Pub chain accused of hypocrisy

Skipp members Patsy Link, Marion Pearce, Mark Sharp and Sheena Walker

Skipp members Patsy Link, Marion Pearce, Mark Sharp and Sheena Walker

First published in News by

A PUB chain has been accused of hypocrisy for naming its pub after a Saxon royal whose remains were found nearby, despite funding only a limited search for new treasure.

Marston’s Inns and Taverns looks set to name the new 180- seat family pub and restaurant it is building in Priory Crescent, Southend, the Saxon Prince, in honour of the royal, whose tomb was unearthed yards away in 2003.

But local historians have attacked the chain, whose archaeological experts only dug three 4-ins-wide boreholes to test if the one-acre pub site, formerly a Toomey Renault car showroom, held any more finds, before workmen moved in.

Sheena Walker, of group Saxon King in Priory Park, which has campaigned for a new museum in the park to house the royal’s remains, said: “It is taking advantage of the find without having any actual interest in the importance of the site.

“If it had any interest it might have put more investment into finding what was on that site.

“It’s pitiful a huge money-making concern like Marston’s can’t give a little bit to find out about our heritage.”

Contractors Wessex Archaeology, which dug the boreholes for the chain, recommended no wider archaeological dig after the holes, which were 16 to 19ft deep, failed to uncover any deposits with “significant palaeoenvironmental potential”.

Southend Council, which demanded a “programme of archaeological work” as a condition of allowing the pub development, has insisted the boreholes were sufficient.

A spokesman said: “Wessex Archaeology undertook a full archaeological evaluation on the site, which found a marsh-like deposit below the modern overburden.

“This marsh area would have created an effective barrier to any settlement in the area, as well as a northern boundary to the cemetery site.

“The boreholes we commissioned followed on from that initial evaluation, with the specific intention of determining whether there was any archaeological, and particularly palaeoenvironmental, potential in the rest of the site.

“The result revealed there was definitely no archaeological or palaeoenvironmental potential.

“If there had been any, further work would have been commissioned.”

But Marion Pearce, 61, of Hamlet Road, Westcliff, who has had five history books published, said: “Small holes dug in the ground is unsatisfactory and exploratory ditch work is needed.

This is essential to a town that wants to call itself a ‘city of culture’.

“It is vital that either the council, or preferably the develo pers, pay for this to be done.”

A Marston’s spokeswoman said: “In terms of the archaeological dig, the scope of this work was specified to us by the local authority via our planning application.

“We carried out our dig as per its specification which was then subsequently signed off.”

The pub is expected to open this spring.

Comments (33)

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5:14pm Fri 14 Feb 14

Bosniavet says...

Aren't Wessex Archaeology one of the organisations that used to contribute to Time Team? In fact I believe they were involved in the "King of Bling" episode which was about the Saxon burial site here in Southend. Surely given their reputation, and previous experience of the site, we should accept their findings.
If SKIPP are so convinced there is something of significance on this particular site, may one ask if they attempted to any official bodies, such as English Heritage, involved - or even arranged their own privately funded survey/dig?
Aren't Wessex Archaeology one of the organisations that used to contribute to Time Team? In fact I believe they were involved in the "King of Bling" episode which was about the Saxon burial site here in Southend. Surely given their reputation, and previous experience of the site, we should accept their findings. If SKIPP are so convinced there is something of significance on this particular site, may one ask if they attempted to any official bodies, such as English Heritage, involved - or even arranged their own privately funded survey/dig? Bosniavet
  • Score: 12

5:14pm Fri 14 Feb 14

beaulocks says...

Never mind about what's underneath, I'm more interested in how how a pints gonna be.
Never mind about what's underneath, I'm more interested in how how a pints gonna be. beaulocks
  • Score: -1

5:20pm Fri 14 Feb 14

Howard Cháse says...

After being severley told off by locals with nothing better to do than whine the pubchain will be remaning the pub The Rusty Clio
After being severley told off by locals with nothing better to do than whine the pubchain will be remaning the pub The Rusty Clio Howard Cháse
  • Score: 16

5:39pm Fri 14 Feb 14

ColonelSpiffSpaff says...

I came here to leave a sarcastic comment but after i read a bit i actually agree
I came here to leave a sarcastic comment but after i read a bit i actually agree ColonelSpiffSpaff
  • Score: -2

5:49pm Fri 14 Feb 14

w-jback says...

It's not Halloween is it?
It's not Halloween is it? w-jback
  • Score: 2

6:07pm Fri 14 Feb 14

the citizen says...

Less hypocritical.....mor
e opportunistic.
Less hypocritical.....mor e opportunistic. the citizen
  • Score: 3

6:14pm Fri 14 Feb 14

emcee says...

I cannot help feeling that a comprehensive archaeological survey of the entire site should have been comissioned, especially after one of the most important finds to come out of Essex, if not the entire UK, was unearthed just yards away.
Three boreholes is just not enough. It really isn't. Even though I have no real problems with building on, and utilising, land for the good of the town, I hope that there was, indeed, no important archaeology under the new development. Three small boreholes will never, ever, give us a true picture. They may give a "best guess" but not answers.
I cannot help feeling that a comprehensive archaeological survey of the entire site should have been comissioned, especially after one of the most important finds to come out of Essex, if not the entire UK, was unearthed just yards away. Three boreholes is just not enough. It really isn't. Even though I have no real problems with building on, and utilising, land for the good of the town, I hope that there was, indeed, no important archaeology under the new development. Three small boreholes will never, ever, give us a true picture. They may give a "best guess" but not answers. emcee
  • Score: 12

6:19pm Fri 14 Feb 14

the citizen says...

emcee wrote:
I cannot help feeling that a comprehensive archaeological survey of the entire site should have been comissioned, especially after one of the most important finds to come out of Essex, if not the entire UK, was unearthed just yards away.
Three boreholes is just not enough. It really isn't. Even though I have no real problems with building on, and utilising, land for the good of the town, I hope that there was, indeed, no important archaeology under the new development. Three small boreholes will never, ever, give us a true picture. They may give a "best guess" but not answers.
A survey of this kind should have been done years ago when the first finds were made. It's a bit late for us to be crying "foul!" now. The time to survey would have been back then, when interest was high and perhaps finance was more readily available.
[quote][p][bold]emcee[/bold] wrote: I cannot help feeling that a comprehensive archaeological survey of the entire site should have been comissioned, especially after one of the most important finds to come out of Essex, if not the entire UK, was unearthed just yards away. Three boreholes is just not enough. It really isn't. Even though I have no real problems with building on, and utilising, land for the good of the town, I hope that there was, indeed, no important archaeology under the new development. Three small boreholes will never, ever, give us a true picture. They may give a "best guess" but not answers.[/p][/quote]A survey of this kind should have been done years ago when the first finds were made. It's a bit late for us to be crying "foul!" now. The time to survey would have been back then, when interest was high and perhaps finance was more readily available. the citizen
  • Score: 7

6:20pm Fri 14 Feb 14

w-jback says...

emcee wrote:
I cannot help feeling that a comprehensive archaeological survey of the entire site should have been comissioned, especially after one of the most important finds to come out of Essex, if not the entire UK, was unearthed just yards away.
Three boreholes is just not enough. It really isn't. Even though I have no real problems with building on, and utilising, land for the good of the town, I hope that there was, indeed, no important archaeology under the new development. Three small boreholes will never, ever, give us a true picture. They may give a "best guess" but not answers.
How many Princes do you think are buried there? surely the prince tomb was "unique"
[quote][p][bold]emcee[/bold] wrote: I cannot help feeling that a comprehensive archaeological survey of the entire site should have been comissioned, especially after one of the most important finds to come out of Essex, if not the entire UK, was unearthed just yards away. Three boreholes is just not enough. It really isn't. Even though I have no real problems with building on, and utilising, land for the good of the town, I hope that there was, indeed, no important archaeology under the new development. Three small boreholes will never, ever, give us a true picture. They may give a "best guess" but not answers.[/p][/quote]How many Princes do you think are buried there? surely the prince tomb was "unique" w-jback
  • Score: -4

6:28pm Fri 14 Feb 14

emcee says...

w-jback wrote:
emcee wrote:
I cannot help feeling that a comprehensive archaeological survey of the entire site should have been comissioned, especially after one of the most important finds to come out of Essex, if not the entire UK, was unearthed just yards away.
Three boreholes is just not enough. It really isn't. Even though I have no real problems with building on, and utilising, land for the good of the town, I hope that there was, indeed, no important archaeology under the new development. Three small boreholes will never, ever, give us a true picture. They may give a "best guess" but not answers.
How many Princes do you think are buried there? surely the prince tomb was "unique"
You seem to have no idea what archaeology is. It is not just about kings, princes and bling, you know.
[quote][p][bold]w-jback[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]emcee[/bold] wrote: I cannot help feeling that a comprehensive archaeological survey of the entire site should have been comissioned, especially after one of the most important finds to come out of Essex, if not the entire UK, was unearthed just yards away. Three boreholes is just not enough. It really isn't. Even though I have no real problems with building on, and utilising, land for the good of the town, I hope that there was, indeed, no important archaeology under the new development. Three small boreholes will never, ever, give us a true picture. They may give a "best guess" but not answers.[/p][/quote]How many Princes do you think are buried there? surely the prince tomb was "unique"[/p][/quote]You seem to have no idea what archaeology is. It is not just about kings, princes and bling, you know. emcee
  • Score: 5

6:29pm Fri 14 Feb 14

Joe Clark says...

I think it was last year (or 2012) that an expert from the Museum of London gave talk at the Library (Victoria Avenue) on the preservation of the artefacts that were originally found, he said at the time of the big dig the area of Toomey Renault was looked at as were records of previous digs and from the construction of the railway line all these stated that the area where the pub is going up was boggy and therefore little occupation or burial would have taken place, instead what is now Priory Park and higher ground nearby would have been the been used.

The Ekco site might hold some archaeology but the cost of digging the entire site would run into £millions purely because of the size of the site and the experts do not come cheap, perhaps these people would sponsor the entire cost?
I think it was last year (or 2012) that an expert from the Museum of London gave talk at the Library (Victoria Avenue) on the preservation of the artefacts that were originally found, he said at the time of the big dig the area of Toomey Renault was looked at as were records of previous digs and from the construction of the railway line all these stated that the area where the pub is going up was boggy and therefore little occupation or burial would have taken place, instead what is now Priory Park and higher ground nearby would have been the been used. The Ekco site might hold some archaeology but the cost of digging the entire site would run into £millions purely because of the size of the site and the experts do not come cheap, perhaps these people would sponsor the entire cost? Joe Clark
  • Score: 10

6:38pm Fri 14 Feb 14

emcee says...

the citizen wrote:
emcee wrote:
I cannot help feeling that a comprehensive archaeological survey of the entire site should have been comissioned, especially after one of the most important finds to come out of Essex, if not the entire UK, was unearthed just yards away.
Three boreholes is just not enough. It really isn't. Even though I have no real problems with building on, and utilising, land for the good of the town, I hope that there was, indeed, no important archaeology under the new development. Three small boreholes will never, ever, give us a true picture. They may give a "best guess" but not answers.
A survey of this kind should have been done years ago when the first finds were made. It's a bit late for us to be crying "foul!" now. The time to survey would have been back then, when interest was high and perhaps finance was more readily available.
There were still a lot of buildings and car parks on the sites of interest at that time. However, I do agree that these surveys should have been done a lot sooner. However, when you own the land, you do not want any development to be hampered by the discovery of important archaeology as it could cost too much. Not only will it hold up development but it could mean that a site could end up scheduled and, thus, development stopped altogether.
The cynic in me feels that this may be why the "minimum" amount of testing was done.
[quote][p][bold]the citizen[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]emcee[/bold] wrote: I cannot help feeling that a comprehensive archaeological survey of the entire site should have been comissioned, especially after one of the most important finds to come out of Essex, if not the entire UK, was unearthed just yards away. Three boreholes is just not enough. It really isn't. Even though I have no real problems with building on, and utilising, land for the good of the town, I hope that there was, indeed, no important archaeology under the new development. Three small boreholes will never, ever, give us a true picture. They may give a "best guess" but not answers.[/p][/quote]A survey of this kind should have been done years ago when the first finds were made. It's a bit late for us to be crying "foul!" now. The time to survey would have been back then, when interest was high and perhaps finance was more readily available.[/p][/quote]There were still a lot of buildings and car parks on the sites of interest at that time. However, I do agree that these surveys should have been done a lot sooner. However, when you own the land, you do not want any development to be hampered by the discovery of important archaeology as it could cost too much. Not only will it hold up development but it could mean that a site could end up scheduled and, thus, development stopped altogether. The cynic in me feels that this may be why the "minimum" amount of testing was done. emcee
  • Score: 9

6:42pm Fri 14 Feb 14

Wizardweb says...

I was always under the impression the "findings" were "discovered" in order to stop the road being widened, hence no survey afterward.
I was always under the impression the "findings" were "discovered" in order to stop the road being widened, hence no survey afterward. Wizardweb
  • Score: 4

7:21pm Fri 14 Feb 14

Steve H says...

So, the 'Saxon Prince' will last much longer than the 'Toomey Showroom' it replaced. What would SKIPP prefer, a car showroom or a pub named in honour of the object of their fight?

Let's get real, there would never be any chance of a great big hole in the ground left as a memorial.
So, the 'Saxon Prince' will last much longer than the 'Toomey Showroom' it replaced. What would SKIPP prefer, a car showroom or a pub named in honour of the object of their fight? Let's get real, there would never be any chance of a great big hole in the ground left as a memorial. Steve H
  • Score: 2

7:26pm Fri 14 Feb 14

Joe Clark says...

Wizardweb wrote:
I was always under the impression the "findings" were "discovered" in order to stop the road being widened, hence no survey afterward.
The finds were thanks to a survey during the works for the F5 road (Priory Crescent widening) scheme they were NOT found during any sort of action to prevent the road.
[quote][p][bold]Wizardweb[/bold] wrote: I was always under the impression the "findings" were "discovered" in order to stop the road being widened, hence no survey afterward.[/p][/quote]The finds were thanks to a survey during the works for the F5 road (Priory Crescent widening) scheme they were NOT found during any sort of action to prevent the road. Joe Clark
  • Score: 3

7:34pm Fri 14 Feb 14

TherealIndiana says...

I worked on several evaluation excavations in the area, one day I found an apple. It proved our search was no longer fruitless!
I worked on several evaluation excavations in the area, one day I found an apple. It proved our search was no longer fruitless! TherealIndiana
  • Score: 13

7:58pm Fri 14 Feb 14

Ed Woods says...

I read the headline and thought here we go again SKIPP moaning yet again.

But after reading the article they actually have a very valid point. If the same techniques of a couple of small boreholes had been applied to the 'Saxon King' site then the site would be under the tarmac of a new road by now and these artifacts would have been lost forever.

With a site of such historical significance a stones throw away the so called archaeological excavations are a joke and I think in this instance SKIPP have made a perfectly valid point.

We will now never know what is under this site as it will be destroyed by bulldozers and concreted over.
I read the headline and thought here we go again SKIPP moaning yet again. But after reading the article they actually have a very valid point. If the same techniques of a couple of small boreholes had been applied to the 'Saxon King' site then the site would be under the tarmac of a new road by now and these artifacts would have been lost forever. With a site of such historical significance a stones throw away the so called archaeological excavations are a joke and I think in this instance SKIPP have made a perfectly valid point. We will now never know what is under this site as it will be destroyed by bulldozers and concreted over. Ed Woods
  • Score: 4

10:48pm Fri 14 Feb 14

You'dfeelbetterforknowingthat says...

Why not name it the Saxon Ponce, as they did the bare minimum, before taking this land, for future profit.
Why not name it the Saxon Ponce, as they did the bare minimum, before taking this land, for future profit. You'dfeelbetterforknowingthat
  • Score: -2

12:27pm Sat 15 Feb 14

nigeltheduck says...

Sorry but who actually cares about the Saxon Prince - not me. SKIPP need to find a better interest in life!
Sorry but who actually cares about the Saxon Prince - not me. SKIPP need to find a better interest in life! nigeltheduck
  • Score: 0

12:32pm Sat 15 Feb 14

Letmetryagain says...

Does it really matter ?
Does it really matter ? Letmetryagain
  • Score: 3

12:42pm Sat 15 Feb 14

TherealIndiana says...

emcee wrote:
I cannot help feeling that a comprehensive archaeological survey of the entire site should have been comissioned, especially after one of the most important finds to come out of Essex, if not the entire UK, was unearthed just yards away.
Three boreholes is just not enough. It really isn't. Even though I have no real problems with building on, and utilising, land for the good of the town, I hope that there was, indeed, no important archaeology under the new development. Three small boreholes will never, ever, give us a true picture. They may give a "best guess" but not answers.
It is English Heritage that have the final decision and their current policy is that if the site is not at risk, then leave it alone for future generations on any future forms of archaeological techniques which are less destructve than current methods.
[quote][p][bold]emcee[/bold] wrote: I cannot help feeling that a comprehensive archaeological survey of the entire site should have been comissioned, especially after one of the most important finds to come out of Essex, if not the entire UK, was unearthed just yards away. Three boreholes is just not enough. It really isn't. Even though I have no real problems with building on, and utilising, land for the good of the town, I hope that there was, indeed, no important archaeology under the new development. Three small boreholes will never, ever, give us a true picture. They may give a "best guess" but not answers.[/p][/quote]It is English Heritage that have the final decision and their current policy is that if the site is not at risk, then leave it alone for future generations on any future forms of archaeological techniques which are less destructve than current methods. TherealIndiana
  • Score: 2

3:03pm Sat 15 Feb 14

RochfordRob says...

The dig revealed there used to be a car showroom on the site.

In a thousand years time some soap dodger will discover the remains of what used to be a grotty pub.
The dig revealed there used to be a car showroom on the site. In a thousand years time some soap dodger will discover the remains of what used to be a grotty pub. RochfordRob
  • Score: 8

7:40pm Sat 15 Feb 14

stopmoaning1 says...

Oh please, it's a pub name.

Pubs all over the world are named after the area they're in or some local history or another.
Oh please, it's a pub name. Pubs all over the world are named after the area they're in or some local history or another. stopmoaning1
  • Score: 11

10:33am Sun 16 Feb 14

Alec Cikes says...

What about having a look at this :)http://www.bmychar
ity.com/charities/So
uthendAirshow
What about having a look at this :)http://www.bmychar ity.com/charities/So uthendAirshow Alec Cikes
  • Score: -3

10:35am Sun 16 Feb 14

Alec Cikes says...

What about having a look at this :)

http://www.bmycharit
y.com/charities/Sout
hendAirshow
What about having a look at this :) http://www.bmycharit y.com/charities/Sout hendAirshow Alec Cikes
  • Score: -3

1:15am Mon 17 Feb 14

runwellian says...

Wherever you stand, someone was here before you. As much as we struggle to move into modern times, there is always someone who wants to cling to the past.
We cannot save everything that is old / ancient, and the so called king, is just a dead bloke, was probably just another dictator like Cameron. titles are handed out like sweeties, but the owner is not always worthy of it.

This is a story about a pub, does anyone really care what a pub is called when they go out for their evening pint?

I am sure the Saxon king doesn't care!
Wherever you stand, someone was here before you. As much as we struggle to move into modern times, there is always someone who wants to cling to the past. We cannot save everything that is old / ancient, and the so called king, is just a dead bloke, was probably just another dictator like Cameron. titles are handed out like sweeties, but the owner is not always worthy of it. This is a story about a pub, does anyone really care what a pub is called when they go out for their evening pint? I am sure the Saxon king doesn't care! runwellian
  • Score: 2

1:48pm Mon 17 Feb 14

southendcivilservant says...

I really don't understand why people are getting so cross about this. The pub will create lots of jobs for this town, jobs which are badly needed. The remains of the prince have already been unearthed, and the pub is going to be named after the prince, so I can't see what more the pub owners could have done. Also, what does it matter which ales the pub sells? Some people completely miss the point of this news story!
I really don't understand why people are getting so cross about this. The pub will create lots of jobs for this town, jobs which are badly needed. The remains of the prince have already been unearthed, and the pub is going to be named after the prince, so I can't see what more the pub owners could have done. Also, what does it matter which ales the pub sells? Some people completely miss the point of this news story! southendcivilservant
  • Score: 6

7:22pm Mon 17 Feb 14

Ed Woods says...

southendcivilservant wrote:
I really don't understand why people are getting so cross about this. The pub will create lots of jobs for this town, jobs which are badly needed. The remains of the prince have already been unearthed, and the pub is going to be named after the prince, so I can't see what more the pub owners could have done. Also, what does it matter which ales the pub sells? Some people completely miss the point of this news story!
Because the whole area is known to be an Anglo Saxon burial ground. The Saxon Prince find could be the tip of the iceberg of other similar sites unknown and undiscovered in the vicinity - a more detailed archaeological survey could uncover more exciting finds.
[quote][p][bold]southendcivilservant[/bold] wrote: I really don't understand why people are getting so cross about this. The pub will create lots of jobs for this town, jobs which are badly needed. The remains of the prince have already been unearthed, and the pub is going to be named after the prince, so I can't see what more the pub owners could have done. Also, what does it matter which ales the pub sells? Some people completely miss the point of this news story![/p][/quote]Because the whole area is known to be an Anglo Saxon burial ground. The Saxon Prince find could be the tip of the iceberg of other similar sites unknown and undiscovered in the vicinity - a more detailed archaeological survey could uncover more exciting finds. Ed Woods
  • Score: 0

11:40pm Mon 17 Feb 14

blucky says...

With the new pubs location being so close the the sewage treatment plant, which as anybody local knows "stinks to high heaven" for most of the year, i pity the smokers and anyone who wants to sit outside the pub enjoying a summers drink, perhaps it should be named " The Smelly Arms"
With the new pubs location being so close the the sewage treatment plant, which as anybody local knows "stinks to high heaven" for most of the year, i pity the smokers and anyone who wants to sit outside the pub enjoying a summers drink, perhaps it should be named " The Smelly Arms" blucky
  • Score: 4

3:54pm Wed 19 Feb 14

Feminism is Dead says...

I don't care what it's being called. It's being built next door to a sewage treatment works so will kick out a right pong when you're trying to have your dinner. Fish n sh!tts anyone?
I don't care what it's being called. It's being built next door to a sewage treatment works so will kick out a right pong when you're trying to have your dinner. Fish n sh!tts anyone? Feminism is Dead
  • Score: 1

6:21pm Wed 19 Feb 14

RochfordRob says...

Ed Woods wrote:
southendcivilservant wrote:
I really don't understand why people are getting so cross about this. The pub will create lots of jobs for this town, jobs which are badly needed. The remains of the prince have already been unearthed, and the pub is going to be named after the prince, so I can't see what more the pub owners could have done. Also, what does it matter which ales the pub sells? Some people completely miss the point of this news story!
Because the whole area is known to be an Anglo Saxon burial ground. The Saxon Prince find could be the tip of the iceberg of other similar sites unknown and undiscovered in the vicinity - a more detailed archaeological survey could uncover more exciting finds.
What, more old bones?

If you want those - nip down Sutton Road.

Exciting? You need to get out a bit more.
[quote][p][bold]Ed Woods[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]southendcivilservant[/bold] wrote: I really don't understand why people are getting so cross about this. The pub will create lots of jobs for this town, jobs which are badly needed. The remains of the prince have already been unearthed, and the pub is going to be named after the prince, so I can't see what more the pub owners could have done. Also, what does it matter which ales the pub sells? Some people completely miss the point of this news story![/p][/quote]Because the whole area is known to be an Anglo Saxon burial ground. The Saxon Prince find could be the tip of the iceberg of other similar sites unknown and undiscovered in the vicinity - a more detailed archaeological survey could uncover more exciting finds.[/p][/quote]What, more old bones? If you want those - nip down Sutton Road. Exciting? You need to get out a bit more. RochfordRob
  • Score: 0

11:57am Thu 20 Feb 14

DannyK86 says...

I sincerely doubt SKIPP (thought they'd given up existing long ago) or commenters on here know much about archaelogical techniques. I guess it depends on how these boreholes were arrayed, but if there is overwhelming evidence of a large marsh/bog that presumably covered a significant amount of land, what is the point of wasting time to dig the whole thing up? You might find a few animal bones or broken pots from a Saxon rubbish dump, but who really cares? The real treasure has been discovered, thankfully.
I sincerely doubt SKIPP (thought they'd given up existing long ago) or commenters on here know much about archaelogical techniques. I guess it depends on how these boreholes were arrayed, but if there is overwhelming evidence of a large marsh/bog that presumably covered a significant amount of land, what is the point of wasting time to dig the whole thing up? You might find a few animal bones or broken pots from a Saxon rubbish dump, but who really cares? The real treasure has been discovered, thankfully. DannyK86
  • Score: 1

12:39pm Thu 20 Feb 14

TherealIndiana says...

There could be a hell of a lot more burials there or there could be none! No body s going to pay for an archaeological excavation on that premise, they cost a lot of money to carryout . after all believe it or not us archaeologists are professionals with mortgages and familys to support and we like wages! You wouldn't expect a engineering company to build something for free! You aldo have to pay all the associated experts to identify, preserve and store any finds, there's a hell of a lot of back room work after something is found.
Hence if it's not in imminent danger, leave it, it ain't going no where! That's why the road widening was shelved, it would've cost the developer too much to carry it out!
There could be a hell of a lot more burials there or there could be none! No body s going to pay for an archaeological excavation on that premise, they cost a lot of money to carryout . after all believe it or not us archaeologists are professionals with mortgages and familys to support and we like wages! You wouldn't expect a engineering company to build something for free! You aldo have to pay all the associated experts to identify, preserve and store any finds, there's a hell of a lot of back room work after something is found. Hence if it's not in imminent danger, leave it, it ain't going no where! That's why the road widening was shelved, it would've cost the developer too much to carry it out! TherealIndiana
  • Score: 1

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