Our hunt for relatives of Leigh WWI heroes

Echo: Find our war heroes Find our war heroes

A CHURCH is on a quest to find relatives of parishioners killed in the First World War for a memorial service marking the start of the conflict.

The names of four church members are carved into the wooden altar at the Union Congregational Church, in Pall Mall, Leigh.

Now the Rev Stan Hamberger and Deacon Mark Perkins are keen to invite relatives of the men to a centenary service on August 3.

The parishioners are: Second Lt Pervical Crawley Challener, of the King’s regiment, who died on December 12, 1917; Lt Eric Neville Van der Ben Copeland, of the Royal Naval Division, who died on March 26, 1918; Rifleman John Sewell Davies, of the London Regiment, who died on April 24, 1915; Private Richard George Wordsworth, of the Essex Regiment, who died on August 18, 1918.

Mr Perkins said: “All we know of Lt Copeland was he lived at 1 Grand Drive, Leigh.

“We also know Rifleman Davies was the son of the Rev T Davies, who was a minister of the church in the early part of the century.

“Unfortunately, that’s all the information we have. But if anyone thinks these men are relatives, we would like to invite them to the memorial service.”

To contact the church, call 01702 826579.

Comments (4)

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5:34pm Thu 29 May 14

Jack222 says...

I hate to say it but I am going to become extremely bored very quickly if we have four years of WW1 memorials filling the papers.
I hate to say it but I am going to become extremely bored very quickly if we have four years of WW1 memorials filling the papers. Jack222
  • Score: -2

6:46pm Thu 29 May 14

Kim Gandy says...

Jack222 wrote:
I hate to say it but I am going to become extremely bored very quickly if we have four years of WW1 memorials filling the papers.
I hate to say it but I am going to become extremely bored with people like you moaning and groaning about it and sullying the memory of those who fought and fell for your freedom of speech to spout such ungrateful rubbish as that time people like you might learn some respect.

I hope the next four years promises to be a time when we ALL remember the sacrifices made in the hellholes and mudbaths of Northern France and Belgium - and elsewhere for that matter - for future generations to remember that these men spent four years up to their necks in dirt, muddy water, rats and detritus in all weathers, not to mention seeing their friends and brothers' shot to pieces in front of them.

The horror and hell they suffered should never be forgotten and clearly, given your above comment, we need even more WWI events just so people like you can acquaint yourself with a few unpalatable facts.

I should imagine those boys - as many of them were back then, barely 16 - would have loved to have been "bored" rather than the ghastly alternatives millions of them suffered - to be blown to smithereens to preserve future ingrates like you.
[quote][p][bold]Jack222[/bold] wrote: I hate to say it but I am going to become extremely bored very quickly if we have four years of WW1 memorials filling the papers.[/p][/quote]I hate to say it but I am going to become extremely bored with people like you moaning and groaning about it and sullying the memory of those who fought and fell for your freedom of speech to spout such ungrateful rubbish as that time people like you might learn some respect. I hope the next four years promises to be a time when we ALL remember the sacrifices made in the hellholes and mudbaths of Northern France and Belgium - and elsewhere for that matter - for future generations to remember that these men spent four years up to their necks in dirt, muddy water, rats and detritus in all weathers, not to mention seeing their friends and brothers' shot to pieces in front of them. The horror and hell they suffered should never be forgotten and clearly, given your above comment, we need even more WWI events just so people like you can acquaint yourself with a few unpalatable facts. I should imagine those boys - as many of them were back then, barely 16 - would have loved to have been "bored" rather than the ghastly alternatives millions of them suffered - to be blown to smithereens to preserve future ingrates like you. Kim Gandy
  • Score: 5

1:28pm Fri 30 May 14

Firestormgjc says...

Kim Gandy wrote:
Jack222 wrote:
I hate to say it but I am going to become extremely bored very quickly if we have four years of WW1 memorials filling the papers.
I hate to say it but I am going to become extremely bored with people like you moaning and groaning about it and sullying the memory of those who fought and fell for your freedom of speech to spout such ungrateful rubbish as that time people like you might learn some respect.

I hope the next four years promises to be a time when we ALL remember the sacrifices made in the hellholes and mudbaths of Northern France and Belgium - and elsewhere for that matter - for future generations to remember that these men spent four years up to their necks in dirt, muddy water, rats and detritus in all weathers, not to mention seeing their friends and brothers' shot to pieces in front of them.

The horror and hell they suffered should never be forgotten and clearly, given your above comment, we need even more WWI events just so people like you can acquaint yourself with a few unpalatable facts.

I should imagine those boys - as many of them were back then, barely 16 - would have loved to have been "bored" rather than the ghastly alternatives millions of them suffered - to be blown to smithereens to preserve future ingrates like you.
I am not sure the Great war was fought on the basis of Freedom of Speech , particularly as there was no such thing at the turn of the last century, I mean, women didn't even have the vote.....

That could be said of WW2 as there was definitely the potential for the British Isles to be invaded by a force with an population oppressionagenda.

However factual inaccuracies aside, I think the sentiment regarding not disrespecting WWI casulaties is one which should be adhered to
[quote][p][bold]Kim Gandy[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Jack222[/bold] wrote: I hate to say it but I am going to become extremely bored very quickly if we have four years of WW1 memorials filling the papers.[/p][/quote]I hate to say it but I am going to become extremely bored with people like you moaning and groaning about it and sullying the memory of those who fought and fell for your freedom of speech to spout such ungrateful rubbish as that time people like you might learn some respect. I hope the next four years promises to be a time when we ALL remember the sacrifices made in the hellholes and mudbaths of Northern France and Belgium - and elsewhere for that matter - for future generations to remember that these men spent four years up to their necks in dirt, muddy water, rats and detritus in all weathers, not to mention seeing their friends and brothers' shot to pieces in front of them. The horror and hell they suffered should never be forgotten and clearly, given your above comment, we need even more WWI events just so people like you can acquaint yourself with a few unpalatable facts. I should imagine those boys - as many of them were back then, barely 16 - would have loved to have been "bored" rather than the ghastly alternatives millions of them suffered - to be blown to smithereens to preserve future ingrates like you.[/p][/quote]I am not sure the Great war was fought on the basis of Freedom of Speech , particularly as there was no such thing at the turn of the last century, I mean, women didn't even have the vote..... That could be said of WW2 as there was definitely the potential for the British Isles to be invaded by a force with an population oppressionagenda. However factual inaccuracies aside, I think the sentiment regarding not disrespecting WWI casulaties is one which should be adhered to Firestormgjc
  • Score: 2

5:58pm Fri 30 May 14

John Right says...

I was lucky enough, something of which I only found out having left the army, to have known and served with some hard nosed army Padres to realise the sacrifices made by so many, are something which most civilians cannot or indeed should not, have reason to contemplate, My Padre the Reverend Cooper B Company II Para 1975 - 1987 was a gentleman who told many soldiers, the perils of war stories yet the importance of remembrance.
Since those days, with the popularity of the armed forces being projected somewhat from obscurity, right into one's lap, due to recent conflicts, it's easy to forget the basic decencies, known as remembrance.
I was lucky enough, something of which I only found out having left the army, to have known and served with some hard nosed army Padres to realise the sacrifices made by so many, are something which most civilians cannot or indeed should not, have reason to contemplate, My Padre the Reverend Cooper B Company II Para 1975 - 1987 was a gentleman who told many soldiers, the perils of war stories yet the importance of remembrance. Since those days, with the popularity of the armed forces being projected somewhat from obscurity, right into one's lap, due to recent conflicts, it's easy to forget the basic decencies, known as remembrance. John Right
  • Score: 2

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