Inner Wheel to close forever

Final fundraiser - Inner Wheel president Jean Quarmby, Geoffrey Bradley with his flower arrangement and Eric Quarmby, from Talking Newspapers

Final fundraiser - Inner Wheel president Jean Quarmby, Geoffrey Bradley with his flower arrangement and Eric Quarmby, from Talking Newspapers

First published in News

A CLUB which has raised cash for charity for 69 years is set to close this month due to dwindling numbers of members.

The Southend Inner Wheel club, has voted to close at the end of June.

The club was formed as a Rotary Club off-shoot for women members, but it expanded to include friends associated with the club.

At its peak, the Southend club had more than 40 members, but this dwindled to 22, some of whom were too elderly to attend meetings. Over the years it has raised many thousands of pounds for charity.

Member Janice Price said: “With no new members joining, and an understandable reluctance on the part of long-serving members to continue rotating the various offices, there was really no alternative.

“So sadly we held our last meeting on June 11.

“In recognition of the support and help that Inner Wheel has provided over the years, Southend Rotary president Ron Price organised a joint dinner at the Rendezvous Casino attended by Rotarians, their partners and Inner Wheel members.”

During its last year, the club raised £1,000 for Southend Talking Newspapers, through various events including a flower arranging evening. Mrs Price added: “It’s a real shame, but it is happening to all the clubs, including Rotary and the Round Table. So many people have to work long hours, particularly if they work in London, and women often have to work in the evening if they have children.

“Rotary clubs all over the country are suffering. It’s a great shame because they do an awful lot of charity work and do valued work in the community.”

When the accounts were finalised, Inner wheel was also able to give £100 each to Save the Children, Water Aid, Bust, Mary’s Meals, Turning Tides (SAVS), RNLI, Samaritans and Motor Neurone Support.

Comments (1)

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6:21pm Thu 26 Jun 14

Kim Gandy says...

Perhaps the profile of these clubs needs to be raised and younger members encouraged to join, perhaps with different activities. The ideal would be activities aimed at all age groups, especially where the younger can benefit from the experience of the older. And in some cases vice versa. For example, the young could learn skills such as sewing and knitting, gardening, woodwork whereas the young could teach the older ones how to use computers, the internet and other technology.

This would have been a prime opportunity to trade skills and create a healthy respect between varying age groups.

I've always thought what a good idea it would be to have a club where younger people are taught dying skills by older people. There are a lot of skills not covered by the National Curriculum and there are a lot of dying art and craft skills that people could put to good use - and even earn from them.

And the results of these efforts could be sold to raise money for charities. There are a lot of unemployed and young unemployed people who could benefit from this.

Surely David Cameron's "Big Society" idea could be put to good use here. What about Lottery funding?

It seems a shame that something that has been running for 69 years should cease to exist. It seems such a waste.
Perhaps the profile of these clubs needs to be raised and younger members encouraged to join, perhaps with different activities. The ideal would be activities aimed at all age groups, especially where the younger can benefit from the experience of the older. And in some cases vice versa. For example, the young could learn skills such as sewing and knitting, gardening, woodwork whereas the young could teach the older ones how to use computers, the internet and other technology. This would have been a prime opportunity to trade skills and create a healthy respect between varying age groups. I've always thought what a good idea it would be to have a club where younger people are taught dying skills by older people. There are a lot of skills not covered by the National Curriculum and there are a lot of dying art and craft skills that people could put to good use - and even earn from them. And the results of these efforts could be sold to raise money for charities. There are a lot of unemployed and young unemployed people who could benefit from this. Surely David Cameron's "Big Society" idea could be put to good use here. What about Lottery funding? It seems a shame that something that has been running for 69 years should cease to exist. It seems such a waste. Kim Gandy
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