Plenty more fish in the sea? Call for action over declining fish stocks

Plenty more fish in the sea? Call for action over declining fish stocks

Plenty more fish in the sea? Call for action over declining fish stocks

First published in News by

FISHERMEN will meet environmental bodies to discuss declining fish stocks in the Thames Estuary “within weeks” as an MP again pressed ministers over the issue in the Commons.

The Marine Management Organisation, the Kent and Essex Inshore Fisheries and Conservation Authority and the Environment Agency will organise a workshop with industry leaders and experts to discuss stocks, as the amount of sole landed has more than halved in two years.

Southend West Tory MP David Amess and some fishermen have blamed the decline on the dredging of a channel up the estuary so large container ships can reach the new London Gateway superport at Corringham, although no causal link has been established.

The port’s owners, point to other factors, including new fishing techniques and an increase in fresh water, but support the meeting with local fishermen, regulators and UK Government scientists.

Calling for a Parliamentary debate on the dredging, Mr Amess said: “Leigh fishermen are complaining about the loss of their catch.

“I recently waded into the Thames Estuary – I cannot walk on water yet – and I saw Victorian cart tracks that have been exposed. Something is amiss with the Thames Estuary.”

AndrewLansley, leader of the House of Commons – who left Governnment in David Cameron’s reshuffle – said: “The Marine Management Organisation is aware of the concerns raised by fishermen about commercial fish stocks in the Thames.

“In the next few weeks, the Marine Management Organisation, the Kent and Essex Inshore Fisheries and Conservation Authority and the Environment Agency will organise a joint agency workshop to bring together industry leaders and experts to review the current state of key commercial fish stocks in the Thames.”

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2:55pm Thu 17 Jul 14

Russ13 says...

The Thames is a living thing, man-made influences aside, it will change over time and go through phases where fish stocks are high and low.

There were stories on here a while back saying that silt had been become non-existent in places, how's the silt now? We don't hear any more about that "catastrophe" waiting to happen. Could it be that the situation/nature recovered itself or maybe it was a few people just getting a little over excited?

In the 70s/80s the Thames was no more than a sewerage outlet and pretty unsafe to beach goers, since then it's become cleaner and our beaches have been awarded blue flags.

As the report says, fish stocks could be lower as we've had a few wet years which means the water is less salty and Sole don't like this type of environment.

What scientific basis are those concerned using for saying dredging has caused fish stocks to be lower? The shipping channel is a little deeper, that's a given but exactly what affect can that have fising stocks?

Forgive me for sounding cynical but could an already struggling industry be eyeing up the Superport for a payout?

Wasn't there a story not so long ago about a fisherman who was prosecuted for fishing over his quota? He might not be the only one doing this and that *could* be an explanation for dwinding fish stocks
The Thames is a living thing, man-made influences aside, it will change over time and go through phases where fish stocks are high and low. There were stories on here a while back saying that silt had been become non-existent in places, how's the silt now? We don't hear any more about that "catastrophe" waiting to happen. Could it be that the situation/nature recovered itself or maybe it was a few people just getting a little over excited? In the 70s/80s the Thames was no more than a sewerage outlet and pretty unsafe to beach goers, since then it's become cleaner and our beaches have been awarded blue flags. As the report says, fish stocks could be lower as we've had a few wet years which means the water is less salty and Sole don't like this type of environment. What scientific basis are those concerned using for saying dredging has caused fish stocks to be lower? The shipping channel is a little deeper, that's a given but exactly what affect can that have fising stocks? Forgive me for sounding cynical but could an already struggling industry be eyeing up the Superport for a payout? Wasn't there a story not so long ago about a fisherman who was prosecuted for fishing over his quota? He might not be the only one doing this and that *could* be an explanation for dwinding fish stocks Russ13
  • Score: 7

6:11pm Thu 17 Jul 14

sesibollox says...

Funny how the fishermen are quick to blame everyone, but themselves, they have been greedy, taking all the fish they can, this is the result, NO FISH.
Funny how the fishermen are quick to blame everyone, but themselves, they have been greedy, taking all the fish they can, this is the result, NO FISH. sesibollox
  • Score: 2

7:43pm Thu 17 Jul 14

iknowbetter says...

Quote from Russ:: "Forgive me for sounding cynical but could an already struggling industry be eyeing up the Superport for a payout?"

Pretty much spot on Russ,
Plenty of Bass, Flounder Eels and Skate this year, infact, Flounder and Eel have been a rarity the past 10 years in the Thames, so much so that Recreational anglers are banned from keeping any eels they catch, but the past few years have seen a healthy increase in the Eel population, as well as Flounder and Skate. The food chain for Sole is as healthy as ever, snotties which are a type of Ragworm and Lugworm are all showing in very healthy numbers.
Maybe that 20+ Ton of Sole that the Leigh fisherman, (name escapes me), illegally landed 3 years ago has had a major impact on the Sole population, and he is the one we heard about I'm sure there are many more so called Fisherman that just have not been caught yet, no pun intended!!
Quote from Russ:: "Forgive me for sounding cynical but could an already struggling industry be eyeing up the Superport for a payout?" Pretty much spot on Russ, Plenty of Bass, Flounder Eels and Skate this year, infact, Flounder and Eel have been a rarity the past 10 years in the Thames, so much so that Recreational anglers are banned from keeping any eels they catch, but the past few years have seen a healthy increase in the Eel population, as well as Flounder and Skate. The food chain for Sole is as healthy as ever, snotties which are a type of Ragworm and Lugworm are all showing in very healthy numbers. Maybe that 20+ Ton of Sole that the Leigh fisherman, (name escapes me), illegally landed 3 years ago has had a major impact on the Sole population, and he is the one we heard about I'm sure there are many more so called Fisherman that just have not been caught yet, no pun intended!! iknowbetter
  • Score: 5

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