Premiums up for insurance following floods

Premiums up for insurance following floods

Premiums up for insurance following floods

First published in News

FLOOD-HIT home owners across the country have seen insurance excesses rocket to £20,000 in the most drastic cases and there are now fears Canvey residents could be in the same boat.

The warnings come after one Canvey couple revealed they have been quoted an excess of almost £5,000 following the floods.

Hundreds of residents are already counting the cost of damages for ruined carpets and furniture, but could now face an increase in their insurance premiums and excesses.

Mr and Mrs Herd, who were flooded for the first time in August last year, said: “We have received from our insurers their renewal notice which specifies an excess of £4,950.00 for each and any further claims made for loss or damage by floods.”

Paul Cobbing, chief executive of charity National Flood Forum, said: “In the worst cases we have seen excesses of £20,000.

“It is very variable, some people find their premiums and excesses don’t go up at all, others will find they go sky high, and everything in between, but a lot of people will find their premiums or excesses go up.”

He stressed that people should not just accept higher premiums and should shop around by ringing insurance companies directly rather than using comparison sites.

He added that people must also check the fine print of their cover to ensure it is what they need.

The Environment Agency has not yet decided whether it will pay compensation following Sunday’s floods as it is waiting for the results of the independent inquiry.

Comments (10)

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10:37am Mon 28 Jul 14

poortaxpayer says...

What do you expect when you live below sea level in a high risk flood area. Build new houses on stilts.
What do you expect when you live below sea level in a high risk flood area. Build new houses on stilts. poortaxpayer
  • Score: 3

10:55am Mon 28 Jul 14

Russ13 says...

Whilst I don't have a lot of sympathy for insurance companies who seem to do their best to wriggle out of claims on the smallest of technicalities, if they're having to pay for flood damage to be rectified every few months they're not going to be able keep their businesses profitable.

There's no easy answer, there are places that flood that perhaps shouldn't (poor/blocked drainage or other man-made issues causing the flooding) and there are some homes that are right on a flood-plane. Either way, that's not the insurance company's problem.

As an alternative, maybe those who have been flooded or are at risk of flooding should consider preventative measures which can stop water ingress into their homes?

It isn't cheap but in the long term it could save money, not to mention the inconvenience and heartache of having your home and possessins ruined.
Whilst I don't have a lot of sympathy for insurance companies who seem to do their best to wriggle out of claims on the smallest of technicalities, if they're having to pay for flood damage to be rectified every few months they're not going to be able keep their businesses profitable. There's no easy answer, there are places that flood that perhaps shouldn't (poor/blocked drainage or other man-made issues causing the flooding) and there are some homes that are right on a flood-plane. Either way, that's not the insurance company's problem. As an alternative, maybe those who have been flooded or are at risk of flooding should consider preventative measures which can stop water ingress into their homes? It isn't cheap but in the long term it could save money, not to mention the inconvenience and heartache of having your home and possessins ruined. Russ13
  • Score: 0

12:13pm Mon 28 Jul 14

Ian P says...

poortaxpayer wrote:
What do you expect when you live below sea level in a high risk flood area. Build new houses on stilts.
Many of the original properties built on Canvey were actually raised. They were built standing on brick pillars. My grandparents lived in one of the original bungalows in Maurice Road and there was a void about three foot high between the land and the underside of the floor. Clearly it did not stop flooding in 1953, but flooding like we have seen recently was never an issue.
[quote][p][bold]poortaxpayer[/bold] wrote: What do you expect when you live below sea level in a high risk flood area. Build new houses on stilts.[/p][/quote]Many of the original properties built on Canvey were actually raised. They were built standing on brick pillars. My grandparents lived in one of the original bungalows in Maurice Road and there was a void about three foot high between the land and the underside of the floor. Clearly it did not stop flooding in 1953, but flooding like we have seen recently was never an issue. Ian P
  • Score: 2

12:19pm Mon 28 Jul 14

rayleigh123 says...

Nothing to do with Canvey Island because builders are putting up properties all over the county in areas which are known to flood.

OK it maybe a once in a 5 / 10 year event but they still flood.

So who gives them permission to build - the local council.

At the end of the day they must be held to account.

.
.
Nothing to do with Canvey Island because builders are putting up properties all over the county in areas which are known to flood. OK it maybe a once in a 5 / 10 year event but they still flood. So who gives them permission to build - the local council. At the end of the day they must be held to account. . . rayleigh123
  • Score: 0

1:33pm Mon 28 Jul 14

John Right says...

Never build a house with a downward sloping driveway leading to your property, likewise never build a house lower than the road outside.
It was due to these two fundamental flaws that so many got a good soaking.
Paving over the natural soak area such as patios, only compounds the problems.
Prime example as seen on Canvey ...
Never build a house with a downward sloping driveway leading to your property, likewise never build a house lower than the road outside. It was due to these two fundamental flaws that so many got a good soaking. Paving over the natural soak area such as patios, only compounds the problems. Prime example as seen on Canvey ... John Right
  • Score: 2

2:21pm Mon 28 Jul 14

rayleigh123 says...

John Right wrote:
Never build a house with a downward sloping driveway leading to your property, likewise never build a house lower than the road outside. It was due to these two fundamental flaws that so many got a good soaking. Paving over the natural soak area such as patios, only compounds the problems. Prime example as seen on Canvey ...
---- Never build a house with a downward sloping driveway leading to your property, -- Very good advice but around where i live they would build in the middle of a roundabout if they think they can get away with it.

If you know where the old EON building was in Rayleigh, they have built umpteen houses on that site. In the middle is a big brooke that floods in heavy rain, a number of the houses are downhill from the brooke.

A problem waiting to happen.


.
.
[quote][p][bold]John Right[/bold] wrote: Never build a house with a downward sloping driveway leading to your property, likewise never build a house lower than the road outside. It was due to these two fundamental flaws that so many got a good soaking. Paving over the natural soak area such as patios, only compounds the problems. Prime example as seen on Canvey ...[/p][/quote]---- Never build a house with a downward sloping driveway leading to your property, -- Very good advice but around where i live they would build in the middle of a roundabout if they think they can get away with it. If you know where the old EON building was in Rayleigh, they have built umpteen houses on that site. In the middle is a big brooke that floods in heavy rain, a number of the houses are downhill from the brooke. A problem waiting to happen. . . rayleigh123
  • Score: 0

2:35pm Mon 28 Jul 14

John Right says...

rayleigh123 wrote:
Nothing to do with Canvey Island because builders are putting up properties all over the county in areas which are known to flood.

OK it maybe a once in a 5 / 10 year event but they still flood.

So who gives them permission to build - the local council.

At the end of the day they must be held to account.

.
.
Land survey reports should be looked at methodically by the new buyers of such properties
[quote][p][bold]rayleigh123[/bold] wrote: Nothing to do with Canvey Island because builders are putting up properties all over the county in areas which are known to flood. OK it maybe a once in a 5 / 10 year event but they still flood. So who gives them permission to build - the local council. At the end of the day they must be held to account. . .[/p][/quote]Land survey reports should be looked at methodically by the new buyers of such properties John Right
  • Score: 3

2:38pm Mon 28 Jul 14

Nebs says...

People who live in houses that are in low risk or no risk flood areas already subsidise the high risk buyers, looks like that subsidy is going up.

A free market in flood insurance would settle down some of the silly house price increases.
People who live in houses that are in low risk or no risk flood areas already subsidise the high risk buyers, looks like that subsidy is going up. A free market in flood insurance would settle down some of the silly house price increases. Nebs
  • Score: 0

2:47pm Mon 28 Jul 14

John Right says...

rayleigh123 wrote:
John Right wrote:
Never build a house with a downward sloping driveway leading to your property, likewise never build a house lower than the road outside. It was due to these two fundamental flaws that so many got a good soaking. Paving over the natural soak area such as patios, only compounds the problems. Prime example as seen on Canvey ...
---- Never build a house with a downward sloping driveway leading to your property, -- Very good advice but around where i live they would build in the middle of a roundabout if they think they can get away with it.

If you know where the old EON building was in Rayleigh, they have built umpteen houses on that site. In the middle is a big brooke that floods in heavy rain, a number of the houses are downhill from the brooke.

A problem waiting to happen.


.
.
More fool the buyers, they had a choice...
[quote][p][bold]rayleigh123[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]John Right[/bold] wrote: Never build a house with a downward sloping driveway leading to your property, likewise never build a house lower than the road outside. It was due to these two fundamental flaws that so many got a good soaking. Paving over the natural soak area such as patios, only compounds the problems. Prime example as seen on Canvey ...[/p][/quote]---- Never build a house with a downward sloping driveway leading to your property, -- Very good advice but around where i live they would build in the middle of a roundabout if they think they can get away with it. If you know where the old EON building was in Rayleigh, they have built umpteen houses on that site. In the middle is a big brooke that floods in heavy rain, a number of the houses are downhill from the brooke. A problem waiting to happen. . .[/p][/quote]More fool the buyers, they had a choice... John Right
  • Score: 1

3:06pm Mon 28 Jul 14

VeteranOfMany says...

John Right wrote:
rayleigh123 wrote:
John Right wrote:
Never build a house with a downward sloping driveway leading to your property, likewise never build a house lower than the road outside. It was due to these two fundamental flaws that so many got a good soaking. Paving over the natural soak area such as patios, only compounds the problems. Prime example as seen on Canvey ...
---- Never build a house with a downward sloping driveway leading to your property, -- Very good advice but around where i live they would build in the middle of a roundabout if they think they can get away with it.

If you know where the old EON building was in Rayleigh, they have built umpteen houses on that site. In the middle is a big brooke that floods in heavy rain, a number of the houses are downhill from the brooke.

A problem waiting to happen.


.
.
More fool the buyers, they had a choice...
Live on high ground..
[quote][p][bold]John Right[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]rayleigh123[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]John Right[/bold] wrote: Never build a house with a downward sloping driveway leading to your property, likewise never build a house lower than the road outside. It was due to these two fundamental flaws that so many got a good soaking. Paving over the natural soak area such as patios, only compounds the problems. Prime example as seen on Canvey ...[/p][/quote]---- Never build a house with a downward sloping driveway leading to your property, -- Very good advice but around where i live they would build in the middle of a roundabout if they think they can get away with it. If you know where the old EON building was in Rayleigh, they have built umpteen houses on that site. In the middle is a big brooke that floods in heavy rain, a number of the houses are downhill from the brooke. A problem waiting to happen. . .[/p][/quote]More fool the buyers, they had a choice...[/p][/quote]Live on high ground.. VeteranOfMany
  • Score: 2

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