Basildon Hospital death rates "back to normal"

Basildon Hospital death rates

Basildon Hospital death rates "back to normal"

First published in Local News

DEATH rates at Basildon Hospital have dropped to “normal” levels for the first time.

More staff, more beds and a new policy to ensure sufficient staffing at weekends and on bank holidays have led to a reduction in mortality rates.

Shockingly high numbers of deaths were one of the reasons the hospital was put in special measures.

However, hospital chief executive Clare Panniker believes the hospital has now turned a corner.

She said: “This is a crucial indicator to show all we have done is working.

“It’s really reassuring for the public, and we think it will improve further.”

Both mortality indicators, used nationally to compare hospitals, prove the hospital has improved its death rates.

The good news comes just days before the Care Quality Commission is due to inspect the hospital again to consider taking it out of special measures.

Ms Panniker is confident things are about to change. She added: “We were put in special measures due to our paediatrics, mortality rates, governance, A&E and 18- week waiting times.

“We are not worried about any of those now.

“We have increased staffing, beds, and are reducing cardiac arrests, and that’s all helped.

“We have a focus on seven-day working, with more staff in at a weekend.

“All patients are seen within 12 hours in A&E. All those things are measures that can point to a reduction of deaths.”

Comments (7)

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3:49pm Mon 17 Mar 14

jolllyboy says...

The aim of a hospital is to have LESS than normal deaths !
The aim of a hospital is to have LESS than normal deaths ! jolllyboy
  • Score: 10

4:40pm Mon 17 Mar 14

Devils Advocate says...

Surely, improvements in death rates is a kind of double de-clanger? Shouldn't it be something like improvements in survival rates?
Surely, improvements in death rates is a kind of double de-clanger? Shouldn't it be something like improvements in survival rates? Devils Advocate
  • Score: 7

4:47pm Mon 17 Mar 14

Bangemup says...

What a dreadful state of affairs , with so many managers and admin staff one wonders how this situation could possibly occur . Who was guilty of not doing what they were paid very well to do ? As for patients seen within 12 hours of entering A & E is that a joke ? !2 hours is half a day ,I'm surprised people have not starved to death waiting to be treated . Britain is becoming WORSE than a third World Country . Time for a wake up call .The National Health is one of the biggest employers in Britain and the World ,standards needs to improve vastly , cut out the highly paid managers and replace them with more Matrons who were the backbone of healthcare until Politics took over . Your life is at stake !
What a dreadful state of affairs , with so many managers and admin staff one wonders how this situation could possibly occur . Who was guilty of not doing what they were paid very well to do ? As for patients seen within 12 hours of entering A & E is that a joke ? !2 hours is half a day ,I'm surprised people have not starved to death waiting to be treated . Britain is becoming WORSE than a third World Country . Time for a wake up call .The National Health is one of the biggest employers in Britain and the World ,standards needs to improve vastly , cut out the highly paid managers and replace them with more Matrons who were the backbone of healthcare until Politics took over . Your life is at stake ! Bangemup
  • Score: 8

5:45pm Mon 17 Mar 14

carnmountyouknowitmakessense says...

Had someone died during the time of the unacceptably high death period, might it be suggested, that they died without their best possible care, being offered to them ? If the answer is yes, then surely the term negligence comes into play...
Had someone died during the time of the unacceptably high death period, might it be suggested, that they died without their best possible care, being offered to them ? If the answer is yes, then surely the term negligence comes into play... carnmountyouknowitmakessense
  • Score: 5

6:45pm Mon 17 Mar 14

runwellian says...

Shouldn't the 12 hours in A&E actually be four hours, an agreed national standard or have the Echo got it s figure mixed up?

As much as Basildon has been criticised, at least they don't have high numbers of 'NEVER' events or patients falling out of windows like another hospital not too far away beside the seaside?
Shouldn't the 12 hours in A&E actually be four hours, an agreed national standard or have the Echo got it s figure mixed up? As much as Basildon has been criticised, at least they don't have high numbers of 'NEVER' events or patients falling out of windows like another hospital not too far away beside the seaside? runwellian
  • Score: 5

7:33pm Mon 17 Mar 14

benfleet101 says...

This is all a bit of mis-information fed to us via the Dr Foster data gathering firm that is employed by the NHS so they can use league tables to compare hospitals The trouble is there are too many variables area to area to make the statistics used give an accurate picture. One glaring example was in Liverpool where a hospital was slated for a much higher death rate than 'normal'. the press has a field day, patients refused to be seen there and the hospital suffered. It transpired, unlike other hospitals used in gathering the statistics, it did not have use of a local Hospice and nursed it's own terminal patients. The Dr Foster program did not have the capacity to take this into account. When a Hospice opened in the area, the death rate at the hospital dropped dramatically... but then any sensible person would have expected that!
This is all a bit of mis-information fed to us via the Dr Foster data gathering firm that is employed by the NHS so they can use league tables to compare hospitals The trouble is there are too many variables area to area to make the statistics used give an accurate picture. One glaring example was in Liverpool where a hospital was slated for a much higher death rate than 'normal'. the press has a field day, patients refused to be seen there and the hospital suffered. It transpired, unlike other hospitals used in gathering the statistics, it did not have use of a local Hospice and nursed it's own terminal patients. The Dr Foster program did not have the capacity to take this into account. When a Hospice opened in the area, the death rate at the hospital dropped dramatically... but then any sensible person would have expected that! benfleet101
  • Score: 4

8:47am Tue 18 Mar 14

railfan235 says...

thats a understatement basildon is the biggest bucher shop in the whole county
thats a understatement basildon is the biggest bucher shop in the whole county railfan235
  • Score: 1

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