Southend to become hyper-acute stroke unit for Essex

SOUTHEND could become a major hub providing specialist treatment for stroke patients under new proposals.

The town’s hospital, already with a first class stroke unit, is recommended as one of three future hyper-acute stroke units for Essex.

The others would be Colchester and Chelmsford. All five hospitals in Essex including Basildon would continue to have an acute stroke unit but would effectively be downgraded.

Hyper-acute stroke units in the three hospitals would give all patients in Essex immediate access to top stroke specialists 24 hours a day, 7 days a week.

The hyper-acute units would provide critical care for patients in the first three crucial days of having a stroke.

After that, patients would return to their nearest stroke unit, if they needed further specialist care, or they would return home with a full rehabilitation programme.

Southend is already providing this enhanced service and has received widespread and national recognition.

Its stroke unit was been named the best in the East of England and the Midlands last year for its swift and effective treatment of patients in danger of having a potentially fatal stroke.

The figures, released by the Royal College of Physicians and the Vascular Society, named Southend as one of the best for carrying out operations to clear patients’ carotid arteries to ensure their condition does not deteriorate.

It also acheived an 88 per cent success rate of carrying out the surgery within 14 days of the patient first experiencing symptoms. The national average was just 48 per cent.

Jacqueline Totterdell, Southend Hospital chief executive said: “We are delighted that our award winning stroke service has been recognised as a preferred option to become a hyper acute stroke service as part of the on-going review into the provision of stroke services across Essex and the East of England.

“We will work with our colleagues in the clinical commissioning groups and patient and carers across the local area over the coming months to ensure that our excellent service meets their needs and continues to deliver high quality critical care when it is needed the most.”

Clare Panniker, Chief Executive of Basildon and Thurrock University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, said: “While we are disappointed in this initial proposal, we recognise further work is required to determine the final recommendations of where hyper acute units will be located. This will require public consultation.

"We will continue to provide a hyper acute service at Basildon during this time, and will work closely will commissioners to ensure that any changes in arrangement will not disadvantage Basildon patients.”

Clinical Commissioning Groups (CCGs), set to lead the NHS from April 1, are considering their recommendations to enhance stroke services in the county which the Midlands and East Strategic Health Authority cluster board will consider in March.

The public would be consulted on the plans later in the year.

Pam Green, Lead Commissioner for stroke services on behalf of the seven Essex CCGs, said: “We still have some work to do before we know exactly how the proposed enhancements would work best. We are looking at all stroke services from a prevention approach right through to rehabilitation and recovery at home or in the community.

“Listening to the views of patients and carers is enormously important in order to get this right.”

Dr Tony Rudd, Professor of Stroke Medicine at Guy's and St Thomas' NHS Foundation Trust, led a detailed review of the potential options for Essex.

He said: “After a thorough analysis of all the options, the panel came to the view that three hyper-acute stroke units was the right balance for Essex between accessibility for patients and the available specialist clinical expertise.”

If agreed public consultation would take place between May and the autumn with it to come into force by the end of 2015.

Comments (4)

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9:53am Sat 23 Feb 13

Shoebury_Cyclist says...

It doesn't matter if Southend hospital specialises in anything, because on April 1st the tories will 100% privatise the NHS:

quote - The regulations force health commissioners to open up virtually all services to competition, either through competitive tendering or using the Any Qualified Provider market. The AQP market operates as the ‘Choose and Book’ system which provides patients with a shopping list of services to chose their treatment from.

From the 1st April commissioners will be required to advertise new contracts, then judge the bids received based on published criteria. The new regulations effectively close down the possibility of awarding a contract without competition, saying that this can only occur in very exceptional circumstances (namely emergency situations or when no other provider is capable of providing the same services) . They also pull arrangements between NHS bodies into the new competition regime. This appears totally contrary to former health secretary Andrew Lansley’s assurances to Clinical Commissioning Groups this time last year .

The new regulations grant Monitor sweeping statutory powers as a regulator to intervene and enforce competition . Monitor will be able to decide when commissioners have breached competition regulations, and have the authority to set aside contracts, stop arrangements that they deem flawed and to impose competitive tendering and the offer of Any Qualified Provider. During the Bill’s passage, Monitor’s role as regulator changed from one of ‘promoting competition’ to instead ‘preventing anti-competitive behaviour’, but as some suspected, this is a distinction without a difference .

Far from giving GPs flexible powers to choose the right provision for patients, these regulations force competitive markets across the board, barring only very exceptional circumstances. They bring an inherent assumption that a greater choice of providers is better for patients.

Implementing commercial competition throughout the NHS creates rights for independent providers to compete for any NHS funding that is spent on purchasing services for patients. Such a regime benefits private providers and reorientates the whole system towards the focus on penny-pinching that has just proved fatal to so many at Stafford Hospital . ‘Provider rights’ lock the privatisation of services into place because renationalisation would trigger compensation claims due under competition law, making it extremely expensive and politically difficult for a government to turn back - end quote

Read more here:

http://www.opendemoc

racy.net/ournhs/nico

la-cutcher-lucy-reyn

olds/nhs-as-we-know-

it-needs-prayer

There is still time to prevent this. Write to your MP, or sign the petition. Or do both.

Sign the petition here:

http://you.38degrees

.org.uk/petitions/pe

tition-to-stop-new-n

hs-competition-regul

ations-si257-being-p

assed

Write to your MP here:

http://www.writetoth

em.com
It doesn't matter if Southend hospital specialises in anything, because on April 1st the tories will 100% privatise the NHS: quote - The regulations force health commissioners to open up virtually all services to competition, either through competitive tendering or using the Any Qualified Provider market. The AQP market operates as the ‘Choose and Book’ system which provides patients with a shopping list of services to chose their treatment from. From the 1st April commissioners will be required to advertise new contracts, then judge the bids received based on published criteria. The new regulations effectively close down the possibility of awarding a contract without competition, saying that this can only occur in very exceptional circumstances (namely emergency situations or when no other provider is capable of providing the same services) . They also pull arrangements between NHS bodies into the new competition regime. This appears totally contrary to former health secretary Andrew Lansley’s assurances to Clinical Commissioning Groups this time last year . The new regulations grant Monitor sweeping statutory powers as a regulator to intervene and enforce competition . Monitor will be able to decide when commissioners have breached competition regulations, and have the authority to set aside contracts, stop arrangements that they deem flawed and to impose competitive tendering and the offer of Any Qualified Provider. During the Bill’s passage, Monitor’s role as regulator changed from one of ‘promoting competition’ to instead ‘preventing anti-competitive behaviour’, but as some suspected, this is a distinction without a difference . Far from giving GPs flexible powers to choose the right provision for patients, these regulations force competitive markets across the board, barring only very exceptional circumstances. They bring an inherent assumption that a greater choice of providers is better for patients. Implementing commercial competition throughout the NHS creates rights for independent providers to compete for any NHS funding that is spent on purchasing services for patients. Such a regime benefits private providers and reorientates the whole system towards the focus on penny-pinching that has just proved fatal to so many at Stafford Hospital . ‘Provider rights’ lock the privatisation of services into place because renationalisation would trigger compensation claims due under competition law, making it extremely expensive and politically difficult for a government to turn back - end quote Read more here: http://www.opendemoc racy.net/ournhs/nico la-cutcher-lucy-reyn olds/nhs-as-we-know- it-needs-prayer There is still time to prevent this. Write to your MP, or sign the petition. Or do both. Sign the petition here: http://you.38degrees .org.uk/petitions/pe tition-to-stop-new-n hs-competition-regul ations-si257-being-p assed Write to your MP here: http://www.writetoth em.com Shoebury_Cyclist

9:56am Sat 23 Feb 13

WhateverS says...

Shoebury_Cyclist wrote:
It doesn't matter if Southend hospital specialises in anything, because on April 1st the tories will 100% privatise the NHS:

quote - The regulations force health commissioners to open up virtually all services to competition, either through competitive tendering or using the Any Qualified Provider market. The AQP market operates as the ‘Choose and Book’ system which provides patients with a shopping list of services to chose their treatment from.

From the 1st April commissioners will be required to advertise new contracts, then judge the bids received based on published criteria. The new regulations effectively close down the possibility of awarding a contract without competition, saying that this can only occur in very exceptional circumstances (namely emergency situations or when no other provider is capable of providing the same services) . They also pull arrangements between NHS bodies into the new competition regime. This appears totally contrary to former health secretary Andrew Lansley’s assurances to Clinical Commissioning Groups this time last year .

The new regulations grant Monitor sweeping statutory powers as a regulator to intervene and enforce competition . Monitor will be able to decide when commissioners have breached competition regulations, and have the authority to set aside contracts, stop arrangements that they deem flawed and to impose competitive tendering and the offer of Any Qualified Provider. During the Bill’s passage, Monitor’s role as regulator changed from one of ‘promoting competition’ to instead ‘preventing anti-competitive behaviour’, but as some suspected, this is a distinction without a difference .

Far from giving GPs flexible powers to choose the right provision for patients, these regulations force competitive markets across the board, barring only very exceptional circumstances. They bring an inherent assumption that a greater choice of providers is better for patients.

Implementing commercial competition throughout the NHS creates rights for independent providers to compete for any NHS funding that is spent on purchasing services for patients. Such a regime benefits private providers and reorientates the whole system towards the focus on penny-pinching that has just proved fatal to so many at Stafford Hospital . ‘Provider rights’ lock the privatisation of services into place because renationalisation would trigger compensation claims due under competition law, making it extremely expensive and politically difficult for a government to turn back - end quote

Read more here:

http://www.opendemoc


racy.net/ournhs/nico


la-cutcher-lucy-reyn


olds/nhs-as-we-know-


it-needs-prayer

There is still time to prevent this. Write to your MP, or sign the petition. Or do both.

Sign the petition here:

http://you.38degrees


.org.uk/petitions/pe


tition-to-stop-new-n


hs-competition-regul


ations-si257-being-p


assed

Write to your MP here:

http://www.writetoth


em.com
Never anything good to say about anything
[quote][p][bold]Shoebury_Cyclist[/bold] wrote: It doesn't matter if Southend hospital specialises in anything, because on April 1st the tories will 100% privatise the NHS: quote - The regulations force health commissioners to open up virtually all services to competition, either through competitive tendering or using the Any Qualified Provider market. The AQP market operates as the ‘Choose and Book’ system which provides patients with a shopping list of services to chose their treatment from. From the 1st April commissioners will be required to advertise new contracts, then judge the bids received based on published criteria. The new regulations effectively close down the possibility of awarding a contract without competition, saying that this can only occur in very exceptional circumstances (namely emergency situations or when no other provider is capable of providing the same services) . They also pull arrangements between NHS bodies into the new competition regime. This appears totally contrary to former health secretary Andrew Lansley’s assurances to Clinical Commissioning Groups this time last year . The new regulations grant Monitor sweeping statutory powers as a regulator to intervene and enforce competition . Monitor will be able to decide when commissioners have breached competition regulations, and have the authority to set aside contracts, stop arrangements that they deem flawed and to impose competitive tendering and the offer of Any Qualified Provider. During the Bill’s passage, Monitor’s role as regulator changed from one of ‘promoting competition’ to instead ‘preventing anti-competitive behaviour’, but as some suspected, this is a distinction without a difference . Far from giving GPs flexible powers to choose the right provision for patients, these regulations force competitive markets across the board, barring only very exceptional circumstances. They bring an inherent assumption that a greater choice of providers is better for patients. Implementing commercial competition throughout the NHS creates rights for independent providers to compete for any NHS funding that is spent on purchasing services for patients. Such a regime benefits private providers and reorientates the whole system towards the focus on penny-pinching that has just proved fatal to so many at Stafford Hospital . ‘Provider rights’ lock the privatisation of services into place because renationalisation would trigger compensation claims due under competition law, making it extremely expensive and politically difficult for a government to turn back - end quote Read more here: http://www.opendemoc racy.net/ournhs/nico la-cutcher-lucy-reyn olds/nhs-as-we-know- it-needs-prayer There is still time to prevent this. Write to your MP, or sign the petition. Or do both. Sign the petition here: http://you.38degrees .org.uk/petitions/pe tition-to-stop-new-n hs-competition-regul ations-si257-being-p assed Write to your MP here: http://www.writetoth em.com[/p][/quote]Never anything good to say about anything WhateverS

7:41pm Sat 23 Feb 13

Joe Wildman-Clark says...

Shoebury_Cyclist wrote:
It doesn't matter if Southend hospital specialises in anything, because on April 1st the tories will 100% privatise the NHS:

quote - The regulations force health commissioners to open up virtually all services to competition, either through competitive tendering or using the Any Qualified Provider market. The AQP market operates as the ‘Choose and Book’ system which provides patients with a shopping list of services to chose their treatment from.

From the 1st April commissioners will be required to advertise new contracts, then judge the bids received based on published criteria. The new regulations effectively close down the possibility of awarding a contract without competition, saying that this can only occur in very exceptional circumstances (namely emergency situations or when no other provider is capable of providing the same services) . They also pull arrangements between NHS bodies into the new competition regime. This appears totally contrary to former health secretary Andrew Lansley’s assurances to Clinical Commissioning Groups this time last year .

The new regulations grant Monitor sweeping statutory powers as a regulator to intervene and enforce competition . Monitor will be able to decide when commissioners have breached competition regulations, and have the authority to set aside contracts, stop arrangements that they deem flawed and to impose competitive tendering and the offer of Any Qualified Provider. During the Bill’s passage, Monitor’s role as regulator changed from one of ‘promoting competition’ to instead ‘preventing anti-competitive behaviour’, but as some suspected, this is a distinction without a difference .

Far from giving GPs flexible powers to choose the right provision for patients, these regulations force competitive markets across the board, barring only very exceptional circumstances. They bring an inherent assumption that a greater choice of providers is better for patients.

Implementing commercial competition throughout the NHS creates rights for independent providers to compete for any NHS funding that is spent on purchasing services for patients. Such a regime benefits private providers and reorientates the whole system towards the focus on penny-pinching that has just proved fatal to so many at Stafford Hospital . ‘Provider rights’ lock the privatisation of services into place because renationalisation would trigger compensation claims due under competition law, making it extremely expensive and politically difficult for a government to turn back - end quote

Read more here:

http://www.opendemoc


racy.net/ournhs/nico


la-cutcher-lucy-reyn


olds/nhs-as-we-know-


it-needs-prayer

There is still time to prevent this. Write to your MP, or sign the petition. Or do both.

Sign the petition here:

http://you.38degrees


.org.uk/petitions/pe


tition-to-stop-new-n


hs-competition-regul


ations-si257-being-p


assed

Write to your MP here:

http://www.writetoth


em.com
Blimey even the unabridged edition of War & Peace id not as long as your post, got bored after the first two words so skipped the rest of it, but I guess it was your typlical moan fest.
f you do not like or agree with the way the NHS is going it needs to change to get rid of the self inflected damages people such as druggies & drunks.

I take it you will stand by your principles and not make use of the new NHS.

By the way where did it say we would all have to pay for health care what I read it will still be free for people.
[quote][p][bold]Shoebury_Cyclist[/bold] wrote: It doesn't matter if Southend hospital specialises in anything, because on April 1st the tories will 100% privatise the NHS: quote - The regulations force health commissioners to open up virtually all services to competition, either through competitive tendering or using the Any Qualified Provider market. The AQP market operates as the ‘Choose and Book’ system which provides patients with a shopping list of services to chose their treatment from. From the 1st April commissioners will be required to advertise new contracts, then judge the bids received based on published criteria. The new regulations effectively close down the possibility of awarding a contract without competition, saying that this can only occur in very exceptional circumstances (namely emergency situations or when no other provider is capable of providing the same services) . They also pull arrangements between NHS bodies into the new competition regime. This appears totally contrary to former health secretary Andrew Lansley’s assurances to Clinical Commissioning Groups this time last year . The new regulations grant Monitor sweeping statutory powers as a regulator to intervene and enforce competition . Monitor will be able to decide when commissioners have breached competition regulations, and have the authority to set aside contracts, stop arrangements that they deem flawed and to impose competitive tendering and the offer of Any Qualified Provider. During the Bill’s passage, Monitor’s role as regulator changed from one of ‘promoting competition’ to instead ‘preventing anti-competitive behaviour’, but as some suspected, this is a distinction without a difference . Far from giving GPs flexible powers to choose the right provision for patients, these regulations force competitive markets across the board, barring only very exceptional circumstances. They bring an inherent assumption that a greater choice of providers is better for patients. Implementing commercial competition throughout the NHS creates rights for independent providers to compete for any NHS funding that is spent on purchasing services for patients. Such a regime benefits private providers and reorientates the whole system towards the focus on penny-pinching that has just proved fatal to so many at Stafford Hospital . ‘Provider rights’ lock the privatisation of services into place because renationalisation would trigger compensation claims due under competition law, making it extremely expensive and politically difficult for a government to turn back - end quote Read more here: http://www.opendemoc racy.net/ournhs/nico la-cutcher-lucy-reyn olds/nhs-as-we-know- it-needs-prayer There is still time to prevent this. Write to your MP, or sign the petition. Or do both. Sign the petition here: http://you.38degrees .org.uk/petitions/pe tition-to-stop-new-n hs-competition-regul ations-si257-being-p assed Write to your MP here: http://www.writetoth em.com[/p][/quote]Blimey even the unabridged edition of War & Peace id not as long as your post, got bored after the first two words so skipped the rest of it, but I guess it was your typlical moan fest. f you do not like or agree with the way the NHS is going it needs to change to get rid of the self inflected damages people such as druggies & drunks. I take it you will stand by your principles and not make use of the new NHS. By the way where did it say we would all have to pay for health care what I read it will still be free for people. Joe Wildman-Clark

8:22pm Sat 23 Feb 13

Shoebury_Cyclist says...

Joe Wildman-Clark wrote:
Shoebury_Cyclist wrote:
It doesn't matter if Southend hospital specialises in anything, because on April 1st the tories will 100% privatise the NHS:

quote - The regulations force health commissioners to open up virtually all services to competition, either through competitive tendering or using the Any Qualified Provider market. The AQP market operates as the ‘Choose and Book’ system which provides patients with a shopping list of services to chose their treatment from.

From the 1st April commissioners will be required to advertise new contracts, then judge the bids received based on published criteria. The new regulations effectively close down the possibility of awarding a contract without competition, saying that this can only occur in very exceptional circumstances (namely emergency situations or when no other provider is capable of providing the same services) . They also pull arrangements between NHS bodies into the new competition regime. This appears totally contrary to former health secretary Andrew Lansley’s assurances to Clinical Commissioning Groups this time last year .

The new regulations grant Monitor sweeping statutory powers as a regulator to intervene and enforce competition . Monitor will be able to decide when commissioners have breached competition regulations, and have the authority to set aside contracts, stop arrangements that they deem flawed and to impose competitive tendering and the offer of Any Qualified Provider. During the Bill’s passage, Monitor’s role as regulator changed from one of ‘promoting competition’ to instead ‘preventing anti-competitive behaviour’, but as some suspected, this is a distinction without a difference .

Far from giving GPs flexible powers to choose the right provision for patients, these regulations force competitive markets across the board, barring only very exceptional circumstances. They bring an inherent assumption that a greater choice of providers is better for patients.

Implementing commercial competition throughout the NHS creates rights for independent providers to compete for any NHS funding that is spent on purchasing services for patients. Such a regime benefits private providers and reorientates the whole system towards the focus on penny-pinching that has just proved fatal to so many at Stafford Hospital . ‘Provider rights’ lock the privatisation of services into place because renationalisation would trigger compensation claims due under competition law, making it extremely expensive and politically difficult for a government to turn back - end quote

Read more here:

http://www.opendemoc



racy.net/ournhs/nico



la-cutcher-lucy-reyn



olds/nhs-as-we-know-



it-needs-prayer

There is still time to prevent this. Write to your MP, or sign the petition. Or do both.

Sign the petition here:

http://you.38degrees



.org.uk/petitions/pe



tition-to-stop-new-n



hs-competition-regul



ations-si257-being-p



assed

Write to your MP here:

http://www.writetoth



em.com
Blimey even the unabridged edition of War & Peace id not as long as your post, got bored after the first two words so skipped the rest of it, but I guess it was your typlical moan fest.
f you do not like or agree with the way the NHS is going it needs to change to get rid of the self inflected damages people such as druggies & drunks.

I take it you will stand by your principles and not make use of the new NHS.

By the way where did it say we would all have to pay for health care what I read it will still be free for people.
Perhaps you should read the post, like an intelligent person, and then respond to it.

With each of your posts though you prove yourself unable to comprehend anything intelligent.


What are you going to read once the page 3 girls have gone from the Sun and there's no pictures for you to look at?
[quote][p][bold]Joe Wildman-Clark[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Shoebury_Cyclist[/bold] wrote: It doesn't matter if Southend hospital specialises in anything, because on April 1st the tories will 100% privatise the NHS: quote - The regulations force health commissioners to open up virtually all services to competition, either through competitive tendering or using the Any Qualified Provider market. The AQP market operates as the ‘Choose and Book’ system which provides patients with a shopping list of services to chose their treatment from. From the 1st April commissioners will be required to advertise new contracts, then judge the bids received based on published criteria. The new regulations effectively close down the possibility of awarding a contract without competition, saying that this can only occur in very exceptional circumstances (namely emergency situations or when no other provider is capable of providing the same services) . They also pull arrangements between NHS bodies into the new competition regime. This appears totally contrary to former health secretary Andrew Lansley’s assurances to Clinical Commissioning Groups this time last year . The new regulations grant Monitor sweeping statutory powers as a regulator to intervene and enforce competition . Monitor will be able to decide when commissioners have breached competition regulations, and have the authority to set aside contracts, stop arrangements that they deem flawed and to impose competitive tendering and the offer of Any Qualified Provider. During the Bill’s passage, Monitor’s role as regulator changed from one of ‘promoting competition’ to instead ‘preventing anti-competitive behaviour’, but as some suspected, this is a distinction without a difference . Far from giving GPs flexible powers to choose the right provision for patients, these regulations force competitive markets across the board, barring only very exceptional circumstances. They bring an inherent assumption that a greater choice of providers is better for patients. Implementing commercial competition throughout the NHS creates rights for independent providers to compete for any NHS funding that is spent on purchasing services for patients. Such a regime benefits private providers and reorientates the whole system towards the focus on penny-pinching that has just proved fatal to so many at Stafford Hospital . ‘Provider rights’ lock the privatisation of services into place because renationalisation would trigger compensation claims due under competition law, making it extremely expensive and politically difficult for a government to turn back - end quote Read more here: http://www.opendemoc racy.net/ournhs/nico la-cutcher-lucy-reyn olds/nhs-as-we-know- it-needs-prayer There is still time to prevent this. Write to your MP, or sign the petition. Or do both. Sign the petition here: http://you.38degrees .org.uk/petitions/pe tition-to-stop-new-n hs-competition-regul ations-si257-being-p assed Write to your MP here: http://www.writetoth em.com[/p][/quote]Blimey even the unabridged edition of War & Peace id not as long as your post, got bored after the first two words so skipped the rest of it, but I guess it was your typlical moan fest. f you do not like or agree with the way the NHS is going it needs to change to get rid of the self inflected damages people such as druggies & drunks. I take it you will stand by your principles and not make use of the new NHS. By the way where did it say we would all have to pay for health care what I read it will still be free for people.[/p][/quote]Perhaps you should read the post, like an intelligent person, and then respond to it. With each of your posts though you prove yourself unable to comprehend anything intelligent. What are you going to read once the page 3 girls have gone from the Sun and there's no pictures for you to look at? Shoebury_Cyclist

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