Plan to help poor get in grammars

Plan to help poor get in grammars

Plan to help poor get in grammars

First published in News

GRAMMAR schools in Southend will be asked to make sure poorer pupils have the chance to pass the 11-plus and gain a place.

Southend Council set out a seven-point pledge for more pupils from the borough’s primary schools to pass the 11-plus after a series of exposes by the Echo.

The new councillor responsible for children and learning has also pledged to discuss access for poorer children, as only 1-in-16 grammar school pupils qualifies for free school meals.

Labour councillor Anne Jones said: “Through our seven-point pledge, wewill be continuing with this challenge and will be talking with the four grammar schools in Southend to ensure the excellent work they are already undertaking to support able and gifted pupils is also reaching those who are eligible for free school meals.”

The Echo revealed just 1-in-10 Southend pupils pass the 11-plus and only 197 were offered places at a grammar this school year.

Under the new pledge, primary school governors will be expected to monitor what secondary schools pupils apply to and get into.

The council will also “challenge”

primary schools on their use of a £953-a-year topup per poorer pupil, known as the “pupil premium”.

Mrs Jones, who was on the working party that developed the pledge, said: “This council wants every young person to achieve the best academic and vocational results they can and we have supported families and schools to make the 11-plus more accessible to all children.”

Robin Bevan, headteacher of Southend High School for Boys, said: “Southend High School for Boys is for any boy who will thrive in an academic environment and is ready to respond to our challenges.

“This school is within reach. We celebrate students who achieve highly when life outside school is challenging.

“It is always very rewarding when our teachers see outstanding results, or a place at a leading university, for a student from a relatively disadvantaged home.”

Comments (9)

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8:20pm Fri 27 Jun 14

jolllyboy says...

If teachers dont believe in the 11 plus and grammars you will not get the child there. poor or wealthy it should be on merit unless a primary school says that it will benefit the child to be at the grammar with help to bring out the brain capability that the school believe they have.
If teachers dont believe in the 11 plus and grammars you will not get the child there. poor or wealthy it should be on merit unless a primary school says that it will benefit the child to be at the grammar with help to bring out the brain capability that the school believe they have. jolllyboy
  • Score: 3

9:35pm Fri 27 Jun 14

Maddogg says...

Sorry, don't get it. If you're rich or poor, or somewhere in the middle,does it matter? If he or she has the ability to pass the 11+, free school meals or not! they deserve the opportunity that a grammar school can offer.
Sorry, don't get it. If you're rich or poor, or somewhere in the middle,does it matter? If he or she has the ability to pass the 11+, free school meals or not! they deserve the opportunity that a grammar school can offer. Maddogg
  • Score: 11

11:17pm Fri 27 Jun 14

emcee says...

ALL primary children should be taking the 11+.
If children then fail it will either mean that they are not academically suitable to a grammar school education or, in the case of the majority of children in the school failing, the teaching in that particular primary school is not up to scratch and must be looked into. However, to gauge this every primary school must facilitate each and every child taking the 11+ (or at least some alternative system in which each primary school must partake). Only the parents should decide whether a their child should take the exam, not the school. Even then, guidence should be given to parents to encourage them to steer their child towards taking it.
ALL primary children should be taking the 11+. If children then fail it will either mean that they are not academically suitable to a grammar school education or, in the case of the majority of children in the school failing, the teaching in that particular primary school is not up to scratch and must be looked into. However, to gauge this every primary school must facilitate each and every child taking the 11+ (or at least some alternative system in which each primary school must partake). Only the parents should decide whether a their child should take the exam, not the school. Even then, guidence should be given to parents to encourage them to steer their child towards taking it. emcee
  • Score: 2

9:10am Sat 28 Jun 14

jayman says...

The first barrier for poorer pupils is an economic one. The price of the school uniform is astronomical, the school field trips are out of touch with the financial reality of poorer families.

The second barrier is conceptual. Southends grammar schools are in the business of crafting, maintaining and encouraging an 'imaginary' difference and correlation between 'grammar and state' school and 'success and failure' They will present and dilate this before prospective parents. The staff at SHSB seem to look at statistics (which sadly marks southends three main, state secondary schools which are languishing at the bottom of OFSTED league tables) as vindication for the divided and antiquated system of selective education. Grammar schools are a Zero-sum game. which do harm to overall community educational outcomes.

southend is unique because it has a cluster of grammar schools, there sum-effect is more acute in southend. Grammar schools have a socio-economic impact which is both a necessary raw material for the purposes of contrasting the 'imaginary' enhanced educational and a 'aspirational idyll' that they promote. The by-product which is produced by separating and Othering children is socially and emotionally toxic and can do great harm. this is the above mentioned 'Zero-sum game' Grammar schools do a great amount of harm to society by providing a 'limited good' and an 'imaginary advantage' to a 'selective few' within a closed system.

Of course, the inescapable truth is that children can be thought to a high standard in any class, in any school, in any part of the country. Everything else is just a convoluted act of 'imagination'. why do we really need grammar schools as a state funded part of the educational system if they have the ability to do a Greater harm?.
The first barrier for poorer pupils is an economic one. The price of the school uniform is astronomical, the school field trips are out of touch with the financial reality of poorer families. The second barrier is conceptual. Southends grammar schools are in the business of crafting, maintaining and encouraging an 'imaginary' difference and correlation between 'grammar and state' school and 'success and failure' They will present and dilate this before prospective parents. The staff at SHSB seem to look at statistics (which sadly marks southends three main, state secondary schools which are languishing at the bottom of OFSTED league tables) as vindication for the divided and antiquated system of selective education. Grammar schools are a Zero-sum game. which do harm to overall community educational outcomes. southend is unique because it has a cluster of grammar schools, there sum-effect is more acute in southend. Grammar schools have a socio-economic impact which is both a necessary raw material for the purposes of contrasting the 'imaginary' enhanced educational and a 'aspirational idyll' that they promote. The by-product which is produced by separating and Othering children is socially and emotionally toxic and can do great harm. this is the above mentioned 'Zero-sum game' Grammar schools do a great amount of harm to society by providing a 'limited good' and an 'imaginary advantage' to a 'selective few' within a closed system. Of course, the inescapable truth is that children can be thought to a high standard in any class, in any school, in any part of the country. Everything else is just a convoluted act of 'imagination'. why do we really need grammar schools as a state funded part of the educational system if they have the ability to do a Greater harm?. jayman
  • Score: -5

11:35am Sat 28 Jun 14

Nebs says...

emcee wrote:
ALL primary children should be taking the 11+.
If children then fail it will either mean that they are not academically suitable to a grammar school education or, in the case of the majority of children in the school failing, the teaching in that particular primary school is not up to scratch and must be looked into. However, to gauge this every primary school must facilitate each and every child taking the 11+ (or at least some alternative system in which each primary school must partake). Only the parents should decide whether a their child should take the exam, not the school. Even then, guidence should be given to parents to encourage them to steer their child towards taking it.
Yes.
[quote][p][bold]emcee[/bold] wrote: ALL primary children should be taking the 11+. If children then fail it will either mean that they are not academically suitable to a grammar school education or, in the case of the majority of children in the school failing, the teaching in that particular primary school is not up to scratch and must be looked into. However, to gauge this every primary school must facilitate each and every child taking the 11+ (or at least some alternative system in which each primary school must partake). Only the parents should decide whether a their child should take the exam, not the school. Even then, guidence should be given to parents to encourage them to steer their child towards taking it.[/p][/quote]Yes. Nebs
  • Score: 2

12:35pm Sat 28 Jun 14

joe3112 says...

Nebs wrote:
emcee wrote:
ALL primary children should be taking the 11+.
If children then fail it will either mean that they are not academically suitable to a grammar school education or, in the case of the majority of children in the school failing, the teaching in that particular primary school is not up to scratch and must be looked into. However, to gauge this every primary school must facilitate each and every child taking the 11+ (or at least some alternative system in which each primary school must partake). Only the parents should decide whether a their child should take the exam, not the school. Even then, guidence should be given to parents to encourage them to steer their child towards taking it.
Yes.
The problem is that in some primary schools in the 1980's the teachers were totally against the 11+ and would not put children forward. We had to actively insist that one of our sons be allowed to take the exam. He achieved 3 A levels. This was more a question of political dogma than trying to do the best for their children.
[quote][p][bold]Nebs[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]emcee[/bold] wrote: ALL primary children should be taking the 11+. If children then fail it will either mean that they are not academically suitable to a grammar school education or, in the case of the majority of children in the school failing, the teaching in that particular primary school is not up to scratch and must be looked into. However, to gauge this every primary school must facilitate each and every child taking the 11+ (or at least some alternative system in which each primary school must partake). Only the parents should decide whether a their child should take the exam, not the school. Even then, guidence should be given to parents to encourage them to steer their child towards taking it.[/p][/quote]Yes.[/p][/quote]The problem is that in some primary schools in the 1980's the teachers were totally against the 11+ and would not put children forward. We had to actively insist that one of our sons be allowed to take the exam. He achieved 3 A levels. This was more a question of political dogma than trying to do the best for their children. joe3112
  • Score: 2

3:32pm Sat 28 Jun 14

Fab man says...

It is well known that left wing politics is endemic in the state school system where the communists want to keep the poor children poor (except for their own children that is) in the misguided belief that they will further the cause in the future. Unless your part of the 'old boys network' or have money your kids won't get in to Grammar schools.
It is well known that left wing politics is endemic in the state school system where the communists want to keep the poor children poor (except for their own children that is) in the misguided belief that they will further the cause in the future. Unless your part of the 'old boys network' or have money your kids won't get in to Grammar schools. Fab man
  • Score: -3

5:15pm Sat 28 Jun 14

Jack222 says...

The 11+ can be bought - tutors know what to do. That's what middle class parents pay for and working class parents dont know about - and cant afford to pay. So the 11+ is not valid measure which should be used.

Check government added values and you will see that Grammar Schools give little added value to their students as the students chosen are already enriched when they go the school as they come from solidly supportive, well- educated home backgrounds.

Never forget the strongest predictor of how well a child does at school is home background (and many academic studies show this) and the 11+ is merely an indicator of this home background.
The 11+ can be bought - tutors know what to do. That's what middle class parents pay for and working class parents dont know about - and cant afford to pay. So the 11+ is not valid measure which should be used. Check government added values and you will see that Grammar Schools give little added value to their students as the students chosen are already enriched when they go the school as they come from solidly supportive, well- educated home backgrounds. Never forget the strongest predictor of how well a child does at school is home background (and many academic studies show this) and the 11+ is merely an indicator of this home background. Jack222
  • Score: -1

8:10pm Sun 29 Jun 14

mikepaterson says...

This is all wrong. You do not pass or fail the 11 plus, you simply attain a score which is either high enough for the school you want, or not. The figure changes from year to year based upon the number of places and the results of the children. It is ridiculous to tutor kids for the eleven plus as all you are doing is guaranteeing that your child is going to a school which may not suit them. Likewise doing something to ensure certain kids are given priority despite not achieving the relevant score is also bloody ridiculous.

What a farce!
This is all wrong. You do not pass or fail the 11 plus, you simply attain a score which is either high enough for the school you want, or not. The figure changes from year to year based upon the number of places and the results of the children. It is ridiculous to tutor kids for the eleven plus as all you are doing is guaranteeing that your child is going to a school which may not suit them. Likewise doing something to ensure certain kids are given priority despite not achieving the relevant score is also bloody ridiculous. What a farce! mikepaterson
  • Score: 0

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