Inspector finds dirty and graffiti covered cells at Basildon and Southend courts

Echo: Inspector finds dirty and graffiti covered cells at Basildon and Southend courts Inspector finds dirty and graffiti covered cells at Basildon and Southend courts

BASILDON Crown Court has been told to clean up its act after an inspector found defendants were forced to use dirty cells covered in graffiti.

Nick Hardwick, chief inspector of prisons, found doors and benches at the crown court and Southend Magistrates Court covered in graffiti and were dirty.

He toured 11 courts in Essex and found there were overall staffing problems, the care of defendants should have been better and there was little training for safeguarding young and vulnerable people.

He also found Basildon Magistrates’ Court did not get rid of confidential waste properly so it could be seen by anyone entering the custody office.

He made more than 20 recommendations for HM Courts and Tribunal Service and Serco Winstanton, which had been contracted to provide custody and escort services.

A courts spokesman said: “We welcome the Inspectorate’s finding that custody staff treat detainees courteously and that physical conditions at most courts, including cleanliness, were good.

“HM Courts & Tribunals Service will be working closely with Serco and NOMS to deliver a joint action plan which addresses the Inspectorate’s recommendations as soon as possible.”

A Serco spokesman added that since the inspection in January 66 custody prison officers have been recruited, more training has been introduced and a Professional Standards Team has been introduced.

Comments (15)

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2:39pm Fri 11 Jul 14

Loosers says...

Oh dear - poor criminals forced to wait in dirty holding cells.

Time to get tough and send the message that crime does not pay. If you break the law, you will suffer. Bring in the Sergeant Majors to whip these waste of space people into shape.
Oh dear - poor criminals forced to wait in dirty holding cells. Time to get tough and send the message that crime does not pay. If you break the law, you will suffer. Bring in the Sergeant Majors to whip these waste of space people into shape. Loosers
  • Score: 13

2:51pm Fri 11 Jul 14

Jaimundo says...

Can't they get the criminals to clean them as part of their community service? Then next time they might think twice about vandalising them while waiting for their case to come up.
Can't they get the criminals to clean them as part of their community service? Then next time they might think twice about vandalising them while waiting for their case to come up. Jaimundo
  • Score: 11

3:02pm Fri 11 Jul 14

Steve H says...

Oh no what a shame, filthy criminals have to sit in filthy cells.

I for one do not want my tax to go towards this, make the scum clean them themselves.
Oh no what a shame, filthy criminals have to sit in filthy cells. I for one do not want my tax to go towards this, make the scum clean them themselves. Steve H
  • Score: 12

3:06pm Fri 11 Jul 14

Druggie Scumbag says...

Loosers wrote:
Oh dear - poor criminals forced to wait in dirty holding cells.

Time to get tough and send the message that crime does not pay. If you break the law, you will suffer. Bring in the Sergeant Majors to whip these waste of space people into shape.
Those being held in the substandard conditions are awaiting a court appearance. In general that means that they have yet to face trial. Therefore they must be considered innocent and not the 'poor criminals' you would have them branded.

Perhaps you will be wrongly accused of a crime one day. Would you not expect to be held in decent surroundings and treated courteously? It might go some little way to mitigating the fact that you should not have been in court in the first place.
[quote][p][bold]Loosers[/bold] wrote: Oh dear - poor criminals forced to wait in dirty holding cells. Time to get tough and send the message that crime does not pay. If you break the law, you will suffer. Bring in the Sergeant Majors to whip these waste of space people into shape.[/p][/quote]Those being held in the substandard conditions are awaiting a court appearance. In general that means that they have yet to face trial. Therefore they must be considered innocent and not the 'poor criminals' you would have them branded. Perhaps you will be wrongly accused of a crime one day. Would you not expect to be held in decent surroundings and treated courteously? It might go some little way to mitigating the fact that you should not have been in court in the first place. Druggie Scumbag
  • Score: -13

3:08pm Fri 11 Jul 14

Loosers says...

Druggie Scumbag wrote:
Loosers wrote:
Oh dear - poor criminals forced to wait in dirty holding cells.

Time to get tough and send the message that crime does not pay. If you break the law, you will suffer. Bring in the Sergeant Majors to whip these waste of space people into shape.
Those being held in the substandard conditions are awaiting a court appearance. In general that means that they have yet to face trial. Therefore they must be considered innocent and not the 'poor criminals' you would have them branded.

Perhaps you will be wrongly accused of a crime one day. Would you not expect to be held in decent surroundings and treated courteously? It might go some little way to mitigating the fact that you should not have been in court in the first place.
The percentage of people wrongly accused of a crime is likely to be very, very low. As with everything, the few will pay the price for the sins of the majority.
[quote][p][bold]Druggie Scumbag[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Loosers[/bold] wrote: Oh dear - poor criminals forced to wait in dirty holding cells. Time to get tough and send the message that crime does not pay. If you break the law, you will suffer. Bring in the Sergeant Majors to whip these waste of space people into shape.[/p][/quote]Those being held in the substandard conditions are awaiting a court appearance. In general that means that they have yet to face trial. Therefore they must be considered innocent and not the 'poor criminals' you would have them branded. Perhaps you will be wrongly accused of a crime one day. Would you not expect to be held in decent surroundings and treated courteously? It might go some little way to mitigating the fact that you should not have been in court in the first place.[/p][/quote]The percentage of people wrongly accused of a crime is likely to be very, very low. As with everything, the few will pay the price for the sins of the majority. Loosers
  • Score: 5

3:16pm Fri 11 Jul 14

Druggie Scumbag says...

Loosers wrote:
Druggie Scumbag wrote:
Loosers wrote:
Oh dear - poor criminals forced to wait in dirty holding cells.

Time to get tough and send the message that crime does not pay. If you break the law, you will suffer. Bring in the Sergeant Majors to whip these waste of space people into shape.
Those being held in the substandard conditions are awaiting a court appearance. In general that means that they have yet to face trial. Therefore they must be considered innocent and not the 'poor criminals' you would have them branded.

Perhaps you will be wrongly accused of a crime one day. Would you not expect to be held in decent surroundings and treated courteously? It might go some little way to mitigating the fact that you should not have been in court in the first place.
The percentage of people wrongly accused of a crime is likely to be very, very low. As with everything, the few will pay the price for the sins of the majority.
I completely agree with you. That is life. It doesn't make it right though.
[quote][p][bold]Loosers[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Druggie Scumbag[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Loosers[/bold] wrote: Oh dear - poor criminals forced to wait in dirty holding cells. Time to get tough and send the message that crime does not pay. If you break the law, you will suffer. Bring in the Sergeant Majors to whip these waste of space people into shape.[/p][/quote]Those being held in the substandard conditions are awaiting a court appearance. In general that means that they have yet to face trial. Therefore they must be considered innocent and not the 'poor criminals' you would have them branded. Perhaps you will be wrongly accused of a crime one day. Would you not expect to be held in decent surroundings and treated courteously? It might go some little way to mitigating the fact that you should not have been in court in the first place.[/p][/quote]The percentage of people wrongly accused of a crime is likely to be very, very low. As with everything, the few will pay the price for the sins of the majority.[/p][/quote]I completely agree with you. That is life. It doesn't make it right though. Druggie Scumbag
  • Score: -5

3:56pm Fri 11 Jul 14

danger2013 says...

Steve H wrote:
Oh no what a shame, filthy criminals have to sit in filthy cells.

I for one do not want my tax to go towards this, make the scum clean them themselves.
Not everyone in a court cell is a criminal. If you have a clean record and your awaiting trial your Innocent and not a criminal. So why should these people have to wait in dirty condition? Your the scum bag for judging!!! without the proper knowledge of what your talking about..
[quote][p][bold]Steve H[/bold] wrote: Oh no what a shame, filthy criminals have to sit in filthy cells. I for one do not want my tax to go towards this, make the scum clean them themselves.[/p][/quote]Not everyone in a court cell is a criminal. If you have a clean record and your awaiting trial your Innocent and not a criminal. So why should these people have to wait in dirty condition? Your the scum bag for judging!!! without the proper knowledge of what your talking about.. danger2013
  • Score: -8

4:22pm Fri 11 Jul 14

John Bull 40 says...

Druggie Scumbag wrote:
Loosers wrote:
Oh dear - poor criminals forced to wait in dirty holding cells.

Time to get tough and send the message that crime does not pay. If you break the law, you will suffer. Bring in the Sergeant Majors to whip these waste of space people into shape.
Those being held in the substandard conditions are awaiting a court appearance. In general that means that they have yet to face trial. Therefore they must be considered innocent and not the 'poor criminals' you would have them branded.

Perhaps you will be wrongly accused of a crime one day. Would you not expect to be held in decent surroundings and treated courteously? It might go some little way to mitigating the fact that you should not have been in court in the first place.
I am crying my eyes out just thinking about these poor people.
[quote][p][bold]Druggie Scumbag[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Loosers[/bold] wrote: Oh dear - poor criminals forced to wait in dirty holding cells. Time to get tough and send the message that crime does not pay. If you break the law, you will suffer. Bring in the Sergeant Majors to whip these waste of space people into shape.[/p][/quote]Those being held in the substandard conditions are awaiting a court appearance. In general that means that they have yet to face trial. Therefore they must be considered innocent and not the 'poor criminals' you would have them branded. Perhaps you will be wrongly accused of a crime one day. Would you not expect to be held in decent surroundings and treated courteously? It might go some little way to mitigating the fact that you should not have been in court in the first place.[/p][/quote]I am crying my eyes out just thinking about these poor people. John Bull 40
  • Score: 10

8:45pm Fri 11 Jul 14

Howard Cháse says...

Who is responsible for all that graffiti I wonder?

I don't suppose it's down to the court officials and other staff employed there....
Who is responsible for all that graffiti I wonder? I don't suppose it's down to the court officials and other staff employed there.... Howard Cháse
  • Score: 7

9:11pm Fri 11 Jul 14

LinfordsLunchbox says...

It wouldnt be hard to find out who did it, most of it is peoples full names they have scratched into the walls/benches/door frames
It wouldnt be hard to find out who did it, most of it is peoples full names they have scratched into the walls/benches/door frames LinfordsLunchbox
  • Score: 3

11:48pm Fri 11 Jul 14

Nebs says...

LinfordsLunchbox wrote:
It wouldnt be hard to find out who did it, most of it is peoples full names they have scratched into the walls/benches/door frames
Good point, add vandalism to the charge sheet.
[quote][p][bold]LinfordsLunchbox[/bold] wrote: It wouldnt be hard to find out who did it, most of it is peoples full names they have scratched into the walls/benches/door frames[/p][/quote]Good point, add vandalism to the charge sheet. Nebs
  • Score: 8

7:47am Sat 12 Jul 14

sesibollox says...

Id have rats running around, damp wall and dark cornered cells, for it adds to the punishment
Id have rats running around, damp wall and dark cornered cells, for it adds to the punishment sesibollox
  • Score: 6

8:52am Sat 12 Jul 14

blackheart says...

But dey is innocent at dat point innit?
But dey is innocent at dat point innit? blackheart
  • Score: -7

9:32am Sat 12 Jul 14

sesibollox says...

blackheart wrote:
But dey is innocent at dat point innit?
All scum, if you're in court..
[quote][p][bold]blackheart[/bold] wrote: But dey is innocent at dat point innit?[/p][/quote]All scum, if you're in court.. sesibollox
  • Score: 3

9:58am Sat 12 Jul 14

blackheart says...

sesibollox wrote:
blackheart wrote:
But dey is innocent at dat point innit?
All scum, if you're in court..
Proving once again your aptronym.
[quote][p][bold]sesibollox[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]blackheart[/bold] wrote: But dey is innocent at dat point innit?[/p][/quote]All scum, if you're in court..[/p][/quote]Proving once again your aptronym. blackheart
  • Score: 0
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