Police appeal after snowball attack

POLICE are investigating a snowball attack on a Canvey cyclist.

The man had been riding his bike along Somnes Avenue at about 1.40pm on January 20 when a group of youngsters threw snowballs at him and forced him to stop.

He was then punched and kicked by some of the youths. They also took his bike but dumped it further down the road.

The victim, a 20 year-old local man, was unharmed but badly shaken.

Anyone who can help should contact PC Paul Ledger at Rayleigh police station on 101.

Comments (21)

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5:05pm Fri 1 Feb 13

upset says...

Surely it was more important that he got kicked and punch rather than snow balls thrown for a headline.
Surely it was more important that he got kicked and punch rather than snow balls thrown for a headline. upset

6:58pm Fri 1 Feb 13

pendulum says...

More like an assault and theft...
More like an assault and theft... pendulum

7:24pm Fri 1 Feb 13

emcee says...

The Echo really have no idea how to report the news, do they?
OK, so use the "snowballs" fact as part of the description of how the attack happened but to use it as a headline is purely amateurish.
It makes me wonder if they have school children somwhere trying to think up exciting headlines.
Good headlines sell papers. I wonder how well Echo sales are these days because I doubt it is the headlines that are selling the papers.
The Echo really have no idea how to report the news, do they? OK, so use the "snowballs" fact as part of the description of how the attack happened but to use it as a headline is purely amateurish. It makes me wonder if they have school children somwhere trying to think up exciting headlines. Good headlines sell papers. I wonder how well Echo sales are these days because I doubt it is the headlines that are selling the papers. emcee

7:49pm Fri 1 Feb 13

John T Pharro says...

upset wrote:
Surely it was more important that he got kicked and punch rather than snow balls thrown for a headline.
Spot on.
[quote][p][bold]upset[/bold] wrote: Surely it was more important that he got kicked and punch rather than snow balls thrown for a headline.[/p][/quote]Spot on. John T Pharro

8:14pm Fri 1 Feb 13

maddriver says...

emcee wrote:
The Echo really have no idea how to report the news, do they?
OK, so use the "snowballs" fact as part of the description of how the attack happened but to use it as a headline is purely amateurish.
It makes me wonder if they have school children somwhere trying to think up exciting headlines.
Good headlines sell papers. I wonder how well Echo sales are these days because I doubt it is the headlines that are selling the papers.
A comment that shows you have absolutely no idea of the workings of newspapers. No idea of journalistic procedures and nothing better to do than pick holes in something of which you know nothing.
[quote][p][bold]emcee[/bold] wrote: The Echo really have no idea how to report the news, do they? OK, so use the "snowballs" fact as part of the description of how the attack happened but to use it as a headline is purely amateurish. It makes me wonder if they have school children somwhere trying to think up exciting headlines. Good headlines sell papers. I wonder how well Echo sales are these days because I doubt it is the headlines that are selling the papers.[/p][/quote]A comment that shows you have absolutely no idea of the workings of newspapers. No idea of journalistic procedures and nothing better to do than pick holes in something of which you know nothing. maddriver

8:36pm Fri 1 Feb 13

John T Pharro says...

maddriver wrote:
emcee wrote:
The Echo really have no idea how to report the news, do they?
OK, so use the "snowballs" fact as part of the description of how the attack happened but to use it as a headline is purely amateurish.
It makes me wonder if they have school children somwhere trying to think up exciting headlines.
Good headlines sell papers. I wonder how well Echo sales are these days because I doubt it is the headlines that are selling the papers.
A comment that shows you have absolutely no idea of the workings of newspapers. No idea of journalistic procedures and nothing better to do than pick holes in something of which you know nothing.
So explain how the "workings of newspapers and journalistic procedures" apply here? The headline refers to a "snowball attack" as being the reason for the police appeal, not the far greater crimes of assault and theft,
[quote][p][bold]maddriver[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]emcee[/bold] wrote: The Echo really have no idea how to report the news, do they? OK, so use the "snowballs" fact as part of the description of how the attack happened but to use it as a headline is purely amateurish. It makes me wonder if they have school children somwhere trying to think up exciting headlines. Good headlines sell papers. I wonder how well Echo sales are these days because I doubt it is the headlines that are selling the papers.[/p][/quote]A comment that shows you have absolutely no idea of the workings of newspapers. No idea of journalistic procedures and nothing better to do than pick holes in something of which you know nothing.[/p][/quote]So explain how the "workings of newspapers and journalistic procedures" apply here? The headline refers to a "snowball attack" as being the reason for the police appeal, not the far greater crimes of assault and theft, John T Pharro

8:42pm Fri 1 Feb 13

Carnabackable says...

Fancy wishing to go for a cycle ride, in the snow, car drivers worst nightmare
Fancy wishing to go for a cycle ride, in the snow, car drivers worst nightmare Carnabackable

8:58pm Fri 1 Feb 13

maddriver says...

John T Pharro wrote:
maddriver wrote:
emcee wrote:
The Echo really have no idea how to report the news, do they?
OK, so use the "snowballs" fact as part of the description of how the attack happened but to use it as a headline is purely amateurish.
It makes me wonder if they have school children somwhere trying to think up exciting headlines.
Good headlines sell papers. I wonder how well Echo sales are these days because I doubt it is the headlines that are selling the papers.
A comment that shows you have absolutely no idea of the workings of newspapers. No idea of journalistic procedures and nothing better to do than pick holes in something of which you know nothing.
So explain how the "workings of newspapers and journalistic procedures" apply here? The headline refers to a "snowball attack" as being the reason for the police appeal, not the far greater crimes of assault and theft,
Headlines are important to draw attention to a story. They must focus on a point which draws that attention.
The story here states quite clearly what happened and the headline has merely done it's job of highlighting a certain point which was relevant as snow was on the ground at the time.
The real point to be made here is that someone is taking the main point of the story away and trying to be clever.
Read any daily newspaper and you will see headlines of this nature. Perhaps you only read the Echo online because it's free.
[quote][p][bold]John T Pharro[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]maddriver[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]emcee[/bold] wrote: The Echo really have no idea how to report the news, do they? OK, so use the "snowballs" fact as part of the description of how the attack happened but to use it as a headline is purely amateurish. It makes me wonder if they have school children somwhere trying to think up exciting headlines. Good headlines sell papers. I wonder how well Echo sales are these days because I doubt it is the headlines that are selling the papers.[/p][/quote]A comment that shows you have absolutely no idea of the workings of newspapers. No idea of journalistic procedures and nothing better to do than pick holes in something of which you know nothing.[/p][/quote]So explain how the "workings of newspapers and journalistic procedures" apply here? The headline refers to a "snowball attack" as being the reason for the police appeal, not the far greater crimes of assault and theft,[/p][/quote]Headlines are important to draw attention to a story. They must focus on a point which draws that attention. The story here states quite clearly what happened and the headline has merely done it's job of highlighting a certain point which was relevant as snow was on the ground at the time. The real point to be made here is that someone is taking the main point of the story away and trying to be clever. Read any daily newspaper and you will see headlines of this nature. Perhaps you only read the Echo online because it's free. maddriver

9:11pm Fri 1 Feb 13

Curbishly says...

"Headlines are important to draw attention to a story"....

Are you as boring as this in the real world?
"Headlines are important to draw attention to a story".... Are you as boring as this in the real world? Curbishly

9:13am Sat 2 Feb 13

maddriver says...

Curbishly wrote:
"Headlines are important to draw attention to a story"....

Are you as boring as this in the real world?
I was asked to explain something and I did. Maybe I'm not half as boring as those who find it necessary to comment on any and everything, even if the only thing they can find to say is a criticism of the Echo.
[quote][p][bold]Curbishly[/bold] wrote: "Headlines are important to draw attention to a story".... Are you as boring as this in the real world?[/p][/quote]I was asked to explain something and I did. Maybe I'm not half as boring as those who find it necessary to comment on any and everything, even if the only thing they can find to say is a criticism of the Echo. maddriver

12:54pm Sat 2 Feb 13

DogsMessInLeigh says...

whats wrong with the headline...?

'police'...ok with that part...'appeal'...we
ll the police are appealing....and snowball attack...what started as a snowball attack turned in to more physical violence...hence police appeal after snowball attack....simple enough headline., and lets face it it caught some attention so must be something right in it.
whats wrong with the headline...? 'police'...ok with that part...'appeal'...we ll the police are appealing....and snowball attack...what started as a snowball attack turned in to more physical violence...hence police appeal after snowball attack....simple enough headline., and lets face it it caught some attention so must be something right in it. DogsMessInLeigh

2:09pm Sat 2 Feb 13

upset says...

John T Pharro wrote:
maddriver wrote:
emcee wrote:
The Echo really have no idea how to report the news, do they?
OK, so use the "snowballs" fact as part of the description of how the attack happened but to use it as a headline is purely amateurish.
It makes me wonder if they have school children somwhere trying to think up exciting headlines.
Good headlines sell papers. I wonder how well Echo sales are these days because I doubt it is the headlines that are selling the papers.
A comment that shows you have absolutely no idea of the workings of newspapers. No idea of journalistic procedures and nothing better to do than pick holes in something of which you know nothing.
So explain how the "workings of newspapers and journalistic procedures" apply here? The headline refers to a "snowball attack" as being the reason for the police appeal, not the far greater crimes of assault and theft,
Here Here!!
[quote][p][bold]John T Pharro[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]maddriver[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]emcee[/bold] wrote: The Echo really have no idea how to report the news, do they? OK, so use the "snowballs" fact as part of the description of how the attack happened but to use it as a headline is purely amateurish. It makes me wonder if they have school children somwhere trying to think up exciting headlines. Good headlines sell papers. I wonder how well Echo sales are these days because I doubt it is the headlines that are selling the papers.[/p][/quote]A comment that shows you have absolutely no idea of the workings of newspapers. No idea of journalistic procedures and nothing better to do than pick holes in something of which you know nothing.[/p][/quote]So explain how the "workings of newspapers and journalistic procedures" apply here? The headline refers to a "snowball attack" as being the reason for the police appeal, not the far greater crimes of assault and theft,[/p][/quote]Here Here!! upset

2:26pm Sat 2 Feb 13

John T Pharro says...

maddriver wrote:
John T Pharro wrote:
maddriver wrote:
emcee wrote:
The Echo really have no idea how to report the news, do they?
OK, so use the "snowballs" fact as part of the description of how the attack happened but to use it as a headline is purely amateurish.
It makes me wonder if they have school children somwhere trying to think up exciting headlines.
Good headlines sell papers. I wonder how well Echo sales are these days because I doubt it is the headlines that are selling the papers.
A comment that shows you have absolutely no idea of the workings of newspapers. No idea of journalistic procedures and nothing better to do than pick holes in something of which you know nothing.
So explain how the "workings of newspapers and journalistic procedures" apply here? The headline refers to a "snowball attack" as being the reason for the police appeal, not the far greater crimes of assault and theft,
Headlines are important to draw attention to a story. They must focus on a point which draws that attention.
The story here states quite clearly what happened and the headline has merely done it's job of highlighting a certain point which was relevant as snow was on the ground at the time.
The real point to be made here is that someone is taking the main point of the story away and trying to be clever.
Read any daily newspaper and you will see headlines of this nature. Perhaps you only read the Echo online because it's free.
Well thanks for the explanation, but that the snowball attack is important is more than a bit mute. The first paragraph states "Police investigating a snowball attack on a Canvey cyclists". No they are not, or I hope not. I hope they investigating the assault and theft.
It a totally misleading headline and a really poor standard of journalism. Do you agree?
[quote][p][bold]maddriver[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]John T Pharro[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]maddriver[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]emcee[/bold] wrote: The Echo really have no idea how to report the news, do they? OK, so use the "snowballs" fact as part of the description of how the attack happened but to use it as a headline is purely amateurish. It makes me wonder if they have school children somwhere trying to think up exciting headlines. Good headlines sell papers. I wonder how well Echo sales are these days because I doubt it is the headlines that are selling the papers.[/p][/quote]A comment that shows you have absolutely no idea of the workings of newspapers. No idea of journalistic procedures and nothing better to do than pick holes in something of which you know nothing.[/p][/quote]So explain how the "workings of newspapers and journalistic procedures" apply here? The headline refers to a "snowball attack" as being the reason for the police appeal, not the far greater crimes of assault and theft,[/p][/quote]Headlines are important to draw attention to a story. They must focus on a point which draws that attention. The story here states quite clearly what happened and the headline has merely done it's job of highlighting a certain point which was relevant as snow was on the ground at the time. The real point to be made here is that someone is taking the main point of the story away and trying to be clever. Read any daily newspaper and you will see headlines of this nature. Perhaps you only read the Echo online because it's free.[/p][/quote]Well thanks for the explanation, but that the snowball attack is important is more than a bit mute. The first paragraph states "Police investigating a snowball attack on a Canvey cyclists". No they are not, or I hope not. I hope they investigating the assault and theft. It a totally misleading headline and a really poor standard of journalism. Do you agree? John T Pharro

3:58pm Sat 2 Feb 13

maddriver says...

John T Pharro wrote:
maddriver wrote:
John T Pharro wrote:
maddriver wrote:
emcee wrote:
The Echo really have no idea how to report the news, do they?
OK, so use the "snowballs" fact as part of the description of how the attack happened but to use it as a headline is purely amateurish.
It makes me wonder if they have school children somwhere trying to think up exciting headlines.
Good headlines sell papers. I wonder how well Echo sales are these days because I doubt it is the headlines that are selling the papers.
A comment that shows you have absolutely no idea of the workings of newspapers. No idea of journalistic procedures and nothing better to do than pick holes in something of which you know nothing.
So explain how the "workings of newspapers and journalistic procedures" apply here? The headline refers to a "snowball attack" as being the reason for the police appeal, not the far greater crimes of assault and theft,
Headlines are important to draw attention to a story. They must focus on a point which draws that attention.
The story here states quite clearly what happened and the headline has merely done it's job of highlighting a certain point which was relevant as snow was on the ground at the time.
The real point to be made here is that someone is taking the main point of the story away and trying to be clever.
Read any daily newspaper and you will see headlines of this nature. Perhaps you only read the Echo online because it's free.
Well thanks for the explanation, but that the snowball attack is important is more than a bit mute. The first paragraph states "Police investigating a snowball attack on a Canvey cyclists". No they are not, or I hope not. I hope they investigating the assault and theft.
It a totally misleading headline and a really poor standard of journalism. Do you agree?
No I don't. The headline is there merely to give a brief idea of a story and all journalists are trained to "make the headline count," in other words to let the headline draw attention to a story.
The headline is not intended to represent the story but to draw attention to it.
Look through any newspaper and you will see this principle in action.
[quote][p][bold]John T Pharro[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]maddriver[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]John T Pharro[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]maddriver[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]emcee[/bold] wrote: The Echo really have no idea how to report the news, do they? OK, so use the "snowballs" fact as part of the description of how the attack happened but to use it as a headline is purely amateurish. It makes me wonder if they have school children somwhere trying to think up exciting headlines. Good headlines sell papers. I wonder how well Echo sales are these days because I doubt it is the headlines that are selling the papers.[/p][/quote]A comment that shows you have absolutely no idea of the workings of newspapers. No idea of journalistic procedures and nothing better to do than pick holes in something of which you know nothing.[/p][/quote]So explain how the "workings of newspapers and journalistic procedures" apply here? The headline refers to a "snowball attack" as being the reason for the police appeal, not the far greater crimes of assault and theft,[/p][/quote]Headlines are important to draw attention to a story. They must focus on a point which draws that attention. The story here states quite clearly what happened and the headline has merely done it's job of highlighting a certain point which was relevant as snow was on the ground at the time. The real point to be made here is that someone is taking the main point of the story away and trying to be clever. Read any daily newspaper and you will see headlines of this nature. Perhaps you only read the Echo online because it's free.[/p][/quote]Well thanks for the explanation, but that the snowball attack is important is more than a bit mute. The first paragraph states "Police investigating a snowball attack on a Canvey cyclists". No they are not, or I hope not. I hope they investigating the assault and theft. It a totally misleading headline and a really poor standard of journalism. Do you agree?[/p][/quote]No I don't. The headline is there merely to give a brief idea of a story and all journalists are trained to "make the headline count," in other words to let the headline draw attention to a story. The headline is not intended to represent the story but to draw attention to it. Look through any newspaper and you will see this principle in action. maddriver

4:36pm Sat 2 Feb 13

whataday says...

maddriver wrote:
John T Pharro wrote:
maddriver wrote:
John T Pharro wrote:
maddriver wrote:
emcee wrote:
The Echo really have no idea how to report the news, do they?
OK, so use the "snowballs" fact as part of the description of how the attack happened but to use it as a headline is purely amateurish.
It makes me wonder if they have school children somwhere trying to think up exciting headlines.
Good headlines sell papers. I wonder how well Echo sales are these days because I doubt it is the headlines that are selling the papers.
A comment that shows you have absolutely no idea of the workings of newspapers. No idea of journalistic procedures and nothing better to do than pick holes in something of which you know nothing.
So explain how the "workings of newspapers and journalistic procedures" apply here? The headline refers to a "snowball attack" as being the reason for the police appeal, not the far greater crimes of assault and theft,
Headlines are important to draw attention to a story. They must focus on a point which draws that attention.
The story here states quite clearly what happened and the headline has merely done it's job of highlighting a certain point which was relevant as snow was on the ground at the time.
The real point to be made here is that someone is taking the main point of the story away and trying to be clever.
Read any daily newspaper and you will see headlines of this nature. Perhaps you only read the Echo online because it's free.
Well thanks for the explanation, but that the snowball attack is important is more than a bit mute. The first paragraph states "Police investigating a snowball attack on a Canvey cyclists". No they are not, or I hope not. I hope they investigating the assault and theft.
It a totally misleading headline and a really poor standard of journalism. Do you agree?
No I don't. The headline is there merely to give a brief idea of a story and all journalists are trained to "make the headline count," in other words to let the headline draw attention to a story.
The headline is not intended to represent the story but to draw attention to it.
Look through any newspaper and you will see this principle in action.
Then surely the headlines should have been Police appeal after thugs assualt and steal from cyclist
[quote][p][bold]maddriver[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]John T Pharro[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]maddriver[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]John T Pharro[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]maddriver[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]emcee[/bold] wrote: The Echo really have no idea how to report the news, do they? OK, so use the "snowballs" fact as part of the description of how the attack happened but to use it as a headline is purely amateurish. It makes me wonder if they have school children somwhere trying to think up exciting headlines. Good headlines sell papers. I wonder how well Echo sales are these days because I doubt it is the headlines that are selling the papers.[/p][/quote]A comment that shows you have absolutely no idea of the workings of newspapers. No idea of journalistic procedures and nothing better to do than pick holes in something of which you know nothing.[/p][/quote]So explain how the "workings of newspapers and journalistic procedures" apply here? The headline refers to a "snowball attack" as being the reason for the police appeal, not the far greater crimes of assault and theft,[/p][/quote]Headlines are important to draw attention to a story. They must focus on a point which draws that attention. The story here states quite clearly what happened and the headline has merely done it's job of highlighting a certain point which was relevant as snow was on the ground at the time. The real point to be made here is that someone is taking the main point of the story away and trying to be clever. Read any daily newspaper and you will see headlines of this nature. Perhaps you only read the Echo online because it's free.[/p][/quote]Well thanks for the explanation, but that the snowball attack is important is more than a bit mute. The first paragraph states "Police investigating a snowball attack on a Canvey cyclists". No they are not, or I hope not. I hope they investigating the assault and theft. It a totally misleading headline and a really poor standard of journalism. Do you agree?[/p][/quote]No I don't. The headline is there merely to give a brief idea of a story and all journalists are trained to "make the headline count," in other words to let the headline draw attention to a story. The headline is not intended to represent the story but to draw attention to it. Look through any newspaper and you will see this principle in action.[/p][/quote]Then surely the headlines should have been Police appeal after thugs assualt and steal from cyclist whataday

7:03pm Sat 2 Feb 13

John T Pharro says...

whataday wrote:
maddriver wrote:
John T Pharro wrote:
maddriver wrote:
John T Pharro wrote:
maddriver wrote:
emcee wrote:
The Echo really have no idea how to report the news, do they?
OK, so use the "snowballs" fact as part of the description of how the attack happened but to use it as a headline is purely amateurish.
It makes me wonder if they have school children somwhere trying to think up exciting headlines.
Good headlines sell papers. I wonder how well Echo sales are these days because I doubt it is the headlines that are selling the papers.
A comment that shows you have absolutely no idea of the workings of newspapers. No idea of journalistic procedures and nothing better to do than pick holes in something of which you know nothing.
So explain how the "workings of newspapers and journalistic procedures" apply here? The headline refers to a "snowball attack" as being the reason for the police appeal, not the far greater crimes of assault and theft,
Headlines are important to draw attention to a story. They must focus on a point which draws that attention.
The story here states quite clearly what happened and the headline has merely done it's job of highlighting a certain point which was relevant as snow was on the ground at the time.
The real point to be made here is that someone is taking the main point of the story away and trying to be clever.
Read any daily newspaper and you will see headlines of this nature. Perhaps you only read the Echo online because it's free.
Well thanks for the explanation, but that the snowball attack is important is more than a bit mute. The first paragraph states "Police investigating a snowball attack on a Canvey cyclists". No they are not, or I hope not. I hope they investigating the assault and theft.
It a totally misleading headline and a really poor standard of journalism. Do you agree?
No I don't. The headline is there merely to give a brief idea of a story and all journalists are trained to "make the headline count," in other words to let the headline draw attention to a story.
The headline is not intended to represent the story but to draw attention to it.
Look through any newspaper and you will see this principle in action.
Then surely the headlines should have been Police appeal after thugs assualt and steal from cyclist
Or if just to draw attention it might just as well read "Police seek Naked Woman with Rosé in mouth"
Nothing to do with story, but probably make you read.
[quote][p][bold]whataday[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]maddriver[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]John T Pharro[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]maddriver[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]John T Pharro[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]maddriver[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]emcee[/bold] wrote: The Echo really have no idea how to report the news, do they? OK, so use the "snowballs" fact as part of the description of how the attack happened but to use it as a headline is purely amateurish. It makes me wonder if they have school children somwhere trying to think up exciting headlines. Good headlines sell papers. I wonder how well Echo sales are these days because I doubt it is the headlines that are selling the papers.[/p][/quote]A comment that shows you have absolutely no idea of the workings of newspapers. No idea of journalistic procedures and nothing better to do than pick holes in something of which you know nothing.[/p][/quote]So explain how the "workings of newspapers and journalistic procedures" apply here? The headline refers to a "snowball attack" as being the reason for the police appeal, not the far greater crimes of assault and theft,[/p][/quote]Headlines are important to draw attention to a story. They must focus on a point which draws that attention. The story here states quite clearly what happened and the headline has merely done it's job of highlighting a certain point which was relevant as snow was on the ground at the time. The real point to be made here is that someone is taking the main point of the story away and trying to be clever. Read any daily newspaper and you will see headlines of this nature. Perhaps you only read the Echo online because it's free.[/p][/quote]Well thanks for the explanation, but that the snowball attack is important is more than a bit mute. The first paragraph states "Police investigating a snowball attack on a Canvey cyclists". No they are not, or I hope not. I hope they investigating the assault and theft. It a totally misleading headline and a really poor standard of journalism. Do you agree?[/p][/quote]No I don't. The headline is there merely to give a brief idea of a story and all journalists are trained to "make the headline count," in other words to let the headline draw attention to a story. The headline is not intended to represent the story but to draw attention to it. Look through any newspaper and you will see this principle in action.[/p][/quote]Then surely the headlines should have been Police appeal after thugs assualt and steal from cyclist[/p][/quote]Or if just to draw attention it might just as well read "Police seek Naked Woman with Rosé in mouth" Nothing to do with story, but probably make you read. John T Pharro

8:36pm Sat 2 Feb 13

Seasider90 says...

The headline should have read "Canvey Inmates bored with in breeding throw snowballs". Inmates from HMP Canvey were today being hunted. Lack of medication and not getting their bedtime story was thought to be the cause of their tantrum and taking out their frustration on a single person minding his own business. Once caught they will be given their medication and returned to the be atch house for the enjoyment of other Caravan dwellers,
The headline should have read "Canvey Inmates bored with in breeding throw snowballs". Inmates from HMP Canvey were today being hunted. Lack of medication and not getting their bedtime story was thought to be the cause of their tantrum and taking out their frustration on a single person minding his own business. Once caught they will be given their medication and returned to the be atch house for the enjoyment of other Caravan dwellers, Seasider90

10:40am Sun 3 Feb 13

supermadmax says...

emcee wrote:
The Echo really have no idea how to report the news, do they?
OK, so use the "snowballs" fact as part of the description of how the attack happened but to use it as a headline is purely amateurish.
It makes me wonder if they have school children somwhere trying to think up exciting headlines.
Good headlines sell papers. I wonder how well Echo sales are these days because I doubt it is the headlines that are selling the papers.
Well said, They also ban people who point this out so be careful.

Its a shambles of a paper & only survives due to lack of competition.
[quote][p][bold]emcee[/bold] wrote: The Echo really have no idea how to report the news, do they? OK, so use the "snowballs" fact as part of the description of how the attack happened but to use it as a headline is purely amateurish. It makes me wonder if they have school children somwhere trying to think up exciting headlines. Good headlines sell papers. I wonder how well Echo sales are these days because I doubt it is the headlines that are selling the papers.[/p][/quote]Well said, They also ban people who point this out so be careful. Its a shambles of a paper & only survives due to lack of competition. supermadmax

10:45pm Mon 4 Feb 13

InTheKnowOk says...

supermadmax wrote:
emcee wrote:
The Echo really have no idea how to report the news, do they?
OK, so use the "snowballs" fact as part of the description of how the attack happened but to use it as a headline is purely amateurish.
It makes me wonder if they have school children somwhere trying to think up exciting headlines.
Good headlines sell papers. I wonder how well Echo sales are these days because I doubt it is the headlines that are selling the papers.
Well said, They also ban people who point this out so be careful.

Its a shambles of a paper & only survives due to lack of competition.
Why read it then if you think it's a shambles of a paper?
[quote][p][bold]supermadmax[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]emcee[/bold] wrote: The Echo really have no idea how to report the news, do they? OK, so use the "snowballs" fact as part of the description of how the attack happened but to use it as a headline is purely amateurish. It makes me wonder if they have school children somwhere trying to think up exciting headlines. Good headlines sell papers. I wonder how well Echo sales are these days because I doubt it is the headlines that are selling the papers.[/p][/quote]Well said, They also ban people who point this out so be careful. Its a shambles of a paper & only survives due to lack of competition.[/p][/quote]Why read it then if you think it's a shambles of a paper? InTheKnowOk

12:58pm Tue 5 Feb 13

maxell says...

Ill help but will have to wait for more snow!
Ill help but will have to wait for more snow! maxell

10:31am Fri 8 Feb 13

Ivadda Goodhump says...

Shame it wasn't Shoebury Cyclist but one can't have everything!
Shame it wasn't Shoebury Cyclist but one can't have everything! Ivadda Goodhump

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