Echo comment: Families must be told the truth

Echo comment: Families must be told the truth

Echo comment: Families must be told the truth

First published in News

CANVEY residents are understandably angry.

For months they have been told everything is being done to prevent flooding on the island.

But yet again they have been left knee-deep in water, with no answers to their questions and with very little information as to just what happened on Sunday.

People deserve as much information as possible.

For three days, they were led to believe the pumps on Canvey were off for 12 minutes after a lightning strike, despite their scepticism and repeated questions to the Environment Agency.

It has now emerged one of the pumping stations broke down for two hours during the flooding.

The Environment Agency said it made the information freely available by telling Canvey Island Town Council.

But posting the information on one small website does not make what went wrong clear to residents through every means possible, especially when questions by residents and the media are not being answered fully.

MP Rebecca Harris has asked for an investigation, and rightly so.

It is disappointing Canvey residents are not being told the full story without politicians or the Echo asking questions.

But at least answers are now forthcoming they can expect to get the truth they deserve.

Comments (11)

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1:31pm Sat 26 Jul 14

Sellies says...

just seen a dehumidifier for sale on gum tree an industrial one
just seen a dehumidifier for sale on gum tree an industrial one Sellies
  • Score: -4

4:12pm Sat 26 Jul 14

runwellian says...

If you choose to live so many feet below the water level, why are your surprised?
If you choose to live so many feet below the water level, why are your surprised? runwellian
  • Score: -3

4:15pm Sat 26 Jul 14

jayman says...

Convey needs is a central pump house which is manned 24/7. Huge sump tank, about three pumps (one as a reserve) should do the trick...
Convey needs is a central pump house which is manned 24/7. Huge sump tank, about three pumps (one as a reserve) should do the trick... jayman
  • Score: -5

4:50pm Sat 26 Jul 14

poortaxpayer says...

When a months rain falls in a few hours then the pumps would probably have been overwhelmed regardless.
When a months rain falls in a few hours then the pumps would probably have been overwhelmed regardless. poortaxpayer
  • Score: 1

7:43pm Sat 26 Jul 14

jayman says...

jayman wrote:
Convey needs is a central pump house which is manned 24/7. Huge sump tank, about three pumps (one as a reserve) should do the trick...
can quite understand why people would dislike a viable solution... Canvey needs a pump house and an underground holding tank...
[quote][p][bold]jayman[/bold] wrote: Convey needs is a central pump house which is manned 24/7. Huge sump tank, about three pumps (one as a reserve) should do the trick...[/p][/quote]can quite understand why people would dislike a viable solution... Canvey needs a pump house and an underground holding tank... jayman
  • Score: 0

7:52pm Sat 26 Jul 14

jayman says...

poortaxpayer wrote:
When a months rain falls in a few hours then the pumps would probably have been overwhelmed regardless.
nope... Look at this Victorian solution. still works to this day. After the south sewers completion, London experienced some of the heaviest rainfall ever recorded. Bazalgette's pumps sucked up every last drop. Modern engineering is pathetic... central pump houses are the solution.

https://www.youtube.
com/watch?v=16tF9rgO
R-8
[quote][p][bold]poortaxpayer[/bold] wrote: When a months rain falls in a few hours then the pumps would probably have been overwhelmed regardless.[/p][/quote]nope... Look at this Victorian solution. still works to this day. After the south sewers completion, London experienced some of the heaviest rainfall ever recorded. Bazalgette's pumps sucked up every last drop. Modern engineering is pathetic... central pump houses are the solution. https://www.youtube. com/watch?v=16tF9rgO R-8 jayman
  • Score: 1

12:05am Sun 27 Jul 14

Fab man says...

Bit rich the Echo saying that people should know the truth when they themselves have been known to bend the truth for ideological reasons in the past.
Bit rich the Echo saying that people should know the truth when they themselves have been known to bend the truth for ideological reasons in the past. Fab man
  • Score: 4

8:55am Sun 27 Jul 14

bazza 1 says...

jayman wrote:
poortaxpayer wrote:
When a months rain falls in a few hours then the pumps would probably have been overwhelmed regardless.
nope... Look at this Victorian solution. still works to this day. After the south sewers completion, London experienced some of the heaviest rainfall ever recorded. Bazalgette's pumps sucked up every last drop. Modern engineering is pathetic... central pump houses are the solution.

https://www.youtube.

com/watch?v=16tF9rgO

R-8
Sorry mate, but you are wrong. Those steam powered pumps are not working, and haven't for decades They are preserved for historical reasons. The actual pumping is done by huge,modern, electrical pumps. London has the added bonus of Thames Water being able to divert huge amounts of storm water directly into the river Thames, when the sewers get overwhelmed. This is going to change when the massive storm sewer they are constructing comes into service. Modern pumps are great, but they need to be backed up by reliable attendance by an Engineer when things go wrong. Usually the engineer is miles away when they go wrong, and it takes time to attend. That is what is wrong with the system. Not the equipment.
[quote][p][bold]jayman[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]poortaxpayer[/bold] wrote: When a months rain falls in a few hours then the pumps would probably have been overwhelmed regardless.[/p][/quote]nope... Look at this Victorian solution. still works to this day. After the south sewers completion, London experienced some of the heaviest rainfall ever recorded. Bazalgette's pumps sucked up every last drop. Modern engineering is pathetic... central pump houses are the solution. https://www.youtube. com/watch?v=16tF9rgO R-8[/p][/quote]Sorry mate, but you are wrong. Those steam powered pumps are not working, and haven't for decades They are preserved for historical reasons. The actual pumping is done by huge,modern, electrical pumps. London has the added bonus of Thames Water being able to divert huge amounts of storm water directly into the river Thames, when the sewers get overwhelmed. This is going to change when the massive storm sewer they are constructing comes into service. Modern pumps are great, but they need to be backed up by reliable attendance by an Engineer when things go wrong. Usually the engineer is miles away when they go wrong, and it takes time to attend. That is what is wrong with the system. Not the equipment. bazza 1
  • Score: 0

1:42pm Sun 27 Jul 14

jayman says...

bazza 1 wrote:
jayman wrote:
poortaxpayer wrote:
When a months rain falls in a few hours then the pumps would probably have been overwhelmed regardless.
nope... Look at this Victorian solution. still works to this day. After the south sewers completion, London experienced some of the heaviest rainfall ever recorded. Bazalgette's pumps sucked up every last drop. Modern engineering is pathetic... central pump houses are the solution.

https://www.youtube.


com/watch?v=16tF9rgO


R-8
Sorry mate, but you are wrong. Those steam powered pumps are not working, and haven't for decades They are preserved for historical reasons. The actual pumping is done by huge,modern, electrical pumps. London has the added bonus of Thames Water being able to divert huge amounts of storm water directly into the river Thames, when the sewers get overwhelmed. This is going to change when the massive storm sewer they are constructing comes into service. Modern pumps are great, but they need to be backed up by reliable attendance by an Engineer when things go wrong. Usually the engineer is miles away when they go wrong, and it takes time to attend. That is what is wrong with the system. Not the equipment.
I meant that in context. they still go up and down and they have not rusted/fallen apart/burst into a ball of flames/perished under the shattering stress of a single wet wipe as with today's pumps.

Crossness pumping station was in operation from its cylinder upgrade in 1901 till the 1950's. that's 49 years of operation under the same design. im not suggesting the instillation of antiquated steam pumps, but anything has to be better then the cr*p in situ.

perhaps electric piston sump pumps situated at a central location. follow the design that 'works' with a modern twist....
[quote][p][bold]bazza 1[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]jayman[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]poortaxpayer[/bold] wrote: When a months rain falls in a few hours then the pumps would probably have been overwhelmed regardless.[/p][/quote]nope... Look at this Victorian solution. still works to this day. After the south sewers completion, London experienced some of the heaviest rainfall ever recorded. Bazalgette's pumps sucked up every last drop. Modern engineering is pathetic... central pump houses are the solution. https://www.youtube. com/watch?v=16tF9rgO R-8[/p][/quote]Sorry mate, but you are wrong. Those steam powered pumps are not working, and haven't for decades They are preserved for historical reasons. The actual pumping is done by huge,modern, electrical pumps. London has the added bonus of Thames Water being able to divert huge amounts of storm water directly into the river Thames, when the sewers get overwhelmed. This is going to change when the massive storm sewer they are constructing comes into service. Modern pumps are great, but they need to be backed up by reliable attendance by an Engineer when things go wrong. Usually the engineer is miles away when they go wrong, and it takes time to attend. That is what is wrong with the system. Not the equipment.[/p][/quote]I meant that in context. they still go up and down and they have not rusted/fallen apart/burst into a ball of flames/perished under the shattering stress of a single wet wipe as with today's pumps. Crossness pumping station was in operation from its cylinder upgrade in 1901 till the 1950's. that's 49 years of operation under the same design. im not suggesting the instillation of antiquated steam pumps, but anything has to be better then the cr*p in situ. perhaps electric piston sump pumps situated at a central location. follow the design that 'works' with a modern twist.... jayman
  • Score: 1

5:30pm Sun 27 Jul 14

maxell says...

echo this must be the most hypercritical headline you have ever published people need the truth from you, on all subjects not just the ones you dcide , floods pollution, noise , airport, this is why you are in my opinion a non credible news supplier.
echo this must be the most hypercritical headline you have ever published people need the truth from you, on all subjects not just the ones you dcide , floods pollution, noise , airport, this is why you are in my opinion a non credible news supplier. maxell
  • Score: 3

9:48pm Sun 27 Jul 14

Foyle1 says...

For anyone seriously interested, the storm water drains on Canvey have very little fall to the pump suction, this makes regular cleaning very important. When did anyone last see a gulley sucker working on the Island?

Castle Point Borough Council used to employ a team of 4 men to maintain and clean these drains including all the road gully pots. This stopped about 1996 when Essex County Council assumed responsibility for highways maintenance. The drains have not been properly maintained since.
For anyone seriously interested, the storm water drains on Canvey have very little fall to the pump suction, this makes regular cleaning very important. When did anyone last see a gulley sucker working on the Island? Castle Point Borough Council used to employ a team of 4 men to maintain and clean these drains including all the road gully pots. This stopped about 1996 when Essex County Council assumed responsibility for highways maintenance. The drains have not been properly maintained since. Foyle1
  • Score: 0

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