Havens appeals for volunteers to join therapy team

Volunteer therapists wanted - complementary therapy and wellbeing coordinator Lucie Cole with patient Stephen Hughes and his wife, Irene

Volunteer therapists wanted - complementary therapy and wellbeing coordinator Lucie Cole with patient Stephen Hughes and his wife, Irene

First published in Local News

A VITAL service which helps patients and carers cope with serious illness is expanding – and needs more people to join its dedicated band of volunteers.

Havens Hospices offers free reflexology, aromatherapy and massage as part of its care for patients.

The charity is looking for volunteers to join its complementary therapy team. Complementary therapies are used alongside medical treatment and medicine to help ease the side effects such as nausea, constipation and fatigue, to ease headaches.

Lucie Cole, complementary therapy and wellbeing co-ordinator at Havens Hospices, said: “Complementary therapy gives patients a feeling of wellbeing. We identify the individual’s needs and we then provide support alongside their medical treatment and medication.”

Complementary therapies are offered to patients in the Westcliffbased Fair Havens hospice and also to younger people at Little Havens Children’s Hospice, in Thundersley, their families and carers.

Ms Cole added: “I split my time between Fair Havens and Little Havens. I hold coffee mornings and complementary therapy evenings over at Little Havens, as well as evenings at Fair Havens. It’s nice for the children, as well as their parents, carers and siblings to get special treatment.”

Stephen Hughes, 61, from Southend, was diagnosed with lung cancer in 2011,.

He’d had asthma for years and as his condition worsened it progressed into chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Cancer has also spread to his liver and he has recently started another round of chemotherapy.

He said: “There are a lot of activities I can’t do any more, because of my breathing, but I still work at the hospital, which givesme a bit of normality.

“I’ve had a bad back before and used to have massages at the hospital, but when I was diagnosed with cancer, they weren’t sure whether they could carry on.

“I go to day care at Fair Havens and one of the nurses mentioned I could have a massage, and so could my wife, Irene. I absolutely love it for relaxation and I feel better for a few days afterwards.”

Volunteers need to be qualified in either beauty therapy or individual treatments, such as reflexology, massage or aromatherapy, and be friendly and flexible.

For details, contact the Havens’ volunteer services office, on 01702 426237, or visit havenshospices .org.uk/volunteering

Comments (3)

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4:46pm Mon 11 Aug 14

Life in a seaside town says...

Well done Lucie and her team particularly as it is voluntary. Again well done
Well done Lucie and her team particularly as it is voluntary. Again well done Life in a seaside town
  • Score: 1

4:55pm Mon 11 Aug 14

Jack222 says...

Complementary therapy - really alternative medicine - is rubbish. All medicine should have a science evidence base. Alternative medicine does not have this. Just ask why alternative medicine does not exist in accident and emergency wards - the answer is because it doesn't work.

A massage is not the same thing - it has an evidence based support. But 'holistic', reflexology and aromatherapy does not have any evidence based support of which I am aware.

Just because the alternative medicine people occasionally have some bits in with evidence based medicine can support does not mean the rest of the ' not scientifically supported medicine' is valid.

You may feel special because someone has come along and said nice things around you - but that's because you have got some attention, not because of the pointless alternative medicine / alternative therapy being offered.
Complementary therapy - really alternative medicine - is rubbish. All medicine should have a science evidence base. Alternative medicine does not have this. Just ask why alternative medicine does not exist in accident and emergency wards - the answer is because it doesn't work. A massage is not the same thing - it has an evidence based support. But 'holistic', reflexology and aromatherapy does not have any evidence based support of which I am aware. Just because the alternative medicine people occasionally have some bits in with evidence based medicine can support does not mean the rest of the ' not scientifically supported medicine' is valid. You may feel special because someone has come along and said nice things around you - but that's because you have got some attention, not because of the pointless alternative medicine / alternative therapy being offered. Jack222
  • Score: -2

7:11pm Mon 11 Aug 14

Royr says...

Jack222 wrote:
Complementary therapy - really alternative medicine - is rubbish. All medicine should have a science evidence base. Alternative medicine does not have this. Just ask why alternative medicine does not exist in accident and emergency wards - the answer is because it doesn't work.

A massage is not the same thing - it has an evidence based support. But 'holistic', reflexology and aromatherapy does not have any evidence based support of which I am aware.

Just because the alternative medicine people occasionally have some bits in with evidence based medicine can support does not mean the rest of the ' not scientifically supported medicine' is valid.

You may feel special because someone has come along and said nice things around you - but that's because you have got some attention, not because of the pointless alternative medicine / alternative therapy being offered.
Bit of a mixed message from you here.
It is a proven fact that placebos can have a positive effect. This is most likely because the patient feels cared for (which doctors had time to do back in the dark days of my youth!) The same goes for massage.
And I don't know about you, but the smell of bacon frying makes me feel better (and hungry!)

I do agree that a lot of 'alternative' is rubbish (homeopathy for goodness sake)

However, if these volunteers make the patients (and themselves) feel better, then I can only stand back in admiration.
[quote][p][bold]Jack222[/bold] wrote: Complementary therapy - really alternative medicine - is rubbish. All medicine should have a science evidence base. Alternative medicine does not have this. Just ask why alternative medicine does not exist in accident and emergency wards - the answer is because it doesn't work. A massage is not the same thing - it has an evidence based support. But 'holistic', reflexology and aromatherapy does not have any evidence based support of which I am aware. Just because the alternative medicine people occasionally have some bits in with evidence based medicine can support does not mean the rest of the ' not scientifically supported medicine' is valid. You may feel special because someone has come along and said nice things around you - but that's because you have got some attention, not because of the pointless alternative medicine / alternative therapy being offered.[/p][/quote]Bit of a mixed message from you here. It is a proven fact that placebos can have a positive effect. This is most likely because the patient feels cared for (which doctors had time to do back in the dark days of my youth!) The same goes for massage. And I don't know about you, but the smell of bacon frying makes me feel better (and hungry!) I do agree that a lot of 'alternative' is rubbish (homeopathy for goodness sake) However, if these volunteers make the patients (and themselves) feel better, then I can only stand back in admiration. Royr
  • Score: 3

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