My elderly and sick dad was left on trolley at A&E

Echo: My elderly and sick dad was left on trolley at A&E My elderly and sick dad was left on trolley at A&E

A 78-YEAR-OLD man suffering from a fever was among elderly patients who waited hours in a draughty corridor to be seen by doctors at Southend Hospital.

Trolleys of sick, elderly patients were lined up waiting for at least three hours outside A&E before being admitted on Monday night.

Ambulance crews were forced to wait with patients, preventing them from attending any other emergencies.

Lianne Small, whose father Norman, 78, waited for two-and-a-half hours to be admitted, said: “It was like a third world country.

“It was all elderly people on trolleys waiting in draughty corridors.

“The ambulance crews said this is the beginning of winter and this is what’s going to happen.

“I don’t know how the hospital can gloss over what is going on.”

An ambulance rushed Mr Small, of Chalkwell Avenue, Chalkwell, to hospital with a temperature of 38C after his GP diagnosed a suspected chest infection.

Nurses took his blood pressure and temperature and he was admitted to the acute medical unit by about 11pm.

Ms Small, 54, whowas with her father, said about six or seven ambulance crews were waiting with patients in the corridor.

She said: “I’ve not seen anything like it. I couldn’t believe it.”

Chris Cole, medicine business unit director at the hospital, said: “Our accident and emergency department has been extremely busy over the past few days with a high number of acute attendances.

“We’re sorry to hear Ms Small is unhappy with the service her father received and would encourage her to contact us directly to enable us to investigate her concerns.”

A spokesman for the ambulance service said: “We have been working very closely with hospitals to reduce handover delays.

“The trust has introduced hospital ambulance liaison officers at some hospitals to improve the handover process between ambulance crews and hospital staff.”

Comments (13)

Please log in to enable comment sorting

8:55am Thu 12 Dec 13

clairebartlett says...

What exactly are the A&E staff supposed to do, if all the beds are full??? They can't just turf someone out because someone new comes through the door!

I think that this is an extremely unfair article against the hospital - We all already know that hospitals are being stretched to capacity and like the paramedic said, its winter, people get sick in winter. I dont think the hospital have "glossed over" this situation.

Also - why do people always go running to the paper without complaining to the hospital directly!! Seriously, bit of perspective required here!
What exactly are the A&E staff supposed to do, if all the beds are full??? They can't just turf someone out because someone new comes through the door! I think that this is an extremely unfair article against the hospital - We all already know that hospitals are being stretched to capacity and like the paramedic said, its winter, people get sick in winter. I dont think the hospital have "glossed over" this situation. Also - why do people always go running to the paper without complaining to the hospital directly!! Seriously, bit of perspective required here! clairebartlett

9:23am Thu 12 Dec 13

Kim Gandy says...

When I worked in a care home this happened to one of my residents. This was in Basildon hospital. I was managing the home overnight and only had five staff, the family refused to go with the lady so I had to send a member of staff leaving me with four people to look after 84.

I could not accompany the lady because I had 84 other elderly people to look after. I tried to reason with the hospital staff on the phone but to no avail. The member of staff with the lady did their best but the lady died later that day.

It is disgusting how hospitals treat old people. I have had numerous rows with medical staff over this and other related matters and even had to write to the health authority about one particular case where I was refused access to a practitioner who could come to the home to remove stitches to save the lady concerned the hassle of having to spend all morning in a hospital waiting room waiting to have them taken out.

I have accompanied elderly people to hospital and they are made to sit around in corridors. Some of them are incontinent so you have to ensure you are near a toilet with them and at the same time maintain their dignity.

This is NOT a good place to grow old in. It's time there were hospitals or at least hospital wings that deal entirely with geriatric care - and especially dementia which needs a higher level of security and more staff.

But that's the problem all around, penny pinching to save on staffing costs and while ever this continues these elderly people will suffer. It's unbearable to watch and damnably hard to deal with because arguing your elderly person's corner often falls on deaf ears too.
When I worked in a care home this happened to one of my residents. This was in Basildon hospital. I was managing the home overnight and only had five staff, the family refused to go with the lady so I had to send a member of staff leaving me with four people to look after 84. I could not accompany the lady because I had 84 other elderly people to look after. I tried to reason with the hospital staff on the phone but to no avail. The member of staff with the lady did their best but the lady died later that day. It is disgusting how hospitals treat old people. I have had numerous rows with medical staff over this and other related matters and even had to write to the health authority about one particular case where I was refused access to a practitioner who could come to the home to remove stitches to save the lady concerned the hassle of having to spend all morning in a hospital waiting room waiting to have them taken out. I have accompanied elderly people to hospital and they are made to sit around in corridors. Some of them are incontinent so you have to ensure you are near a toilet with them and at the same time maintain their dignity. This is NOT a good place to grow old in. It's time there were hospitals or at least hospital wings that deal entirely with geriatric care - and especially dementia which needs a higher level of security and more staff. But that's the problem all around, penny pinching to save on staffing costs and while ever this continues these elderly people will suffer. It's unbearable to watch and damnably hard to deal with because arguing your elderly person's corner often falls on deaf ears too. Kim Gandy

10:32am Thu 12 Dec 13

VoiceofFreedom says...

This article notes the patient “was admitted to the acute medical unit by about 11pm”, but it does not state the time of patient arrival at the hospital or what time he was seen. When the Echo prints “ was among elderly patients who waited hours in a draughty corridor”, this is unsubstantiated and vague. The reader cannot determine how long “hours” actually were.

The NHS is a large organisation. When people deal with people, with the best intentions in the world, mistakes are made, things are missed and people may not receive the best treatment - either medically or personally; people are only human after all; not perfect, autonomous androids, incapable of error.

I appreciate Ms Small's complaint; no one would choose for their relative to be treated with anything other than respect and appropriate care. But sometimes this fails. Hospital staff are often over-worked and despite their best work and best intentions, occasionally underwhelming care occurs. There are several factors in this story which result in the apparent perception of the hospital being indifferent to the patient’s needs. It is depressing Ms Small has evidentially chosen The Echo through which to complain, rather than directly through the hospital’s patient liaison service, causing the business unit director to issue a statement about this incident. Stories such as this tend to be rather one-sided and undermine the good work which at the hospital.

It is true during the winter months A&E experiences a higher turnover of patients, often many elderly, because of the weather. But people do need to appreciate A&E must prioritise admissions – of which can only be dealt with when and where there is space. This issue has not fallen upon deaf ears and the hospital is doing as much as it can to improve this within a tight budget.

For those wishing to besmirch the NHS, it’s worth noting its brief history, the beginnings and how lucky we are to have it:

"The NHS was launched on July 5 1948 by Aneurin Bevan, Labour health minister, at the Park Hospital in Manchester, which is now called Trafford General Hospital.

In a leaflet sent to every home, the government promised that the new NHS 'will provide you with all medical, dental and nursing care. Everyone - rich or poor, man, woman or child - can use it or any part of it. There are no charges, except for a few special items. There are no insurance qualifications. But it is not a "charity". You are all paying for it, mainly as taxpayers, and it will relieve your money worries in time of illness.'

Since 1948 healthcare has changed hugely, but the NHS's founding principles remain largely intact.

• People now live on average at least 10 years longer than they did in 1948.
• Then there were 16,864 GPs. Last year, 33,364.
• In 1948 there were 480,000 hospital beds. There are now 167,000.
• The NHS had a £248m annual budget. By 2007 it was £105.6bn.
• In 1948 women spent 14 days in hospital after giving birth. The average is now 1.7 days.
• In 1949 there were 5,000 consultants and 125,765 nurses and midwives. By 2007 there were 33,674 consultants and 376,767 nurses and midwives.
• In 1949 there were 492,000 on waiting lists. By 2007 the figure stood at 1,283,100.
• In 1952 prescription charges were a shilling (5p). They were abolished in 1965, reintroduced in 1968, and now cost £7.10.
• In 1958 a polio and diphtheria vaccinations programme was launched. Previously in epidemic years, diphtheria could cause up to 5,000 deaths. A dramatic reduction in both diseases followed.
• In 1961 the Pill was made available to married women, then to all women. By 1969 more than 1 million used it.
• In 1962 the first hip replacement was carried out. The oldest recipient has been a 101-year-old woman.
• In 1978 the world's first test tube baby was born. More than a million children have now been conceived this way.
• In the 1981 census it was revealed that 11 babies in every 1,000 die before the age of 1. In 1900 it was 160 in every 1,000.
• In 1988 a comprehensive breast and cervical screening programme was introduced for women. Since then 100,000 breast cancers and 400,000 cervical abnormalities have been detected, with 6,000 lives a year saved."

Taken from:
http://www.theguardi
an.com/society/2008/
jun/22/nhs60.nhs1
This article notes the patient “was admitted to the acute medical unit by about 11pm”, but it does not state the time of patient arrival at the hospital or what time he was seen. When the Echo prints “[he] was among elderly patients who waited hours in a draughty corridor”, this is unsubstantiated and vague. The reader cannot determine how long “hours” actually were. The NHS is a large organisation. When people deal with people, with the best intentions in the world, mistakes are made, things are missed and people may not receive the best treatment - either medically or personally; people are only human after all; not perfect, autonomous androids, incapable of error. I appreciate Ms Small's complaint; no one would choose for their relative to be treated with anything other than respect and appropriate care. But sometimes this fails. Hospital staff are often over-worked and despite their best work and best intentions, occasionally underwhelming care occurs. There are several factors in this story which result in the apparent perception of the hospital being indifferent to the patient’s needs. It is depressing Ms Small has evidentially chosen The Echo through which to complain, rather than directly through the hospital’s patient liaison service, causing the business unit director to issue a statement about this incident. Stories such as this tend to be rather one-sided and undermine the good work which at the hospital. It is true during the winter months A&E experiences a higher turnover of patients, often many elderly, because of the weather. But people do need to appreciate A&E must prioritise admissions – of which can only be dealt with when and where there is space. This issue has not fallen upon deaf ears and the hospital is doing as much as it can to improve this within a tight budget. For those wishing to besmirch the NHS, it’s worth noting its brief history, the beginnings and how lucky we are to have it: "The NHS was launched on July 5 1948 by Aneurin Bevan, Labour health minister, at the Park Hospital in Manchester, which is now called Trafford General Hospital. In a leaflet sent to every home, the government promised that the new NHS 'will provide you with all medical, dental and nursing care. Everyone - rich or poor, man, woman or child - can use it or any part of it. There are no charges, except for a few special items. There are no insurance qualifications. But it is not a "charity". You are all paying for it, mainly as taxpayers, and it will relieve your money worries in time of illness.' Since 1948 healthcare has changed hugely, but the NHS's founding principles remain largely intact. • People now live on average at least 10 years longer than they did in 1948. • Then there were 16,864 GPs. Last year, 33,364. • In 1948 there were 480,000 hospital beds. There are now 167,000. • The NHS had a £248m annual budget. By 2007 it was £105.6bn. • In 1948 women spent 14 days in hospital after giving birth. The average is now 1.7 days. • In 1949 there were 5,000 consultants and 125,765 nurses and midwives. By 2007 there were 33,674 consultants and 376,767 nurses and midwives. • In 1949 there were 492,000 on waiting lists. By 2007 the figure stood at 1,283,100. • In 1952 prescription charges were a shilling (5p). They were abolished in 1965, reintroduced in 1968, and now cost £7.10. • In 1958 a polio and diphtheria vaccinations programme was launched. Previously in epidemic years, diphtheria could cause up to 5,000 deaths. A dramatic reduction in both diseases followed. • In 1961 the Pill was made available to married women, then to all women. By 1969 more than 1 million used it. • In 1962 the first hip replacement was carried out. The oldest recipient has been a 101-year-old woman. • In 1978 the world's first test tube baby was born. More than a million children have now been conceived this way. • In the 1981 census it was revealed that 11 babies in every 1,000 die before the age of 1. In 1900 it was 160 in every 1,000. • In 1988 a comprehensive breast and cervical screening programme was introduced for women. Since then 100,000 breast cancers and 400,000 cervical abnormalities have been detected, with 6,000 lives a year saved." Taken from: http://www.theguardi an.com/society/2008/ jun/22/nhs60.nhs1 VoiceofFreedom

11:13am Thu 12 Dec 13

norfolkbroad says...

I sympathise with this gentleman's family but would urge them to complain to their MP as it is his government that is attempting to dismantle the NHS (exactly as the Conservative Party promised to do when the NHS was first launched all those years ago). It is not the fault of the hospital that they are underfunded but it IS the fault of an uncaring government who are privatising it indiscriminately and cutting vital funding under the guise of austerity. Our elderly parents would not have to wait in corridors if the millionaires who run the country decided to retrieve some of the tax they allow their pals to avoid paying...and we could all find many more examples of the unfair distribution of our money by Westminster.
I sympathise with this gentleman's family but would urge them to complain to their MP as it is his government that is attempting to dismantle the NHS (exactly as the Conservative Party promised to do when the NHS was first launched all those years ago). It is not the fault of the hospital that they are underfunded but it IS the fault of an uncaring government who are privatising it indiscriminately and cutting vital funding under the guise of austerity. Our elderly parents would not have to wait in corridors if the millionaires who run the country decided to retrieve some of the tax they allow their pals to avoid paying...and we could all find many more examples of the unfair distribution of our money by Westminster. norfolkbroad

11:16am Thu 12 Dec 13

fletch12107 says...

Complain all you like it will not shrink A&E queues or increase staff. The fact is when you turn up you are prioritised and seen accordingly. If that doesn't suit then go private.
Complain all you like it will not shrink A&E queues or increase staff. The fact is when you turn up you are prioritised and seen accordingly. If that doesn't suit then go private. fletch12107

12:36pm Thu 12 Dec 13

Nowthatsworthknowing says...

Unfortunately, if you arrive early, for an appointment, expect little else, think of it as a conveyer belt, each have to wait their turn.
Unfortunately, if you arrive early, for an appointment, expect little else, think of it as a conveyer belt, each have to wait their turn. Nowthatsworthknowing

2:54pm Thu 12 Dec 13

Walt Jabsco says...

Kim Gandy wrote:
When I worked in a care home this happened to one of my residents. This was in Basildon hospital. I was managing the home overnight and only had five staff, the family refused to go with the lady so I had to send a member of staff leaving me with four people to look after 84. I could not accompany the lady because I had 84 other elderly people to look after. I tried to reason with the hospital staff on the phone but to no avail. The member of staff with the lady did their best but the lady died later that day. It is disgusting how hospitals treat old people. I have had numerous rows with medical staff over this and other related matters and even had to write to the health authority about one particular case where I was refused access to a practitioner who could come to the home to remove stitches to save the lady concerned the hassle of having to spend all morning in a hospital waiting room waiting to have them taken out. I have accompanied elderly people to hospital and they are made to sit around in corridors. Some of them are incontinent so you have to ensure you are near a toilet with them and at the same time maintain their dignity. This is NOT a good place to grow old in. It's time there were hospitals or at least hospital wings that deal entirely with geriatric care - and especially dementia which needs a higher level of security and more staff. But that's the problem all around, penny pinching to save on staffing costs and while ever this continues these elderly people will suffer. It's unbearable to watch and damnably hard to deal with because arguing your elderly person's corner often falls on deaf ears too.
Not sure if you are the same Kim Gandy who once stood for the English Democrats but if you are still involved in politics, could you please explain how you would turn the NHS around as a whole, and also while you're about it please refrain from generalising that hospitals treat the elderly badly.....its the vast majority of staff within our exisiting hospitals that indeed work very hard to prevent ANY patient being treated badly.
[quote][p][bold]Kim Gandy[/bold] wrote: When I worked in a care home this happened to one of my residents. This was in Basildon hospital. I was managing the home overnight and only had five staff, the family refused to go with the lady so I had to send a member of staff leaving me with four people to look after 84. I could not accompany the lady because I had 84 other elderly people to look after. I tried to reason with the hospital staff on the phone but to no avail. The member of staff with the lady did their best but the lady died later that day. It is disgusting how hospitals treat old people. I have had numerous rows with medical staff over this and other related matters and even had to write to the health authority about one particular case where I was refused access to a practitioner who could come to the home to remove stitches to save the lady concerned the hassle of having to spend all morning in a hospital waiting room waiting to have them taken out. I have accompanied elderly people to hospital and they are made to sit around in corridors. Some of them are incontinent so you have to ensure you are near a toilet with them and at the same time maintain their dignity. This is NOT a good place to grow old in. It's time there were hospitals or at least hospital wings that deal entirely with geriatric care - and especially dementia which needs a higher level of security and more staff. But that's the problem all around, penny pinching to save on staffing costs and while ever this continues these elderly people will suffer. It's unbearable to watch and damnably hard to deal with because arguing your elderly person's corner often falls on deaf ears too.[/p][/quote]Not sure if you are the same Kim Gandy who once stood for the English Democrats but if you are still involved in politics, could you please explain how you would turn the NHS around as a whole, and also while you're about it please refrain from generalising that hospitals treat the elderly badly.....its the vast majority of staff within our exisiting hospitals that indeed work very hard to prevent ANY patient being treated badly. Walt Jabsco

3:09pm Thu 12 Dec 13

Nowthatsworthknowing says...

Walt Jabsco wrote:
Kim Gandy wrote:
When I worked in a care home this happened to one of my residents. This was in Basildon hospital. I was managing the home overnight and only had five staff, the family refused to go with the lady so I had to send a member of staff leaving me with four people to look after 84. I could not accompany the lady because I had 84 other elderly people to look after. I tried to reason with the hospital staff on the phone but to no avail. The member of staff with the lady did their best but the lady died later that day. It is disgusting how hospitals treat old people. I have had numerous rows with medical staff over this and other related matters and even had to write to the health authority about one particular case where I was refused access to a practitioner who could come to the home to remove stitches to save the lady concerned the hassle of having to spend all morning in a hospital waiting room waiting to have them taken out. I have accompanied elderly people to hospital and they are made to sit around in corridors. Some of them are incontinent so you have to ensure you are near a toilet with them and at the same time maintain their dignity. This is NOT a good place to grow old in. It's time there were hospitals or at least hospital wings that deal entirely with geriatric care - and especially dementia which needs a higher level of security and more staff. But that's the problem all around, penny pinching to save on staffing costs and while ever this continues these elderly people will suffer. It's unbearable to watch and damnably hard to deal with because arguing your elderly person's corner often falls on deaf ears too.
Not sure if you are the same Kim Gandy who once stood for the English Democrats but if you are still involved in politics, could you please explain how you would turn the NHS around as a whole, and also while you're about it please refrain from generalising that hospitals treat the elderly badly.....its the vast majority of staff within our exisiting hospitals that indeed work very hard to prevent ANY patient being treated badly.
You will have to excuse Gandy, for her staunch right wing views, though imagine how worse things will seem, when she herself has to go into hospital...
[quote][p][bold]Walt Jabsco[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Kim Gandy[/bold] wrote: When I worked in a care home this happened to one of my residents. This was in Basildon hospital. I was managing the home overnight and only had five staff, the family refused to go with the lady so I had to send a member of staff leaving me with four people to look after 84. I could not accompany the lady because I had 84 other elderly people to look after. I tried to reason with the hospital staff on the phone but to no avail. The member of staff with the lady did their best but the lady died later that day. It is disgusting how hospitals treat old people. I have had numerous rows with medical staff over this and other related matters and even had to write to the health authority about one particular case where I was refused access to a practitioner who could come to the home to remove stitches to save the lady concerned the hassle of having to spend all morning in a hospital waiting room waiting to have them taken out. I have accompanied elderly people to hospital and they are made to sit around in corridors. Some of them are incontinent so you have to ensure you are near a toilet with them and at the same time maintain their dignity. This is NOT a good place to grow old in. It's time there were hospitals or at least hospital wings that deal entirely with geriatric care - and especially dementia which needs a higher level of security and more staff. But that's the problem all around, penny pinching to save on staffing costs and while ever this continues these elderly people will suffer. It's unbearable to watch and damnably hard to deal with because arguing your elderly person's corner often falls on deaf ears too.[/p][/quote]Not sure if you are the same Kim Gandy who once stood for the English Democrats but if you are still involved in politics, could you please explain how you would turn the NHS around as a whole, and also while you're about it please refrain from generalising that hospitals treat the elderly badly.....its the vast majority of staff within our exisiting hospitals that indeed work very hard to prevent ANY patient being treated badly.[/p][/quote]You will have to excuse Gandy, for her staunch right wing views, though imagine how worse things will seem, when she herself has to go into hospital... Nowthatsworthknowing

3:34pm Thu 12 Dec 13

jolllyboy says...

I get annoyed when people write how wonderful the things that are done at Southend General - the point is that they close wards and still wonder why there are not enough beds. Take the Bone Ward now to close weekends. Weekends are busy times and those beds could be used. Why are waiting lists not cut by using that ward for operations. With GPs closing weekends, less consultants but the population has increased over the years so you obviously need more beds not less. Knock down the car park, extend the hospital, compulsory buy a few of the local bungalows and build a large multi-storey car park. Time to make our local hospital a place of excellence not take our eye off the ball. If the hospital goes into the red to pay for staff then do it ! People cannot work if they need treatment.
I get annoyed when people write how wonderful the things that are done at Southend General - the point is that they close wards and still wonder why there are not enough beds. Take the Bone Ward now to close weekends. Weekends are busy times and those beds could be used. Why are waiting lists not cut by using that ward for operations. With GPs closing weekends, less consultants but the population has increased over the years so you obviously need more beds not less. Knock down the car park, extend the hospital, compulsory buy a few of the local bungalows and build a large multi-storey car park. Time to make our local hospital a place of excellence not take our eye off the ball. If the hospital goes into the red to pay for staff then do it ! People cannot work if they need treatment. jolllyboy

4:25pm Thu 12 Dec 13

Idontknowy says...

fletch12107 wrote:
Complain all you like it will not shrink A&E queues or increase staff. The fact is when you turn up you are prioritised and seen accordingly. If that doesn't suit then go private.
How can you go private when as an elderly person you can no longer go to work to fund private medicine. Elderly people have paid through N,I. graduated pensions and Income tax towards NHS care. As somebody pointed out above the NHS was created to provide free medical care to everybody in England The elderly have paid for it throughout their working lives and are entitled to it. Its the conservatives who are dismantling it and as we all know they are only concerned about the rich and the old boys brigade
[quote][p][bold]fletch12107[/bold] wrote: Complain all you like it will not shrink A&E queues or increase staff. The fact is when you turn up you are prioritised and seen accordingly. If that doesn't suit then go private.[/p][/quote]How can you go private when as an elderly person you can no longer go to work to fund private medicine. Elderly people have paid through N,I. graduated pensions and Income tax towards NHS care. As somebody pointed out above the NHS was created to provide free medical care to everybody in England The elderly have paid for it throughout their working lives and are entitled to it. Its the conservatives who are dismantling it and as we all know they are only concerned about the rich and the old boys brigade Idontknowy

4:30pm Thu 12 Dec 13

Idontknowy says...

Imagine the field day people would be having if this story was about Basildon Hospital. I cannot understand why Southend Hospital has escaped the bad press and inspections that Basildon Hospital has been subjected to.
However in support of ALL NHS Hospitals I would say its about time the people of England did something about this government which is intent on dismantling the NHS by continually cutting budgets and placing unobtainable targets on them (unobtainable because they have necessitated the cuts in staff and beds available for patients)
Imagine the field day people would be having if this story was about Basildon Hospital. I cannot understand why Southend Hospital has escaped the bad press and inspections that Basildon Hospital has been subjected to. However in support of ALL NHS Hospitals I would say its about time the people of England did something about this government which is intent on dismantling the NHS by continually cutting budgets and placing unobtainable targets on them (unobtainable because they have necessitated the cuts in staff and beds available for patients) Idontknowy

7:34pm Thu 12 Dec 13

Nowthatsworthknowing says...

fletch12107 wrote:
Complain all you like it will not shrink A&E queues or increase staff. The fact is when you turn up you are prioritised and seen accordingly. If that doesn't suit then go private.
A bit like nursing homes, if you've enjoyed the wealth of elderly parents, don't expect the council to subsidise the care for the elderly, spend some of it on private nursing home costs, G'day.....
[quote][p][bold]fletch12107[/bold] wrote: Complain all you like it will not shrink A&E queues or increase staff. The fact is when you turn up you are prioritised and seen accordingly. If that doesn't suit then go private.[/p][/quote]A bit like nursing homes, if you've enjoyed the wealth of elderly parents, don't expect the council to subsidise the care for the elderly, spend some of it on private nursing home costs, G'day..... Nowthatsworthknowing

10:55pm Thu 12 Dec 13

Steve H says...

He had a fever.

Whilst I appreciate this can be serious, it is not as serious as say, stroke or cardiac arrest, who's to say this wasn't the case.

Why mention Southend Hospital, I can tell you now it is common place in hospitals all over the county and country.
He had a fever. Whilst I appreciate this can be serious, it is not as serious as say, stroke or cardiac arrest, who's to say this wasn't the case. Why mention Southend Hospital, I can tell you now it is common place in hospitals all over the county and country. Steve H

Comments are closed on this article.

click2find

About cookies

We want you to enjoy your visit to our website. That's why we use cookies to enhance your experience. By staying on our website you agree to our use of cookies. Find out more about the cookies we use.

I agree