South Essex schools will shut as teachers strike

A previous NUT rally

A previous NUT rally

First published in News
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SCHOOLS in south Essex could face massive disruption next week as part of a national strike by a teachers’ union.

The National Union of Teachers is calling on its members at all schools and sixth form colleges to take action on Wednesday.

It has warned the majority of schools across the area will face disruption, but it is not yet clear howmany schools will close.

Parents face an anxious wait over whether or not to arrange childcare.

Jerry Glazier, general secretary of the Essex teaching union, said: “My experience tells me there will be a large number of schools that will be closed and a large number partly closed.

“In Southend, an absolute majority of teaching staff are members. It’s slightly less across the rest of Essex.”

Mr Glazier added: “The public should know this is a dispute with the secretary of state, over three main areas rather than with a local education authority.

“Our main concerns are the attacks on teachers’ pensions.

We’re still in dispute over pay levels and the workloads on teachers mean they have to work, on average, 55 hours a week in term time in secondary schools and 60-hour weeks in primary schools.”

Nicola Hartley, 49, of the Grand Drive, Leigh, has five children, four of whom attend different schools and colleges in Leigh, Rochford and Benfleet.

She said she had been told two would be open and two closed.

She said: “It isn’t inconvenient for me as I don’t work, but even if it was, I support people’s right to withdraw their labour over pay and conditions and I think headteachers should support their teachers too.”

Sharon Archer’s daughter is in Year 4 at St Margaret’s Church of England School, in Bowers Gifford.

Mrs Archer, 43, of Highland Road, Bowers Gifford, said: “I would expect it to be open and would be disappointed if I were to find out at this late stage the school was closing.

“The school operates an efficient ‘parent mail’ service where we get notifications immediately and I would like to think we would have been contacted with only a week to go.”

Lisa Harrington who has a child at Briscoe Primary School and Nursery, in Pitsea said she didn’t know whether the school would be affected.

Many schools have already announced whether they will open or not.

At King John School in Shipwrights Drive, Thundersley, only Years 11, 12 and 13 will be able to attend lessons.

Palmer’s Sixth Form College in Chadwell Road, Grays, will be shut for lessons, but students can use the library.

Westcliff High School for Boys expects to be fully open, while the De La Salle school, Basildon says it’s too early to say.

South Benfleet Primary School, in the High Road, will have no disruption, but Thundersley Primary School will have a number of classes interrupted.

Other schools are expected to inform parents soon.

A spokesman for the Department for Education said: “Parents will struggle to understand why the union is pressing ahead with strikes over the Government’s measures to let heads pay good teachers more.

“Despite constructive engagement with their concerns, the union is taking action that will disrupt parents' lives, hold back children’s education and damage the reputation of the profession.

Comments (40)

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6:53am Fri 21 Mar 14

Nebs says...

We are always being told how teachers have the best interests of their pupils at heart, and how they all work during the holiday breaks, so surely it would be better to have the strike during the Easter holidays.
We are always being told how teachers have the best interests of their pupils at heart, and how they all work during the holiday breaks, so surely it would be better to have the strike during the Easter holidays. Nebs
  • Score: 0

7:24am Fri 21 Mar 14

Rayleigh Rocket says...

Fair pensions for all. As a tax payer I pay into techers pensions but i cannot afford to pay into my own and my company has also stopped paying in to it.
No teacher has ever payed in my pension but i am forced to pay into theirs.
Fair pensions for all more like greedy public sector
Fair pensions for all. As a tax payer I pay into techers pensions but i cannot afford to pay into my own and my company has also stopped paying in to it. No teacher has ever payed in my pension but i am forced to pay into theirs. Fair pensions for all more like greedy public sector Rayleigh Rocket
  • Score: 8

7:35am Fri 21 Mar 14

morbeous says...

Teachers cause us parents enough trouble as it is with having to take days off work to look after our kids as the have teacher training days. Days like that didnt exist when I was at school. They have enough holidays as it is so why dont they utilise those a bit more. Teachers get enough pay and holiday for what they do so why dont they pay into private pensions like most people do. I have no sympathy for them. They are just greedy ba*****s
Teachers cause us parents enough trouble as it is with having to take days off work to look after our kids as the have teacher training days. Days like that didnt exist when I was at school. They have enough holidays as it is so why dont they utilise those a bit more. Teachers get enough pay and holiday for what they do so why dont they pay into private pensions like most people do. I have no sympathy for them. They are just greedy ba*****s morbeous
  • Score: 0

8:02am Fri 21 Mar 14

ravnos says...

morbeous wrote:
Teachers cause us parents enough trouble as it is with having to take days off work to look after our kids as the have teacher training days. Days like that didnt exist when I was at school. They have enough holidays as it is so why dont they utilise those a bit more. Teachers get enough pay and holiday for what they do so why dont they pay into private pensions like most people do. I have no sympathy for them. They are just greedy ba*****s
you decided to have kids.... you accept the you may actually have to look after them sometime... as for the pensions, private sector earn far more than the public sector, so let them have a half decent pesion for putting up with the little $hit$ at school for 40+ years.
[quote][p][bold]morbeous[/bold] wrote: Teachers cause us parents enough trouble as it is with having to take days off work to look after our kids as the have teacher training days. Days like that didnt exist when I was at school. They have enough holidays as it is so why dont they utilise those a bit more. Teachers get enough pay and holiday for what they do so why dont they pay into private pensions like most people do. I have no sympathy for them. They are just greedy ba*****s[/p][/quote]you decided to have kids.... you accept the you may actually have to look after them sometime... as for the pensions, private sector earn far more than the public sector, so let them have a half decent pesion for putting up with the little $hit$ at school for 40+ years. ravnos
  • Score: 7

8:12am Fri 21 Mar 14

carnmountyouknowitmakessense says...

The strike(s) won't change a thing, not a thing in so far as their pensions.
The strike(s) won't change a thing, not a thing in so far as their pensions. carnmountyouknowitmakessense
  • Score: 3

8:39am Fri 21 Mar 14

profondo asbo says...

why are teachers afraid of performance related pay?
why are teachers afraid of performance related pay? profondo asbo
  • Score: 8

8:45am Fri 21 Mar 14

bazza 1 says...

I wonder if they will get a punitive fine for disrupting the chldrens education, given that parents are fined hundreds of pounds for taking their children out of school for a holiday. If a childs education is hurt badly by going on holiday, just how much damage is being done by making ALL the kids lose days from school. Most strikes are not valid in the financial climate at the present time. The public have little sympathy for workers in jobs that are, in some ways, cushioned from the realities of wage restraint outside of the public sector. People are working jobs with minimum wage, low or zero contracted hours, just to pay the rent. Teachers need to realise the realities of the moment that others are having to put up with. Unemployment and low wages are rife. Be thankful for what you have at present.
I wonder if they will get a punitive fine for disrupting the chldrens education, given that parents are fined hundreds of pounds for taking their children out of school for a holiday. If a childs education is hurt badly by going on holiday, just how much damage is being done by making ALL the kids lose days from school. Most strikes are not valid in the financial climate at the present time. The public have little sympathy for workers in jobs that are, in some ways, cushioned from the realities of wage restraint outside of the public sector. People are working jobs with minimum wage, low or zero contracted hours, just to pay the rent. Teachers need to realise the realities of the moment that others are having to put up with. Unemployment and low wages are rife. Be thankful for what you have at present. bazza 1
  • Score: 11

8:58am Fri 21 Mar 14

Fedup123 says...

I think each parent should send in a fine to the school at the going rate...

If taking them out of school by the parents deprives them of education even for a day is detrimental to their future - so is a day out of class because the teachers are striking no?
I think each parent should send in a fine to the school at the going rate... If taking them out of school by the parents deprives them of education even for a day is detrimental to their future - so is a day out of class because the teachers are striking no? Fedup123
  • Score: 14

9:19am Fri 21 Mar 14

Nebs says...

ravnos wrote:
morbeous wrote:
Teachers cause us parents enough trouble as it is with having to take days off work to look after our kids as the have teacher training days. Days like that didnt exist when I was at school. They have enough holidays as it is so why dont they utilise those a bit more. Teachers get enough pay and holiday for what they do so why dont they pay into private pensions like most people do. I have no sympathy for them. They are just greedy ba*****s
you decided to have kids.... you accept the you may actually have to look after them sometime... as for the pensions, private sector earn far more than the public sector, so let them have a half decent pesion for putting up with the little $hit$ at school for 40+ years.
Your statement that private sector earn far more than the public sector is wrong.

http://www.theguardi
an.com/society/2014/
mar/11/public-sector
-workers-earnings-sq
ueeze
[quote][p][bold]ravnos[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]morbeous[/bold] wrote: Teachers cause us parents enough trouble as it is with having to take days off work to look after our kids as the have teacher training days. Days like that didnt exist when I was at school. They have enough holidays as it is so why dont they utilise those a bit more. Teachers get enough pay and holiday for what they do so why dont they pay into private pensions like most people do. I have no sympathy for them. They are just greedy ba*****s[/p][/quote]you decided to have kids.... you accept the you may actually have to look after them sometime... as for the pensions, private sector earn far more than the public sector, so let them have a half decent pesion for putting up with the little $hit$ at school for 40+ years.[/p][/quote]Your statement that private sector earn far more than the public sector is wrong. http://www.theguardi an.com/society/2014/ mar/11/public-sector -workers-earnings-sq ueeze Nebs
  • Score: 6

9:40am Fri 21 Mar 14

hatch201 says...

if you dont like your pay and condition do what we do in the real world and change jobs simples. If i dont think I'm been paid enough I go find a company who will pay me what I'm worth. Plus if you work in the public sector you need to put the public first!!!!
if you dont like your pay and condition do what we do in the real world and change jobs simples. If i dont think I'm been paid enough I go find a company who will pay me what I'm worth. Plus if you work in the public sector you need to put the public first!!!! hatch201
  • Score: 0

9:47am Fri 21 Mar 14

ravnos says...

Nebs wrote:
ravnos wrote:
morbeous wrote: Teachers cause us parents enough trouble as it is with having to take days off work to look after our kids as the have teacher training days. Days like that didnt exist when I was at school. They have enough holidays as it is so why dont they utilise those a bit more. Teachers get enough pay and holiday for what they do so why dont they pay into private pensions like most people do. I have no sympathy for them. They are just greedy ba*****s
you decided to have kids.... you accept the you may actually have to look after them sometime... as for the pensions, private sector earn far more than the public sector, so let them have a half decent pesion for putting up with the little $hit$ at school for 40+ years.
Your statement that private sector earn far more than the public sector is wrong. http://www.theguardi an.com/society/2014/ mar/11/public-sector -workers-earnings-sq ueeze
that depends on which part you read, and who you believe... Working in in the public sector, looking at comparible roles in the private sector my pay is less. Also, no public sector pay rises for 5 years excluding the senior politicians who gave themselves 11% this year.

There are many arguments to be had, and many different publications you could read and analyse to form an opinion. Unless yoiu work in the public sector and have actual experience of its pay/pension "reforms", you will not have the true facts. Have a look at the PCS and ARC union websites, both will state different facts to the national press...
[quote][p][bold]Nebs[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]ravnos[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]morbeous[/bold] wrote: Teachers cause us parents enough trouble as it is with having to take days off work to look after our kids as the have teacher training days. Days like that didnt exist when I was at school. They have enough holidays as it is so why dont they utilise those a bit more. Teachers get enough pay and holiday for what they do so why dont they pay into private pensions like most people do. I have no sympathy for them. They are just greedy ba*****s[/p][/quote]you decided to have kids.... you accept the you may actually have to look after them sometime... as for the pensions, private sector earn far more than the public sector, so let them have a half decent pesion for putting up with the little $hit$ at school for 40+ years.[/p][/quote]Your statement that private sector earn far more than the public sector is wrong. http://www.theguardi an.com/society/2014/ mar/11/public-sector -workers-earnings-sq ueeze[/p][/quote]that depends on which part you read, and who you believe... Working in in the public sector, looking at comparible roles in the private sector my pay is less. Also, no public sector pay rises for 5 years excluding the senior politicians who gave themselves 11% this year. There are many arguments to be had, and many different publications you could read and analyse to form an opinion. Unless yoiu work in the public sector and have actual experience of its pay/pension "reforms", you will not have the true facts. Have a look at the PCS and ARC union websites, both will state different facts to the national press... ravnos
  • Score: -1

11:21am Fri 21 Mar 14

Letmetryagain says...

Strange isn't it.

Take your child out of school for a holiday, and you can end up in court.
Teachers really don't realise how well off they are.
Strange isn't it. Take your child out of school for a holiday, and you can end up in court. Teachers really don't realise how well off they are. Letmetryagain
  • Score: 5

1:56pm Fri 21 Mar 14

bazza 1 says...

ravnos wrote:
Nebs wrote:
ravnos wrote:
morbeous wrote: Teachers cause us parents enough trouble as it is with having to take days off work to look after our kids as the have teacher training days. Days like that didnt exist when I was at school. They have enough holidays as it is so why dont they utilise those a bit more. Teachers get enough pay and holiday for what they do so why dont they pay into private pensions like most people do. I have no sympathy for them. They are just greedy ba*****s
you decided to have kids.... you accept the you may actually have to look after them sometime... as for the pensions, private sector earn far more than the public sector, so let them have a half decent pesion for putting up with the little $hit$ at school for 40+ years.
Your statement that private sector earn far more than the public sector is wrong. http://www.theguardi an.com/society/2014/ mar/11/public-sector -workers-earnings-sq ueeze
that depends on which part you read, and who you believe... Working in in the public sector, looking at comparible roles in the private sector my pay is less. Also, no public sector pay rises for 5 years excluding the senior politicians who gave themselves 11% this year.

There are many arguments to be had, and many different publications you could read and analyse to form an opinion. Unless yoiu work in the public sector and have actual experience of its pay/pension "reforms", you will not have the true facts. Have a look at the PCS and ARC union websites, both will state different facts to the national press...
What it comes down to, ravnos, is peoples situation regarding their work conditions as they are now, and they see teachers in a well paid, secure, pensionable job.Whereas, many many people who are paying taxes that pay the teachers wages, are in unsecure, low paid, temporary, or part time employment. Whatever way you put it, Jo and Jill Public see someone who is better off than they are, crying over something that they, themselves, don't have. Is it any wonder they get little sympathy from the taxpayer?
[quote][p][bold]ravnos[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Nebs[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]ravnos[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]morbeous[/bold] wrote: Teachers cause us parents enough trouble as it is with having to take days off work to look after our kids as the have teacher training days. Days like that didnt exist when I was at school. They have enough holidays as it is so why dont they utilise those a bit more. Teachers get enough pay and holiday for what they do so why dont they pay into private pensions like most people do. I have no sympathy for them. They are just greedy ba*****s[/p][/quote]you decided to have kids.... you accept the you may actually have to look after them sometime... as for the pensions, private sector earn far more than the public sector, so let them have a half decent pesion for putting up with the little $hit$ at school for 40+ years.[/p][/quote]Your statement that private sector earn far more than the public sector is wrong. http://www.theguardi an.com/society/2014/ mar/11/public-sector -workers-earnings-sq ueeze[/p][/quote]that depends on which part you read, and who you believe... Working in in the public sector, looking at comparible roles in the private sector my pay is less. Also, no public sector pay rises for 5 years excluding the senior politicians who gave themselves 11% this year. There are many arguments to be had, and many different publications you could read and analyse to form an opinion. Unless yoiu work in the public sector and have actual experience of its pay/pension "reforms", you will not have the true facts. Have a look at the PCS and ARC union websites, both will state different facts to the national press...[/p][/quote]What it comes down to, ravnos, is peoples situation regarding their work conditions as they are now, and they see teachers in a well paid, secure, pensionable job.Whereas, many many people who are paying taxes that pay the teachers wages, are in unsecure, low paid, temporary, or part time employment. Whatever way you put it, Jo and Jill Public see someone who is better off than they are, crying over something that they, themselves, don't have. Is it any wonder they get little sympathy from the taxpayer? bazza 1
  • Score: 9

2:08pm Fri 21 Mar 14

canveydude24 says...

Nebs wrote:
We are always being told how teachers have the best interests of their pupils at heart, and how they all work during the holiday breaks, so surely it would be better to have the strike during the Easter holidays.
Then that would be defeating the object wouldn't it, going on strike during school term is meant to draw attention to what the teachers are stiking about by causing closures and disruption.
[quote][p][bold]Nebs[/bold] wrote: We are always being told how teachers have the best interests of their pupils at heart, and how they all work during the holiday breaks, so surely it would be better to have the strike during the Easter holidays.[/p][/quote]Then that would be defeating the object wouldn't it, going on strike during school term is meant to draw attention to what the teachers are stiking about by causing closures and disruption. canveydude24
  • Score: 4

2:46pm Fri 21 Mar 14

profondo asbo says...

what other career can you have a guaranteed job to state pension age, 13 weeks paid holiday and a gold plated final salary pension?
what other career can you have a guaranteed job to state pension age, 13 weeks paid holiday and a gold plated final salary pension? profondo asbo
  • Score: 0

2:59pm Fri 21 Mar 14

Joe Clark says...

You take your kid out of school and face a fine, the teachers strike so you need to keep your kid out of school but they don't get a fine.

There MUST be a change in the law so that those of us who loose money on a strike day can sue the union for the money we loose.

Gold plated pensions near 10 weeks holiday a year life must be so easy being a teacher.
You take your kid out of school and face a fine, the teachers strike so you need to keep your kid out of school but they don't get a fine. There MUST be a change in the law so that those of us who loose money on a strike day can sue the union for the money we loose. Gold plated pensions near 10 weeks holiday a year life must be so easy being a teacher. Joe Clark
  • Score: 3

3:51pm Fri 21 Mar 14

TheaWells says...

Fedup123 wrote:
I think each parent should send in a fine to the school at the going rate...

If taking them out of school by the parents deprives them of education even for a day is detrimental to their future - so is a day out of class because the teachers are striking no?
This!!!

I think the Echo should do a story on this and ask all on facebook if we would like to add to the story. How can it be ok for the teachers but not for the pupils?

We should all en mas send fines in to the head teachers.

Hypocrites!
[quote][p][bold]Fedup123[/bold] wrote: I think each parent should send in a fine to the school at the going rate... If taking them out of school by the parents deprives them of education even for a day is detrimental to their future - so is a day out of class because the teachers are striking no?[/p][/quote]This!!! I think the Echo should do a story on this and ask all on facebook if we would like to add to the story. How can it be ok for the teachers but not for the pupils? We should all en mas send fines in to the head teachers. Hypocrites! TheaWells
  • Score: 5

4:55pm Fri 21 Mar 14

tricklesthegreek says...

morbeous wrote:
Teachers cause us parents enough trouble as it is with having to take days off work to look after our kids as the have teacher training days. Days like that didnt exist when I was at school. They have enough holidays as it is so why dont they utilise those a bit more. Teachers get enough pay and holiday for what they do so why dont they pay into private pensions like most people do. I have no sympathy for them. They are just greedy ba*****s
How old are you then? We used to have them and I am in my forties. They were called 'Bakers' Days' and are actually given by government and the teachers work during those days - if you think they have a day off then you are sadly mistaken. And boo hoo to you for having to take a day off to look after the child YOU decided to bring into the world. Teacher does not equal child-minder. It's about time people like you realised this. You are such a quality individual and no doubt one of the wonderful parents of the little darlings that teachers have to chase around disciplining all day because you think that's their job too.
[quote][p][bold]morbeous[/bold] wrote: Teachers cause us parents enough trouble as it is with having to take days off work to look after our kids as the have teacher training days. Days like that didnt exist when I was at school. They have enough holidays as it is so why dont they utilise those a bit more. Teachers get enough pay and holiday for what they do so why dont they pay into private pensions like most people do. I have no sympathy for them. They are just greedy ba*****s[/p][/quote]How old are you then? We used to have them and I am in my forties. They were called 'Bakers' Days' and are actually given by government and the teachers work during those days - if you think they have a day off then you are sadly mistaken. And boo hoo to you for having to take a day off to look after the child YOU decided to bring into the world. Teacher does not equal child-minder. It's about time people like you realised this. You are such a quality individual and no doubt one of the wonderful parents of the little darlings that teachers have to chase around disciplining all day because you think that's their job too. tricklesthegreek
  • Score: 8

5:07pm Fri 21 Mar 14

tricklesthegreek says...

Teachers aren't getting paid if they strike so in reality their personal fine is a days wages. The moment that moron Michael Gove stops trying to make out that he knows what he is talking about and stops meddling in a profession he clearly has no clue about then I would be almost certain that teachers wouldn't strike any longer. I don't agree with striking myself but if someone who had no clue about your job was telling you what to do and wreaking havoc by inventing new rules and regulations on a whim and a prayer I'm sure you would vote with your feet and go and work in another company. But if you want to continue being a teacher which most of these people do they can't get out of the situation because it is the same in every school. There ARE lots of teachers voting with their feet and leaving the profession for good - and lots of these teachers are ones that we would want teaching our kids but they have simply had enough and taking an easier path in the private sector, often for less money as the private sector is struggling too. Fining parents for taking children out of school was the GOVERNMENT'S idea - stop blaming schools for this because they are merely following a ridiculous law that has been placed upon them. It wouldn't be so bad if the fines went back into the education system but they are being used to make up the deficits elsewhere, with lots of schools going into huge deficit budgets and experiencing cutbacks the same way the NHS has done.
Teachers aren't getting paid if they strike so in reality their personal fine is a days wages. The moment that moron Michael Gove stops trying to make out that he knows what he is talking about and stops meddling in a profession he clearly has no clue about then I would be almost certain that teachers wouldn't strike any longer. I don't agree with striking myself but if someone who had no clue about your job was telling you what to do and wreaking havoc by inventing new rules and regulations on a whim and a prayer I'm sure you would vote with your feet and go and work in another company. But if you want to continue being a teacher which most of these people do they can't get out of the situation because it is the same in every school. There ARE lots of teachers voting with their feet and leaving the profession for good - and lots of these teachers are ones that we would want teaching our kids but they have simply had enough and taking an easier path in the private sector, often for less money as the private sector is struggling too. Fining parents for taking children out of school was the GOVERNMENT'S idea - stop blaming schools for this because they are merely following a ridiculous law that has been placed upon them. It wouldn't be so bad if the fines went back into the education system but they are being used to make up the deficits elsewhere, with lots of schools going into huge deficit budgets and experiencing cutbacks the same way the NHS has done. tricklesthegreek
  • Score: 19

5:39pm Fri 21 Mar 14

Nebs says...

Keep schools open 52 weeks a year, and let pupils and teachers book holidays like in other jobs.
Keep schools open 52 weeks a year, and let pupils and teachers book holidays like in other jobs. Nebs
  • Score: 0

5:53pm Fri 21 Mar 14

EssexBoy1968 says...

Maybe a good idea would be to monitor how many of those teachers who answer the call to strike actually turn up to a demonstration or picket line on the day. Perhaps we could have a rogues gallery of those who spend the day shopping, lunching out or "recovering" from a wild time the night before instead.
Yes, many teachers do work hard, and we constantly hear about the challenging pupils they are faced with, BUT, we must remember that they are well-paid & will receive an index-linked pension of the type most of us can dream of now that most private schemes are closed. And as for claiming they have not had a pay rise for years - aren't they included within the public sector workers who are receiving at least 1% a year whilst many of us in the private sector have not had a rise in years & in some cases, taken pay cuts to remain employed? Sorry, no sympathy from me...
Maybe a good idea would be to monitor how many of those teachers who answer the call to strike actually turn up to a demonstration or picket line on the day. Perhaps we could have a rogues gallery of those who spend the day shopping, lunching out or "recovering" from a wild time the night before instead. Yes, many teachers do work hard, and we constantly hear about the challenging pupils they are faced with, BUT, we must remember that they are well-paid & will receive an index-linked pension of the type most of us can dream of now that most private schemes are closed. And as for claiming they have not had a pay rise for years - aren't they included within the public sector workers who are receiving at least 1% a year whilst many of us in the private sector have not had a rise in years & in some cases, taken pay cuts to remain employed? Sorry, no sympathy from me... EssexBoy1968
  • Score: -5

11:48pm Fri 21 Mar 14

woolstone says...

Nobody seems to think that the government is at fault concerning the educational problems that teachers are striking about, maybe there would not be strikes if Gove listen and took on board some of their concerns. Performance pay is a bad decision it opens up to some Heads abusing this power.
Nobody seems to think that the government is at fault concerning the educational problems that teachers are striking about, maybe there would not be strikes if Gove listen and took on board some of their concerns. Performance pay is a bad decision it opens up to some Heads abusing this power. woolstone
  • Score: 2

7:09am Sat 22 Mar 14

bellend1 says...

Whining parents. Teachers give your children an eduction often under stressful conditions. Just because they stand up for their rights and expect you to take back responsibility for YOUR children for one day, you don't like it.Well you shouldn't have had kids in the first place. They are your responsability, so get over it.. Good luck teachers. You do a great job and deserve all you get and more besides.
Whining parents. Teachers give your children an eduction often under stressful conditions. Just because they stand up for their rights and expect you to take back responsibility for YOUR children for one day, you don't like it.Well you shouldn't have had kids in the first place. They are your responsability, so get over it.. Good luck teachers. You do a great job and deserve all you get and more besides. bellend1
  • Score: 7

12:51pm Sat 22 Mar 14

hornsxandxhalos says...

Honestly I don't see what all the fuss is about, it's only 1 day and I'm sure the kids will be more than happy to get a day off.
Honestly I don't see what all the fuss is about, it's only 1 day and I'm sure the kids will be more than happy to get a day off. hornsxandxhalos
  • Score: 9

5:05pm Sat 22 Mar 14

Living the La Vida Legra says...

Teachers w&n...$
Teachers w&n...$ Living the La Vida Legra
  • Score: -4

3:28pm Sun 23 Mar 14

barneydrop says...

Teachers deserve a decent pension, after all they don't get much time off as they 'work' during the school holdiays.
The teacher training days are necessary for them to learn their trade. Remember they only spent three or four years at university.
If a doctor was given extra 'on job' training, maybe a during a heart transplant operation, perhaps there wouldn't be a problem with the health service.
Anyway, my niece spotted two of her teachers studying very hard on one of their training days. They were working out what was the best value pint at the The Bell pub in Southend.
So, you see they do use those days wisely.
Teachers deserve a decent pension, after all they don't get much time off as they 'work' during the school holdiays. The teacher training days are necessary for them to learn their trade. Remember they only spent three or four years at university. If a doctor was given extra 'on job' training, maybe a during a heart transplant operation, perhaps there wouldn't be a problem with the health service. Anyway, my niece spotted two of her teachers studying very hard on one of their training days. They were working out what was the best value pint at the The Bell pub in Southend. So, you see they do use those days wisely. barneydrop
  • Score: 0

11:31pm Mon 24 Mar 14

Reejay says...

I am a teacher. I have been for ten years. I can completely understand why the public are angry at teachers when they vote to strike. If I never had first hand knowledge of what it was like to be a teacher, then I would to.

Firstly I'd like to clear up a few popular misconceptions about teachers.
1. Teachers are (unfortunately) not paid for their 13 weeks holiday. Their pay is pro rata and divided between twelve months equally. It does look like we are paid for all of this time, but actually we are only paid for 190 teaching days.
2. Training days are a necessary evil…for parents and teachers. Parents dislike them as they cause disruption. Teachers find them tedious and it's often death by PowerPoint. We do have to do very important training though, for instance first aid training, risk assessment, child protection etc Teachers are contracted five additional days on top of their 190 teaching days, specifically for training. They were never meant to be spent with pupils.
3. Pensions are quite good. Not "gold plated", but reasonable. But we do pay a lot for them too. I contribute £300 to my teachers pension per month. They are not free. I will be transparent though. As it stands if I work for 35 years I will get a lump sum of £39,000 and an annual pension of £13,000.
4. We do work long hours. There is a lot of planning and marking to do which usually falls outside the normal school day. This is however part and parcel of being a teacher and not worth complaining about
5. Striking - I do not like to strike. I have been on strike once before and plan to this week. I don't want to, but I have to support my union. I will lose a days pay and I have to stay after work on Thursday for 2 hours to make back some of the time lost.
6. Fining parents for absent children was a government initiative and most teachers believe it to be completely unfair. Holiday time with family for instance is invaluable. Yes, fine parents who consistently take their children out of school, or those who take children out of school during exam time (one parent took their children on holiday in the middle of their eldest's GCSE's)…but a parent whose child is a very good attender and they just want a long weekend for a special occasion? To fine them is completely unfair and teachers for the most part sympathise.
7. Performance related pay - the idea of it is fine. I am happy to receive my pay rises based on my performance, but as a lot of school are hundreds of thousands of pounds in debt it is very easy for senior leadership to save money by not giving people the pay rises when they do deserve them.

So what do we want? To be treated fairly, to be given the time to do our jobs properly and for Michael Gove to stop making changes all the time with no regard for the outcome of his actions. The changes over the last few years have been constant…no time to adjust before everything changes again…rewriting specifications, confusion and exhaustion for both staff and pupils. We want to be led by someone who understands. Changes in the education system are required. Standards need to rise - but things are not improving because at the moment it's the blind leading the not so blind…but the blind think they know it all.

Thank you for reading and I apologise for the inconvenience the strike poses to you and your families.
I am a teacher. I have been for ten years. I can completely understand why the public are angry at teachers when they vote to strike. If I never had first hand knowledge of what it was like to be a teacher, then I would to. Firstly I'd like to clear up a few popular misconceptions about teachers. 1. Teachers are (unfortunately) not paid for their 13 weeks holiday. Their pay is pro rata and divided between twelve months equally. It does look like we are paid for all of this time, but actually we are only paid for 190 teaching days. 2. Training days are a necessary evil…for parents and teachers. Parents dislike them as they cause disruption. Teachers find them tedious and it's often death by PowerPoint. We do have to do very important training though, for instance first aid training, risk assessment, child protection etc Teachers are contracted five additional days on top of their 190 teaching days, specifically for training. They were never meant to be spent with pupils. 3. Pensions are quite good. Not "gold plated", but reasonable. But we do pay a lot for them too. I contribute £300 to my teachers pension per month. They are not free. I will be transparent though. As it stands if I work for 35 years I will get a lump sum of £39,000 and an annual pension of £13,000. 4. We do work long hours. There is a lot of planning and marking to do which usually falls outside the normal school day. This is however part and parcel of being a teacher and not worth complaining about 5. Striking - I do not like to strike. I have been on strike once before and plan to this week. I don't want to, but I have to support my union. I will lose a days pay and I have to stay after work on Thursday for 2 hours to make back some of the time lost. 6. Fining parents for absent children was a government initiative and most teachers believe it to be completely unfair. Holiday time with family for instance is invaluable. Yes, fine parents who consistently take their children out of school, or those who take children out of school during exam time (one parent took their children on holiday in the middle of their eldest's GCSE's)…but a parent whose child is a very good attender and they just want a long weekend for a special occasion? To fine them is completely unfair and teachers for the most part sympathise. 7. Performance related pay - the idea of it is fine. I am happy to receive my pay rises based on my performance, but as a lot of school are hundreds of thousands of pounds in debt it is very easy for senior leadership to save money by not giving people the pay rises when they do deserve them. So what do we want? To be treated fairly, to be given the time to do our jobs properly and for Michael Gove to stop making changes all the time with no regard for the outcome of his actions. The changes over the last few years have been constant…no time to adjust before everything changes again…rewriting specifications, confusion and exhaustion for both staff and pupils. We want to be led by someone who understands. Changes in the education system are required. Standards need to rise - but things are not improving because at the moment it's the blind leading the not so blind…but the blind think they know it all. Thank you for reading and I apologise for the inconvenience the strike poses to you and your families. Reejay
  • Score: 20

11:36pm Mon 24 Mar 14

Reejay says...

Reejay wrote:
I am a teacher. I have been for ten years. I can completely understand why the public are angry at teachers when they vote to strike. If I never had first hand knowledge of what it was like to be a teacher, then I would to.

Firstly I'd like to clear up a few popular misconceptions about teachers.
1. Teachers are (unfortunately) not paid for their 13 weeks holiday. Their pay is pro rata and divided between twelve months equally. It does look like we are paid for all of this time, but actually we are only paid for 190 teaching days.
2. Training days are a necessary evil…for parents and teachers. Parents dislike them as they cause disruption. Teachers find them tedious and it's often death by PowerPoint. We do have to do very important training though, for instance first aid training, risk assessment, child protection etc Teachers are contracted five additional days on top of their 190 teaching days, specifically for training. They were never meant to be spent with pupils.
3. Pensions are quite good. Not "gold plated", but reasonable. But we do pay a lot for them too. I contribute £300 to my teachers pension per month. They are not free. I will be transparent though. As it stands if I work for 35 years I will get a lump sum of £39,000 and an annual pension of £13,000.
4. We do work long hours. There is a lot of planning and marking to do which usually falls outside the normal school day. This is however part and parcel of being a teacher and not worth complaining about
5. Striking - I do not like to strike. I have been on strike once before and plan to this week. I don't want to, but I have to support my union. I will lose a days pay and I have to stay after work on Thursday for 2 hours to make back some of the time lost.
6. Fining parents for absent children was a government initiative and most teachers believe it to be completely unfair. Holiday time with family for instance is invaluable. Yes, fine parents who consistently take their children out of school, or those who take children out of school during exam time (one parent took their children on holiday in the middle of their eldest's GCSE's)…but a parent whose child is a very good attender and they just want a long weekend for a special occasion? To fine them is completely unfair and teachers for the most part sympathise.
7. Performance related pay - the idea of it is fine. I am happy to receive my pay rises based on my performance, but as a lot of school are hundreds of thousands of pounds in debt it is very easy for senior leadership to save money by not giving people the pay rises when they do deserve them.

So what do we want? To be treated fairly, to be given the time to do our jobs properly and for Michael Gove to stop making changes all the time with no regard for the outcome of his actions. The changes over the last few years have been constant…no time to adjust before everything changes again…rewriting specifications, confusion and exhaustion for both staff and pupils. We want to be led by someone who understands. Changes in the education system are required. Standards need to rise - but things are not improving because at the moment it's the blind leading the not so blind…but the blind think they know it all.

Thank you for reading and I apologise for the inconvenience the strike poses to you and your families.
Where the pension is concerned I forgot to mention that I have a managerial role and receive a higher than average wage. A normal classroom teachers pension would reflect a lower rate of pay.
[quote][p][bold]Reejay[/bold] wrote: I am a teacher. I have been for ten years. I can completely understand why the public are angry at teachers when they vote to strike. If I never had first hand knowledge of what it was like to be a teacher, then I would to. Firstly I'd like to clear up a few popular misconceptions about teachers. 1. Teachers are (unfortunately) not paid for their 13 weeks holiday. Their pay is pro rata and divided between twelve months equally. It does look like we are paid for all of this time, but actually we are only paid for 190 teaching days. 2. Training days are a necessary evil…for parents and teachers. Parents dislike them as they cause disruption. Teachers find them tedious and it's often death by PowerPoint. We do have to do very important training though, for instance first aid training, risk assessment, child protection etc Teachers are contracted five additional days on top of their 190 teaching days, specifically for training. They were never meant to be spent with pupils. 3. Pensions are quite good. Not "gold plated", but reasonable. But we do pay a lot for them too. I contribute £300 to my teachers pension per month. They are not free. I will be transparent though. As it stands if I work for 35 years I will get a lump sum of £39,000 and an annual pension of £13,000. 4. We do work long hours. There is a lot of planning and marking to do which usually falls outside the normal school day. This is however part and parcel of being a teacher and not worth complaining about 5. Striking - I do not like to strike. I have been on strike once before and plan to this week. I don't want to, but I have to support my union. I will lose a days pay and I have to stay after work on Thursday for 2 hours to make back some of the time lost. 6. Fining parents for absent children was a government initiative and most teachers believe it to be completely unfair. Holiday time with family for instance is invaluable. Yes, fine parents who consistently take their children out of school, or those who take children out of school during exam time (one parent took their children on holiday in the middle of their eldest's GCSE's)…but a parent whose child is a very good attender and they just want a long weekend for a special occasion? To fine them is completely unfair and teachers for the most part sympathise. 7. Performance related pay - the idea of it is fine. I am happy to receive my pay rises based on my performance, but as a lot of school are hundreds of thousands of pounds in debt it is very easy for senior leadership to save money by not giving people the pay rises when they do deserve them. So what do we want? To be treated fairly, to be given the time to do our jobs properly and for Michael Gove to stop making changes all the time with no regard for the outcome of his actions. The changes over the last few years have been constant…no time to adjust before everything changes again…rewriting specifications, confusion and exhaustion for both staff and pupils. We want to be led by someone who understands. Changes in the education system are required. Standards need to rise - but things are not improving because at the moment it's the blind leading the not so blind…but the blind think they know it all. Thank you for reading and I apologise for the inconvenience the strike poses to you and your families.[/p][/quote]Where the pension is concerned I forgot to mention that I have a managerial role and receive a higher than average wage. A normal classroom teachers pension would reflect a lower rate of pay. Reejay
  • Score: 6

9:52pm Tue 25 Mar 14

E.C.M. says...

Rayleigh Rocket wrote:
Fair pensions for all. As a tax payer I pay into techers pensions but i cannot afford to pay into my own and my company has also stopped paying in to it. No teacher has ever payed in my pension but i am forced to pay into theirs. Fair pensions for all more like greedy public sector
Why didn't you become a teacher then...you had the choice?!

If you can read this...thank a teacher!
[quote][p][bold]Rayleigh Rocket[/bold] wrote: Fair pensions for all. As a tax payer I pay into techers pensions but i cannot afford to pay into my own and my company has also stopped paying in to it. No teacher has ever payed in my pension but i am forced to pay into theirs. Fair pensions for all more like greedy public sector[/p][/quote]Why didn't you become a teacher then...you had the choice?! If you can read this...thank a teacher! E.C.M.
  • Score: 7

10:05pm Tue 25 Mar 14

E.C.M. says...

morbeous wrote:
Teachers cause us parents enough trouble as it is with having to take days off work to look after our kids as the have teacher training days. Days like that didnt exist when I was at school. They have enough holidays as it is so why dont they utilise those a bit more. Teachers get enough pay and holiday for what they do so why dont they pay into private pensions like most people do. I have no sympathy for them. They are just greedy ba*****s
If we didn't have teacher training days to keep up with the continuous changes to the curriculum etc. (thanks to the clueless Mr. Gove), your little cherubs wouldn't receive an up to date education!

Things and the world has changed since you went to school...and continue to do so at a rapid pace!

Life is about decisions! You could have chosen to be teacher...and you had the choice to have children!

If you can read this...thank a teacher!
[quote][p][bold]morbeous[/bold] wrote: Teachers cause us parents enough trouble as it is with having to take days off work to look after our kids as the have teacher training days. Days like that didnt exist when I was at school. They have enough holidays as it is so why dont they utilise those a bit more. Teachers get enough pay and holiday for what they do so why dont they pay into private pensions like most people do. I have no sympathy for them. They are just greedy ba*****s[/p][/quote]If we didn't have teacher training days to keep up with the continuous changes to the curriculum etc. (thanks to the clueless Mr. Gove), your little cherubs wouldn't receive an up to date education! Things and the world has changed since you went to school...and continue to do so at a rapid pace! Life is about decisions! You could have chosen to be teacher...and you had the choice to have children! If you can read this...thank a teacher! E.C.M.
  • Score: 1

10:10pm Tue 25 Mar 14

E.C.M. says...

profondo asbo wrote:
why are teachers afraid of performance related pay?
Because "not everything that be counted, counts...and not everything that counts, can be counted"! (Albert Einstein)

If you can read this...thank a teacher!
[quote][p][bold]profondo asbo[/bold] wrote: why are teachers afraid of performance related pay?[/p][/quote]Because "not everything that be counted, counts...and not everything that counts, can be counted"! (Albert Einstein) If you can read this...thank a teacher! E.C.M.
  • Score: 3

10:19pm Tue 25 Mar 14

E.C.M. says...

bazza 1 wrote:
I wonder if they will get a punitive fine for disrupting the chldrens education, given that parents are fined hundreds of pounds for taking their children out of school for a holiday. If a childs education is hurt badly by going on holiday, just how much damage is being done by making ALL the kids lose days from school. Most strikes are not valid in the financial climate at the present time. The public have little sympathy for workers in jobs that are, in some ways, cushioned from the realities of wage restraint outside of the public sector. People are working jobs with minimum wage, low or zero contracted hours, just to pay the rent. Teachers need to realise the realities of the moment that others are having to put up with. Unemployment and low wages are rife. Be thankful for what you have at present.
" For children LOVE is spelt T.I.M.E"! (Carol Dwek).

Spend a little with yours for a change and stop whinging your free babysitting service is closed for one single day!
[quote][p][bold]bazza 1[/bold] wrote: I wonder if they will get a punitive fine for disrupting the chldrens education, given that parents are fined hundreds of pounds for taking their children out of school for a holiday. If a childs education is hurt badly by going on holiday, just how much damage is being done by making ALL the kids lose days from school. Most strikes are not valid in the financial climate at the present time. The public have little sympathy for workers in jobs that are, in some ways, cushioned from the realities of wage restraint outside of the public sector. People are working jobs with minimum wage, low or zero contracted hours, just to pay the rent. Teachers need to realise the realities of the moment that others are having to put up with. Unemployment and low wages are rife. Be thankful for what you have at present.[/p][/quote]" For children LOVE is spelt T.I.M.E"! (Carol Dwek). Spend a little with yours for a change and stop whinging your free babysitting service is closed for one single day! E.C.M.
  • Score: 3

10:33pm Tue 25 Mar 14

E.C.M. says...

hatch201 wrote:
if you dont like your pay and condition do what we do in the real world and change jobs simples. If i dont think I'm been paid enough I go find a company who will pay me what I'm worth. Plus if you work in the public sector you need to put the public first!!!!
Perhaps, I can visit your home tomorrow and provide you with a a tutorial in literacy? Your text is an embarrassment, strewn with grammatical errors!

Lets say £25 an hour…you learn and I can subsidise my lost earnings for my justified strike action…lovely jublee, everyone’s a winner!

If you can read this...thank a teacher!
[quote][p][bold]hatch201[/bold] wrote: if you dont like your pay and condition do what we do in the real world and change jobs simples. If i dont think I'm been paid enough I go find a company who will pay me what I'm worth. Plus if you work in the public sector you need to put the public first!!!![/p][/quote]Perhaps, I can visit your home tomorrow and provide you with a a tutorial in literacy? Your text is an embarrassment, strewn with grammatical errors! Lets say £25 an hour…you learn and I can subsidise my lost earnings for my justified strike action…lovely jublee, everyone’s a winner! If you can read this...thank a teacher! E.C.M.
  • Score: 4

10:38pm Tue 25 Mar 14

E.C.M. says...

Letmetryagain wrote:
Strange isn't it. Take your child out of school for a holiday, and you can end up in court. Teachers really don't realise how well off they are.
Agreed, we are lucky...it's the best job in the world!

And you had the choice to be one!

If you can read this...thank a teacher!
[quote][p][bold]Letmetryagain[/bold] wrote: Strange isn't it. Take your child out of school for a holiday, and you can end up in court. Teachers really don't realise how well off they are.[/p][/quote]Agreed, we are lucky...it's the best job in the world! And you had the choice to be one! If you can read this...thank a teacher! E.C.M.
  • Score: 3

10:46pm Tue 25 Mar 14

E.C.M. says...

EssexBoy1968 wrote:
Maybe a good idea would be to monitor how many of those teachers who answer the call to strike actually turn up to a demonstration or picket line on the day. Perhaps we could have a rogues gallery of those who spend the day shopping, lunching out or "recovering" from a wild time the night before instead. Yes, many teachers do work hard, and we constantly hear about the challenging pupils they are faced with, BUT, we must remember that they are well-paid & will receive an index-linked pension of the type most of us can dream of now that most private schemes are closed. And as for claiming they have not had a pay rise for years - aren't they included within the public sector workers who are receiving at least 1% a year whilst many of us in the private sector have not had a rise in years & in some cases, taken pay cuts to remain employed? Sorry, no sympathy from me...
Oooh the green eyed monster...jealousy is such a terrible thing!

You can/could be a teacher...you have the choice!

If you can read this...thank a teacher!
[quote][p][bold]EssexBoy1968[/bold] wrote: Maybe a good idea would be to monitor how many of those teachers who answer the call to strike actually turn up to a demonstration or picket line on the day. Perhaps we could have a rogues gallery of those who spend the day shopping, lunching out or "recovering" from a wild time the night before instead. Yes, many teachers do work hard, and we constantly hear about the challenging pupils they are faced with, BUT, we must remember that they are well-paid & will receive an index-linked pension of the type most of us can dream of now that most private schemes are closed. And as for claiming they have not had a pay rise for years - aren't they included within the public sector workers who are receiving at least 1% a year whilst many of us in the private sector have not had a rise in years & in some cases, taken pay cuts to remain employed? Sorry, no sympathy from me...[/p][/quote]Oooh the green eyed monster...jealousy is such a terrible thing! You can/could be a teacher...you have the choice! If you can read this...thank a teacher! E.C.M.
  • Score: 3

10:58pm Tue 25 Mar 14

E.C.M. says...

profondo asbo wrote:
what other career can you have a guaranteed job to state pension age, 13 weeks paid holiday and a gold plated final salary pension?
You had the choice! If you can read this...thank a teacher!
[quote][p][bold]profondo asbo[/bold] wrote: what other career can you have a guaranteed job to state pension age, 13 weeks paid holiday and a gold plated final salary pension?[/p][/quote]You had the choice! If you can read this...thank a teacher! E.C.M.
  • Score: 2

11:12pm Tue 25 Mar 14

E.C.M. says...

barneydrop wrote:
Teachers deserve a decent pension, after all they don't get much time off as they 'work' during the school holdiays. The teacher training days are necessary for them to learn their trade. Remember they only spent three or four years at university. If a doctor was given extra 'on job' training, maybe a during a heart transplant operation, perhaps there wouldn't be a problem with the health service. Anyway, my niece spotted two of her teachers studying very hard on one of their training days. They were working out what was the best value pint at the The Bell pub in Southend. So, you see they do use those days wisely.
First rule of comedy...be funny!

Sadly, you know five eigths of nothing and are obviously clueless!

Why don't you give it a go...you don't even have to be qualified these days?!

If you can read this...thank a teacher!
[quote][p][bold]barneydrop[/bold] wrote: Teachers deserve a decent pension, after all they don't get much time off as they 'work' during the school holdiays. The teacher training days are necessary for them to learn their trade. Remember they only spent three or four years at university. If a doctor was given extra 'on job' training, maybe a during a heart transplant operation, perhaps there wouldn't be a problem with the health service. Anyway, my niece spotted two of her teachers studying very hard on one of their training days. They were working out what was the best value pint at the The Bell pub in Southend. So, you see they do use those days wisely.[/p][/quote]First rule of comedy...be funny! Sadly, you know five eigths of nothing and are obviously clueless! Why don't you give it a go...you don't even have to be qualified these days?! If you can read this...thank a teacher! E.C.M.
  • Score: 0

11:48pm Tue 25 Mar 14

E.C.M. says...

Jeeez, look at the time! I’m normally tucked up in bed by now on a school night!

Thank God for a strike day!

No 7:30am start in my classroom,
No marking hundreds of books with positive comments and advice,
No planning all singing and dancing lessons, to guarantee engagement,
No continuous assessment of student progress,
No lazy, unruly and disaffected pupils to babysit,
No break duty, missing the only opportunity to visit the bathroom,
No whinging parents, deflecting their own responsibilities,
No students swearing and using foul & abusive language,
No raising my voice at students lacking social skills,
No CPD meeting,
No 6:00pm finish,
No need to be continuously creative to inspire, cajole and motivate,

God I’m gonna miss it! Roll on Thursday…not for the money, but for the love of the best job in the world!
Jeeez, look at the time! I’m normally tucked up in bed by now on a school night! Thank God for a strike day! No 7:30am start in my classroom, No marking hundreds of books with positive comments and advice, No planning all singing and dancing lessons, to guarantee engagement, No continuous assessment of student progress, No lazy, unruly and disaffected pupils to babysit, No break duty, missing the only opportunity to visit the bathroom, No whinging parents, deflecting their own responsibilities, No students swearing and using foul & abusive language, No raising my voice at students lacking social skills, No CPD meeting, No 6:00pm finish, No need to be continuously creative to inspire, cajole and motivate, God I’m gonna miss it! Roll on Thursday…not for the money, but for the love of the best job in the world! E.C.M.
  • Score: 9

10:01am Wed 26 Mar 14

Car1988 says...

Reejay wrote:
I am a teacher. I have been for ten years. I can completely understand why the public are angry at teachers when they vote to strike. If I never had first hand knowledge of what it was like to be a teacher, then I would to.

Firstly I'd like to clear up a few popular misconceptions about teachers.
1. Teachers are (unfortunately) not paid for their 13 weeks holiday. Their pay is pro rata and divided between twelve months equally. It does look like we are paid for all of this time, but actually we are only paid for 190 teaching days.
2. Training days are a necessary evil…for parents and teachers. Parents dislike them as they cause disruption. Teachers find them tedious and it's often death by PowerPoint. We do have to do very important training though, for instance first aid training, risk assessment, child protection etc Teachers are contracted five additional days on top of their 190 teaching days, specifically for training. They were never meant to be spent with pupils.
3. Pensions are quite good. Not "gold plated", but reasonable. But we do pay a lot for them too. I contribute £300 to my teachers pension per month. They are not free. I will be transparent though. As it stands if I work for 35 years I will get a lump sum of £39,000 and an annual pension of £13,000.
4. We do work long hours. There is a lot of planning and marking to do which usually falls outside the normal school day. This is however part and parcel of being a teacher and not worth complaining about
5. Striking - I do not like to strike. I have been on strike once before and plan to this week. I don't want to, but I have to support my union. I will lose a days pay and I have to stay after work on Thursday for 2 hours to make back some of the time lost.
6. Fining parents for absent children was a government initiative and most teachers believe it to be completely unfair. Holiday time with family for instance is invaluable. Yes, fine parents who consistently take their children out of school, or those who take children out of school during exam time (one parent took their children on holiday in the middle of their eldest's GCSE's)…but a parent whose child is a very good attender and they just want a long weekend for a special occasion? To fine them is completely unfair and teachers for the most part sympathise.
7. Performance related pay - the idea of it is fine. I am happy to receive my pay rises based on my performance, but as a lot of school are hundreds of thousands of pounds in debt it is very easy for senior leadership to save money by not giving people the pay rises when they do deserve them.

So what do we want? To be treated fairly, to be given the time to do our jobs properly and for Michael Gove to stop making changes all the time with no regard for the outcome of his actions. The changes over the last few years have been constant…no time to adjust before everything changes again…rewriting specifications, confusion and exhaustion for both staff and pupils. We want to be led by someone who understands. Changes in the education system are required. Standards need to rise - but things are not improving because at the moment it's the blind leading the not so blind…but the blind think they know it all.

Thank you for reading and I apologise for the inconvenience the strike poses to you and your families.
Such true points.

A few extra things:

Teachers have £30,000 of debt just to train, they jump through many hoops before they become a teacher; observations, skills tests, GCSE requirements, A levels, interviews where there may be ten applicants for one place, QTS standards and much more.

As for teachers in the pub on training days... some schools ask their teachers to complete their training days during evenings throughout the year called twilights, for example 4pm-8pm for two evenings (1 standard training day) with their usual CPD on another day. ( They still have to complete their usual evening work on these days too.) When this happens teachers will gain their training days as lieu days, because these are in addition to the 190 teaching days they are paid for.

I am a teacher now on an acceptable wage, where I pay £150 a month into a pension. My husband earns £5,000 a year more than me and only pays £78 a month in his private sector pension.

In contrast to many I know both sides of the coin. For 5 years, I worked for minimum wage in a supermarket. Both jobs are challenging, but teaching isn't just a job because if it was you wouldn't do it! On many occasions the only reason you accommodate every change, piece of paper, new policy etc is because you repeat over and over in your head it's for the children, it's for the children.

Teachers are expected to give and give but there has to be a point where we say NO!
[quote][p][bold]Reejay[/bold] wrote: I am a teacher. I have been for ten years. I can completely understand why the public are angry at teachers when they vote to strike. If I never had first hand knowledge of what it was like to be a teacher, then I would to. Firstly I'd like to clear up a few popular misconceptions about teachers. 1. Teachers are (unfortunately) not paid for their 13 weeks holiday. Their pay is pro rata and divided between twelve months equally. It does look like we are paid for all of this time, but actually we are only paid for 190 teaching days. 2. Training days are a necessary evil…for parents and teachers. Parents dislike them as they cause disruption. Teachers find them tedious and it's often death by PowerPoint. We do have to do very important training though, for instance first aid training, risk assessment, child protection etc Teachers are contracted five additional days on top of their 190 teaching days, specifically for training. They were never meant to be spent with pupils. 3. Pensions are quite good. Not "gold plated", but reasonable. But we do pay a lot for them too. I contribute £300 to my teachers pension per month. They are not free. I will be transparent though. As it stands if I work for 35 years I will get a lump sum of £39,000 and an annual pension of £13,000. 4. We do work long hours. There is a lot of planning and marking to do which usually falls outside the normal school day. This is however part and parcel of being a teacher and not worth complaining about 5. Striking - I do not like to strike. I have been on strike once before and plan to this week. I don't want to, but I have to support my union. I will lose a days pay and I have to stay after work on Thursday for 2 hours to make back some of the time lost. 6. Fining parents for absent children was a government initiative and most teachers believe it to be completely unfair. Holiday time with family for instance is invaluable. Yes, fine parents who consistently take their children out of school, or those who take children out of school during exam time (one parent took their children on holiday in the middle of their eldest's GCSE's)…but a parent whose child is a very good attender and they just want a long weekend for a special occasion? To fine them is completely unfair and teachers for the most part sympathise. 7. Performance related pay - the idea of it is fine. I am happy to receive my pay rises based on my performance, but as a lot of school are hundreds of thousands of pounds in debt it is very easy for senior leadership to save money by not giving people the pay rises when they do deserve them. So what do we want? To be treated fairly, to be given the time to do our jobs properly and for Michael Gove to stop making changes all the time with no regard for the outcome of his actions. The changes over the last few years have been constant…no time to adjust before everything changes again…rewriting specifications, confusion and exhaustion for both staff and pupils. We want to be led by someone who understands. Changes in the education system are required. Standards need to rise - but things are not improving because at the moment it's the blind leading the not so blind…but the blind think they know it all. Thank you for reading and I apologise for the inconvenience the strike poses to you and your families.[/p][/quote]Such true points. A few extra things: Teachers have £30,000 of debt just to train, they jump through many hoops before they become a teacher; observations, skills tests, GCSE requirements, A levels, interviews where there may be ten applicants for one place, QTS standards and much more. As for teachers in the pub on training days... some schools ask their teachers to complete their training days during evenings throughout the year called twilights, for example 4pm-8pm for two evenings (1 standard training day) with their usual CPD on another day. ( They still have to complete their usual evening work on these days too.) When this happens teachers will gain their training days as lieu days, because these are in addition to the 190 teaching days they are paid for. I am a teacher now on an acceptable wage, where I pay £150 a month into a pension. My husband earns £5,000 a year more than me and only pays £78 a month in his private sector pension. In contrast to many I know both sides of the coin. For 5 years, I worked for minimum wage in a supermarket. Both jobs are challenging, but teaching isn't just a job because if it was you wouldn't do it! On many occasions the only reason you accommodate every change, piece of paper, new policy etc is because you repeat over and over in your head it's for the children, it's for the children. Teachers are expected to give and give but there has to be a point where we say NO! Car1988
  • Score: 6

10:21am Thu 27 Mar 14

woolstone says...

For those that think they know about teaching and are not teachers may I suggest you read the "2013 Teachers Workload Survey" that was done on behalf of the Department of Education. Then write your comments.
For those that think they know about teaching and are not teachers may I suggest you read the "2013 Teachers Workload Survey" that was done on behalf of the Department of Education. Then write your comments. woolstone
  • Score: 2

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