. How much I can make in a week, or how much things I can shoplift.
[quote][p][bold]BillericayAdam[/bold] wrote: If my employer wanted to change my conditions of employment, and I refused, they could simply make me re-apply for my position - and subsequently not re-'hire' me. If I even tried to strike, my employer would just laugh! What gives public sector workers the idea that they deserve year-on-year increases to salary as well as no change to their already out-dated and over-generous pensions?![/p][/quote]I don't work anyway. I set myself targets through crime. How much I can make in a week, or how much things I can shoplift. Criminal & Proud

10:11am Tue 11 Feb 14

Nebs says...

Criminal & Proud wrote:
BillericayAdam wrote:
If my employer wanted to change my conditions of employment, and I refused, they could simply make me re-apply for my position - and subsequently not re-'hire' me.

If I even tried to strike, my employer would just laugh! What gives public sector workers the idea that they deserve year-on-year increases to salary as well as no change to their already out-dated and over-generous pensions?!
I don't work anyway. I set myself targets through crime. How much I can make in a week, or how much things I can shoplift.
It's good to have a business plan with realistic targets. Have you joined the Essex branch of the Amalgamated Union of Muggers, Burglars and Shoplifters. They are campaigning for a reduction in Police numbers, the promotion of poor quality unmonitored CCTV, and the abolition of prison sentences for those unlucky enough to get caught. All these campaigns have been a great success as you will have seen by some of the articles in the newspaper.
[quote][p][bold]Criminal & Proud[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]BillericayAdam[/bold] wrote: If my employer wanted to change my conditions of employment, and I refused, they could simply make me re-apply for my position - and subsequently not re-'hire' me. If I even tried to strike, my employer would just laugh! What gives public sector workers the idea that they deserve year-on-year increases to salary as well as no change to their already out-dated and over-generous pensions?![/p][/quote]I don't work anyway. I set myself targets through crime. How much I can make in a week, or how much things I can shoplift.[/p][/quote]It's good to have a business plan with realistic targets. Have you joined the Essex branch of the Amalgamated Union of Muggers, Burglars and Shoplifters. They are campaigning for a reduction in Police numbers, the promotion of poor quality unmonitored CCTV, and the abolition of prison sentences for those unlucky enough to get caught. All these campaigns have been a great success as you will have seen by some of the articles in the newspaper. Nebs

12:03pm Tue 11 Feb 14

niki-loo says...

but ill get fined for taking my kids out of school for a short holiday......
but ill get fined for taking my kids out of school for a short holiday...... niki-loo

1:32pm Tue 11 Feb 14

ThisYear says...

niki-loo wrote:
but ill get fined for taking my kids out of school for a short holiday......
Then challenge any fine..
[quote][p][bold]niki-loo[/bold] wrote: but ill get fined for taking my kids out of school for a short holiday......[/p][/quote]Then challenge any fine.. ThisYear

1:42pm Tue 11 Feb 14

profondo asbo says...

Jack222 wrote:
The point is they don't get year on year increases, Gove has removed all salary progressions and they can be paid anything so can be paid minimum wage. He has removed the need for any teacher to have any professional qualifications as well. So, what once was graduate career is now in a drive to the bottom. Would you like that in your career? How would you like an untrained dentist or untrained doctor operating on you? That's what Gove wants for your child's education.

This is in his drive to improve standards.

It's great teachers are standing up for teaching being a sensibly paid graduate profession (and it's not great pay and pensions - that's why there are very, very few science, maths and IT graduates in teaching as they can get far, far better paid in the city).
why are teachers afraid of performance related pay? which other professions offer guaranteed salary escalation?
[quote][p][bold]Jack222[/bold] wrote: The point is they don't get year on year increases, Gove has removed all salary progressions and they can be paid anything so can be paid minimum wage. He has removed the need for any teacher to have any professional qualifications as well. So, what once was graduate career is now in a drive to the bottom. Would you like that in your career? How would you like an untrained dentist or untrained doctor operating on you? That's what Gove wants for your child's education. This is in his drive to improve standards. It's great teachers are standing up for teaching being a sensibly paid graduate profession (and it's not great pay and pensions - that's why there are very, very few science, maths and IT graduates in teaching as they can get far, far better paid in the city).[/p][/quote]why are teachers afraid of performance related pay? which other professions offer guaranteed salary escalation? profondo asbo

4:14pm Tue 11 Feb 14

You'dfeelbetterforknowingthat says...

niki-loo wrote:
but ill get fined for taking my kids out of school for a short holiday......
Well of course you will...thats the Law.
[quote][p][bold]niki-loo[/bold] wrote: but ill get fined for taking my kids out of school for a short holiday......[/p][/quote]Well of course you will...thats the Law. You'dfeelbetterforknowingthat

6:04pm Tue 11 Feb 14

Living the La Vida Legra says...

What's an employer provided pension? Self Employed and proud of paying my 6% tax
What's an employer provided pension? Self Employed and proud of paying my 6% tax Living the La Vida Legra

7:07pm Tue 11 Feb 14

tricklesthegreek says...

I am a teacher myself. 1) I won't be striking but I will bet that my school will have to close because I can't take a class of 400 kids by myself. 2) I'm not afraid of performance related pay because I know I do a good job so I can justify my pay rises the same as I had to when I was in the private sector. 3) This article is a bit premature because it is only NUT members that have voted to strike. Lots of schools have teachers in other unions and if they do not vote to strike then this will be a bit of a non event as most schools will operate with a reduced teaching staff.

The point about Gove wanted unqualified teachers in class made above is a valid one. I would not want my child being taught by someone who hasn't had the appropriate training. But I wouldn't want my child being taught by an inadequate teacher either. PRP should hopefully start to weed out the weaklings. Parents do need to play their part though and realize that Mr Gove is going to ultimately screw the education of this generation into the ground. Children at school at 2? Teachers to do 9-6 'to benefit parents', yet in the same breath claiming we are not babysitters? Children in continental Europe start school later and progress at a more accelerated rate because they have had time to be children, be at home with their parents and learn the value of nurture. Our children are already shoved into a system too early that wants to judge them and creates disengagement and promotes failure at far too young an age. Striking may not be my cup of tea as I feel we are paid to do a job, but something has got to be done to stop this one person who has no actual experience of education apart from his own childhood from stuffing it completely for the next generation.
I am a teacher myself. 1) I won't be striking but I will bet that my school will have to close because I can't take a class of 400 kids by myself. 2) I'm not afraid of performance related pay because I know I do a good job so I can justify my pay rises the same as I had to when I was in the private sector. 3) This article is a bit premature because it is only NUT members that have voted to strike. Lots of schools have teachers in other unions and if they do not vote to strike then this will be a bit of a non event as most schools will operate with a reduced teaching staff. The point about Gove wanted unqualified teachers in class made above is a valid one. I would not want my child being taught by someone who hasn't had the appropriate training. But I wouldn't want my child being taught by an inadequate teacher either. PRP should hopefully start to weed out the weaklings. Parents do need to play their part though and realize that Mr Gove is going to ultimately screw the education of this generation into the ground. Children at school at 2? Teachers to do 9-6 'to benefit parents', yet in the same breath claiming we are not babysitters? Children in continental Europe start school later and progress at a more accelerated rate because they have had time to be children, be at home with their parents and learn the value of nurture. Our children are already shoved into a system too early that wants to judge them and creates disengagement and promotes failure at far too young an age. Striking may not be my cup of tea as I feel we are paid to do a job, but something has got to be done to stop this one person who has no actual experience of education apart from his own childhood from stuffing it completely for the next generation. tricklesthegreek

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