Number of Southend pupils going to university revealed

Anne Jones outside Essex University

Anne Jones outside Essex University

First published in News by

SOUTHEND pupils could be offered more careers advice as fewer go to university than almost anywhere in the country.

The town has the jointninth worst education authority in the country for sending young people to university, with pupils in some London boroughs almost twice as likely to go on to higher education.

Just more than four in ten Southend pupils go on to university, new figures show, compared to half in Thurrock and the rest of Essex.

Anne Jones, who became Southend councillor responsible for children and learning when the new joint administration took over last month, warned against overreacting to the figures, but pledged to ensure children and parents have enough information to make the best choice for them.

She said: “The new joint administration is building on the work started by the previous administration to work with primary schools to make sure that all families and children have the opportunity and the choice to access the best schools and get the best qualifications.

“A cross-party group devised the seven-point pledge to make this happen.

“I do want to expand on the work we do with careers guidance teams who talk and advise children and their parents about the pathway and options available to them for A-Levels and beyond, and build on the work we already do on school admissions.

“Part of this guidance is to discuss higher education and apprenticeship options. Our education strategy also aims to include all those from less affluent backgrounds and give them the best opportunities and choice.”

The Labour councillor for Kursaal and Conservative James Courtenay, her predecessor as councillor responsible for children and learning, both stressed the importance of vocational qualifications.

Mrs Jones added: “The academic route is not necessarily for everyone, and there is absolutely nothing wrong with people making a vocational choice.

“Southend, and Essex as a whole, is well known for its entrepreneurialism and the council offers a number of apprenticeship opportunities across the organisation which mean young people can get paid whilst getting Level 4 and Level 5 qualifications.”

Mr Courtenay said: “People shouldn’t go to university for the sake of going to university, but I don’t think we should be in the bottom ten local authorities.”

Comments (6)

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1:12pm Thu 3 Jul 14

Andycal 172D says...

Good to see the Grammar School system working so well for everyone in Southend.
Good to see the Grammar School system working so well for everyone in Southend. Andycal 172D
  • Score: -2

1:28pm Thu 3 Jul 14

Motherlode says...

Southend schools need to equip their pupils with qualifications that will allow them to get to University and study a worthwhile degree - where the student debt accrued is counterbalanced by the increased salary when you're working.
If you're not at one of the grammars, then you have no chance - you're simply pushed towards qualifications that count for league tables and very little else.
7 point pledges and careers guidance do nothing when no one passes A Level Maths but everyone passes A Level Dance (yes, it exists).
Southend schools need to equip their pupils with qualifications that will allow them to get to University and study a worthwhile degree - where the student debt accrued is counterbalanced by the increased salary when you're working. If you're not at one of the grammars, then you have no chance - you're simply pushed towards qualifications that count for league tables and very little else. 7 point pledges and careers guidance do nothing when no one passes A Level Maths but everyone passes A Level Dance (yes, it exists). Motherlode
  • Score: 1

1:42pm Thu 3 Jul 14

Jack222 says...

How many Southend parents have been to University?

Yes, the biggest predictor of how well a child does at school is home background, not the schools.

So the figures which would be interesting is not merely the percentage of students who go to university but the match with percentage of parents who went. Then you have valid statistical table.

At the moment all that is obvious is well known in educational theory; working class children all over the western world do not do tertiary education.
How many Southend parents have been to University? Yes, the biggest predictor of how well a child does at school is home background, not the schools. So the figures which would be interesting is not merely the percentage of students who go to university but the match with percentage of parents who went. Then you have valid statistical table. At the moment all that is obvious is well known in educational theory; working class children all over the western world do not do tertiary education. Jack222
  • Score: -2

3:50pm Thu 3 Jul 14

Motherlode says...

Jack222 wrote:
How many Southend parents have been to University?

Yes, the biggest predictor of how well a child does at school is home background, not the schools.

So the figures which would be interesting is not merely the percentage of students who go to university but the match with percentage of parents who went. Then you have valid statistical table.

At the moment all that is obvious is well known in educational theory; working class children all over the western world do not do tertiary education.
Actually, that's an incorrect assumption. There are state schools in the UK in really deprived inner city areas where over 80% of the children go on to higher education. Camden & Southwark have fewer degree educated adults than Southend (you can get the figures from the ONS) yet they have schools where University is the norm at 18.
Parents education may show a correlation but that certainly does not imply causality.
[quote][p][bold]Jack222[/bold] wrote: How many Southend parents have been to University? Yes, the biggest predictor of how well a child does at school is home background, not the schools. So the figures which would be interesting is not merely the percentage of students who go to university but the match with percentage of parents who went. Then you have valid statistical table. At the moment all that is obvious is well known in educational theory; working class children all over the western world do not do tertiary education.[/p][/quote]Actually, that's an incorrect assumption. There are state schools in the UK in really deprived inner city areas where over 80% of the children go on to higher education. Camden & Southwark have fewer degree educated adults than Southend (you can get the figures from the ONS) yet they have schools where University is the norm at 18. Parents education may show a correlation but that certainly does not imply causality. Motherlode
  • Score: 5

5:10pm Thu 3 Jul 14

runwellian says...

Go to Uni, graduate, have a gap year then go on the dole ... that seems to be the pattern because the type of jobs these young want just aren't available!

It would be interesting to know how many people on job seekers or other benefits have been to Uni!
How many of them have turned down jobs because they think it is beneath them?
Go to Uni, graduate, have a gap year then go on the dole ... that seems to be the pattern because the type of jobs these young want just aren't available! It would be interesting to know how many people on job seekers or other benefits have been to Uni! How many of them have turned down jobs because they think it is beneath them? runwellian
  • Score: -2

12:12am Fri 4 Jul 14

jayman says...

Southends educational landscape has been blighted, perhaps irreversibly, by years of ideological tory administration. Grammar schools seem to be a highly aggressive and competitive system of supporting the educational interests of middle class families who utilise costly 11+ coaching. These children in turn receive an education proper. Children who receive an education with southends state schools, recive a rationed, watered down version of what's avaliable elsewhere. Their potential is unrealised, their hopes are dampened and their future is marked. Ishould it not time that we only use two words to define key stage education, "school" and "teach".
Southends educational landscape has been blighted, perhaps irreversibly, by years of ideological tory administration. Grammar schools seem to be a highly aggressive and competitive system of supporting the educational interests of middle class families who utilise costly 11+ coaching. These children in turn receive an education proper. Children who receive an education with southends state schools, recive a rationed, watered down version of what's avaliable elsewhere. Their potential is unrealised, their hopes are dampened and their future is marked. Ishould it not time that we only use two words to define key stage education, "school" and "teach". jayman
  • Score: 1

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