UPDATED: Hundreds of suspected paedophiles arrested in nationwide operation

Echo: Hundreds of suspected paedophiles arrested Hundreds of suspected paedophiles arrested

DOZENS Of homes in Essex have been raided as part of a national operation to catch hundreds of suspected paedophiles.

Doctors, teachers and scout leaders were among the 660 people taken into custody across the country.

Essex Police estimate 20 children in the county, and more than 400 nationally, have been protected as a result.

31 raids were carried out in Essex with 24 men arrested on suspicion of possessing indecent images of children.

Det Insp Danny Stoten said: “We have been working closely with the National Crime Agency to develop this intelligence, execute search warrants and make arrests whenever possible.

“The information has allowed us to pick up a range of suspects previously operating under the radar.

"Offenders need to know the internet is not a safe anonymous space for accessing indecent images.”

There were nine raids in Colchester, three in Tendring, five in Chelmsford, four in Basildon, five in Southend and five in Harlow.

In total 45 police forces supported the operation led by the National Crime Agency

 

39 of the 660 arrested were registered sex offenders but the rest were previously unknown to police.

The operation targeted people accessing indecent images of children online but details of how they were identified will remain secret.

NCA Deputy Director General Phil Gormley said: “This is the first time the UK has had the capability to co-ordinate a single targeted operation of this nature.

"Over the past six months we have seen unprecedented levels of cooperation to deliver this result.

“Our aim is to protect children who were victims of, or might be at risk of, sexual exploitation.

"A child is victimised not only when they are abused and an image is taken, they are victimised every time that image is viewed by someone."

“Some of the people who start by accessing indecent images online go on to abuse children directly."

All 24 arrested in Essex are currently on police bail.

Anyone with information relating to child sexual exploitation or who suspects someone is using the internet to access indecent images call the Essex Police online investigation team on 101.

Comments (26)

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12:24pm Wed 16 Jul 14

Say It As It Is OK? says...

It's worrying, but not surprising that some of those arrested include doctors, teachers, scout leaders, care workers, former police officers and other professionals with access to children. It's been a long term belief and well known that some of these people seek a profession that provides easy access to children. They need weeding out because they are to all bad.
It's worrying, but not surprising that some of those arrested include doctors, teachers, scout leaders, care workers, former police officers and other professionals with access to children. It's been a long term belief and well known that some of these people seek a profession that provides easy access to children. They need weeding out because they are to all bad. Say It As It Is OK?
  • Score: 32

12:39pm Wed 16 Jul 14

supermadmax says...

Scout Leaders and police - the same old usual suspects.
Scout Leaders and police - the same old usual suspects. supermadmax
  • Score: 9

1:09pm Wed 16 Jul 14

Say It As It Is OK? says...

Say It As It Is OK? wrote:
It's worrying, but not surprising that some of those arrested include doctors, teachers, scout leaders, care workers, former police officers and other professionals with access to children. It's been a long term belief and well known that some of these people seek a profession that provides easy access to children. They need weeding out because they are to all bad.
Sorry the last sentence should have read:
They need weeding out because they are not all bad!
[quote][p][bold]Say It As It Is OK?[/bold] wrote: It's worrying, but not surprising that some of those arrested include doctors, teachers, scout leaders, care workers, former police officers and other professionals with access to children. It's been a long term belief and well known that some of these people seek a profession that provides easy access to children. They need weeding out because they are to all bad.[/p][/quote]Sorry the last sentence should have read: They need weeding out because they are not all bad! Say It As It Is OK?
  • Score: 19

1:11pm Wed 16 Jul 14

Say It As It Is OK? says...

Say It As It Is OK? wrote:
It's worrying, but not surprising that some of those arrested include doctors, teachers, scout leaders, care workers, former police officers and other professionals with access to children. It's been a long term belief and well known that some of these people seek a profession that provides easy access to children. They need weeding out because they are to all bad.
Sorry the last sentence should have read:
They need weeding out because they are not all bad!
[quote][p][bold]Say It As It Is OK?[/bold] wrote: It's worrying, but not surprising that some of those arrested include doctors, teachers, scout leaders, care workers, former police officers and other professionals with access to children. It's been a long term belief and well known that some of these people seek a profession that provides easy access to children. They need weeding out because they are to all bad.[/p][/quote]Sorry the last sentence should have read: They need weeding out because they are not all bad! Say It As It Is OK?
  • Score: 11

1:14pm Wed 16 Jul 14

stevedawson says...

Pretty grim figures however you view them.bill maloney is a person that has been a the forefront of uncovering this stain on our society.
Pretty grim figures however you view them.bill maloney is a person that has been a the forefront of uncovering this stain on our society. stevedawson
  • Score: 11

1:26pm Wed 16 Jul 14

Shaneblackdarkknight says...

well done Essex police keep it up ,, these sickos need to be locked up , disgusting human beings .
well done Essex police keep it up ,, these sickos need to be locked up , disgusting human beings . Shaneblackdarkknight
  • Score: 21

1:27pm Wed 16 Jul 14

Shaneblackdarkknight says...

Say It As It Is OK? wrote:
Say It As It Is OK? wrote:
It's worrying, but not surprising that some of those arrested include doctors, teachers, scout leaders, care workers, former police officers and other professionals with access to children. It's been a long term belief and well known that some of these people seek a profession that provides easy access to children. They need weeding out because they are to all bad.
Sorry the last sentence should have read:
They need weeding out because they are not all bad!
Not all bad ???? **** .
[quote][p][bold]Say It As It Is OK?[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Say It As It Is OK?[/bold] wrote: It's worrying, but not surprising that some of those arrested include doctors, teachers, scout leaders, care workers, former police officers and other professionals with access to children. It's been a long term belief and well known that some of these people seek a profession that provides easy access to children. They need weeding out because they are to all bad.[/p][/quote]Sorry the last sentence should have read: They need weeding out because they are not all bad![/p][/quote]Not all bad ???? **** . Shaneblackdarkknight
  • Score: -58

1:31pm Wed 16 Jul 14

SAndrewss says...

Shaneblackdarkknight wrote:
Say It As It Is OK? wrote:
Say It As It Is OK? wrote:
It's worrying, but not surprising that some of those arrested include doctors, teachers, scout leaders, care workers, former police officers and other professionals with access to children. It's been a long term belief and well known that some of these people seek a profession that provides easy access to children. They need weeding out because they are to all bad.
Sorry the last sentence should have read:
They need weeding out because they are not all bad!
Not all bad ???? **** .
I'm assuming he means that not all doctors, teachers, scout leaders, care workers, former police officers and other professionals with access to children are bad.
[quote][p][bold]Shaneblackdarkknight[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Say It As It Is OK?[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Say It As It Is OK?[/bold] wrote: It's worrying, but not surprising that some of those arrested include doctors, teachers, scout leaders, care workers, former police officers and other professionals with access to children. It's been a long term belief and well known that some of these people seek a profession that provides easy access to children. They need weeding out because they are to all bad.[/p][/quote]Sorry the last sentence should have read: They need weeding out because they are not all bad![/p][/quote]Not all bad ???? **** .[/p][/quote]I'm assuming he means that not all doctors, teachers, scout leaders, care workers, former police officers and other professionals with access to children are bad. SAndrewss
  • Score: 65

2:33pm Wed 16 Jul 14

Say It As It Is OK? says...

SAndrewss wrote:
Shaneblackdarkknight wrote:
Say It As It Is OK? wrote:
Say It As It Is OK? wrote:
It's worrying, but not surprising that some of those arrested include doctors, teachers, scout leaders, care workers, former police officers and other professionals with access to children. It's been a long term belief and well known that some of these people seek a profession that provides easy access to children. They need weeding out because they are to all bad.
Sorry the last sentence should have read:
They need weeding out because they are not all bad!
Not all bad ???? **** .
I'm assuming he means that not all doctors, teachers, scout leaders, care workers, former police officers and other professionals with access to children are bad.
Agreed, that is what I meant. Thanks.
[quote][p][bold]SAndrewss[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Shaneblackdarkknight[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Say It As It Is OK?[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Say It As It Is OK?[/bold] wrote: It's worrying, but not surprising that some of those arrested include doctors, teachers, scout leaders, care workers, former police officers and other professionals with access to children. It's been a long term belief and well known that some of these people seek a profession that provides easy access to children. They need weeding out because they are to all bad.[/p][/quote]Sorry the last sentence should have read: They need weeding out because they are not all bad![/p][/quote]Not all bad ???? **** .[/p][/quote]I'm assuming he means that not all doctors, teachers, scout leaders, care workers, former police officers and other professionals with access to children are bad.[/p][/quote]Agreed, that is what I meant. Thanks. Say It As It Is OK?
  • Score: 18

2:49pm Wed 16 Jul 14

Navajo wife says...

Great job and thanks to all who helped to get this filth off the streets.
Great job and thanks to all who helped to get this filth off the streets. Navajo wife
  • Score: 13

3:12pm Wed 16 Jul 14

Slim678 says...

Well done Essex Police. Arrest them, don't name them and then let them all out on bail. They are all sure to turn up on their bail date!!!!!
Well done Essex Police. Arrest them, don't name them and then let them all out on bail. They are all sure to turn up on their bail date!!!!! Slim678
  • Score: -4

4:36pm Wed 16 Jul 14

Kim Gandy says...

Shaneblackdarkknight wrote:
Say It As It Is OK? wrote:
Say It As It Is OK? wrote:
It's worrying, but not surprising that some of those arrested include doctors, teachers, scout leaders, care workers, former police officers and other professionals with access to children. It's been a long term belief and well known that some of these people seek a profession that provides easy access to children. They need weeding out because they are to all bad.
Sorry the last sentence should have read:
They need weeding out because they are not all bad!
Not all bad ???? **** .
Why are you numpties thumbs downing this comment?

The writer is questioning the previous comment that apparently states that paedophiles are not all bad.

The original writer later corrected his comment because it didn't read properly. Shane was questioning it that's all but you bozos NEVER read anything properly do you? In future READ what is actually being said. The four question marks and stars were a bit of a giveaway. For God's sake.

This is why you get so many things wrong because you don't read the FACTS and jump to too many conclusions.

Shane was questioning that statement - and quite rightly. I was shocked when I read it until I read the explanation further down.

To me, all paedos are filth and should be strung up regardless. Can't imagine what possesses this vermin to do what they do.

They should be removed from the gene pool.
[quote][p][bold]Shaneblackdarkknight[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Say It As It Is OK?[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Say It As It Is OK?[/bold] wrote: It's worrying, but not surprising that some of those arrested include doctors, teachers, scout leaders, care workers, former police officers and other professionals with access to children. It's been a long term belief and well known that some of these people seek a profession that provides easy access to children. They need weeding out because they are to all bad.[/p][/quote]Sorry the last sentence should have read: They need weeding out because they are not all bad![/p][/quote]Not all bad ???? **** .[/p][/quote]Why are you numpties thumbs downing this comment? The writer is questioning the previous comment that apparently states that paedophiles are not all bad. The original writer later corrected his comment because it didn't read properly. Shane was questioning it that's all but you bozos NEVER read anything properly do you? In future READ what is actually being said. The four question marks and stars were a bit of a giveaway. For God's sake. This is why you get so many things wrong because you don't read the FACTS and jump to too many conclusions. Shane was questioning that statement - and quite rightly. I was shocked when I read it until I read the explanation further down. To me, all paedos are filth and should be strung up regardless. Can't imagine what possesses this vermin to do what they do. They should be removed from the gene pool. Kim Gandy
  • Score: -46

6:07pm Wed 16 Jul 14

Jess Jephcott says...

Should be strung up regardless! What a statement that is; an incitement to murder. Talking about this to a Greek friend, I learned that, in his home area, they take such people up into the mountains and put a bullet in their head. Is that really the way things should be done? The fact is that 39 or so of the 660 or so that have been arrested were known to the police. So they are in the community already and the likelihood is that these perverts will get a ticking off and will be back in the community very quickly. I doubt very much whether any will go to jail. The thing is, we will never know who they are or where they live. Get used to it. They have their human rights - apparently. Watch over the little ones because they are innocents in all this.
Should be strung up regardless! What a statement that is; an incitement to murder. Talking about this to a Greek friend, I learned that, in his home area, they take such people up into the mountains and put a bullet in their head. Is that really the way things should be done? The fact is that 39 or so of the 660 or so that have been arrested were known to the police. So they are in the community already and the likelihood is that these perverts will get a ticking off and will be back in the community very quickly. I doubt very much whether any will go to jail. The thing is, we will never know who they are or where they live. Get used to it. They have their human rights - apparently. Watch over the little ones because they are innocents in all this. Jess Jephcott
  • Score: 1

6:17pm Wed 16 Jul 14

Shaneblackdarkknight says...

Say It As It Is OK? wrote:
SAndrewss wrote:
Shaneblackdarkknight wrote:
Say It As It Is OK? wrote:
Say It As It Is OK? wrote:
It's worrying, but not surprising that some of those arrested include doctors, teachers, scout leaders, care workers, former police officers and other professionals with access to children. It's been a long term belief and well known that some of these people seek a profession that provides easy access to children. They need weeding out because they are to all bad.
Sorry the last sentence should have read:
They need weeding out because they are not all bad!
Not all bad ???? **** .
I'm assuming he means that not all doctors, teachers, scout leaders, care workers, former police officers and other professionals with access to children are bad.
Agreed, that is what I meant. Thanks.
Sorry man ......
[quote][p][bold]Say It As It Is OK?[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]SAndrewss[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Shaneblackdarkknight[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Say It As It Is OK?[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Say It As It Is OK?[/bold] wrote: It's worrying, but not surprising that some of those arrested include doctors, teachers, scout leaders, care workers, former police officers and other professionals with access to children. It's been a long term belief and well known that some of these people seek a profession that provides easy access to children. They need weeding out because they are to all bad.[/p][/quote]Sorry the last sentence should have read: They need weeding out because they are not all bad![/p][/quote]Not all bad ???? **** .[/p][/quote]I'm assuming he means that not all doctors, teachers, scout leaders, care workers, former police officers and other professionals with access to children are bad.[/p][/quote]Agreed, that is what I meant. Thanks.[/p][/quote]Sorry man ...... Shaneblackdarkknight
  • Score: 18

6:49pm Wed 16 Jul 14

andyman1971 says...

supermadmax wrote:
Scout Leaders and police - the same old usual suspects.
What a foul disgusting thing to say. There are also many many decent scout leaders and police officers. Surprisingly enough it was police who mounted this operation to protect children.Your comment almost makes you as bad. Go get a job and make yourself useful rather than tarring every one with the same brush... you loser !
[quote][p][bold]supermadmax[/bold] wrote: Scout Leaders and police - the same old usual suspects.[/p][/quote]What a foul disgusting thing to say. There are also many many decent scout leaders and police officers. Surprisingly enough it was police who mounted this operation to protect children.Your comment almost makes you as bad. Go get a job and make yourself useful rather than tarring every one with the same brush... you loser ! andyman1971
  • Score: 33

7:52pm Wed 16 Jul 14

jayman says...

Before I am massively misunderstood or misquoted I would like to very clearly state that child protection should be at the very top of the police agenda and that I am in no way defending or supporting the actions of these sub humans and that i believe that justice should be swift and without leniency for such scum.

paedophile activity is as old as the hills and is/has always been centred and focused around large institutions of power or child contact. That said it can also be within the family home or within personal connections of trust that enable access to children.

what deeply concerns me here is that this paedophile police bust comes at the same time that a troubled and controversially managed investigation is being set up to investigate historic paedophile abuse within the seat of power. Would it be so deeply cynical of me to suggest that this information (660 arrested) has been know by the police for some time and that it has been pushed forward from high above in order to defuse and distract the public mindset that was/is or is going to soon be, focused on Westminster?

you decide.
Before I am massively misunderstood or misquoted I would like to very clearly state that child protection should be at the very top of the police agenda and that I am in no way defending or supporting the actions of these sub humans and that i believe that justice should be swift and without leniency for such scum. paedophile activity is as old as the hills and is/has always been centred and focused around large institutions of power or child contact. That said it can also be within the family home or within personal connections of trust that enable access to children. what deeply concerns me here is that this paedophile police bust comes at the same time that a troubled and controversially managed investigation is being set up to investigate historic paedophile abuse within the seat of power. Would it be so deeply cynical of me to suggest that this information (660 arrested) has been know by the police for some time and that it has been pushed forward from high above in order to defuse and distract the public mindset that was/is or is going to soon be, focused on Westminster? you decide. jayman
  • Score: 9

8:06pm Wed 16 Jul 14

andyman1971 says...

jayman wrote:
Before I am massively misunderstood or misquoted I would like to very clearly state that child protection should be at the very top of the police agenda and that I am in no way defending or supporting the actions of these sub humans and that i believe that justice should be swift and without leniency for such scum.

paedophile activity is as old as the hills and is/has always been centred and focused around large institutions of power or child contact. That said it can also be within the family home or within personal connections of trust that enable access to children.

what deeply concerns me here is that this paedophile police bust comes at the same time that a troubled and controversially managed investigation is being set up to investigate historic paedophile abuse within the seat of power. Would it be so deeply cynical of me to suggest that this information (660 arrested) has been know by the police for some time and that it has been pushed forward from high above in order to defuse and distract the public mindset that was/is or is going to soon be, focused on Westminster?

you decide.
Not at all.. an operation can't simply be pushed forward at short notice. An operation like this is many many months in planning. It's purely a coincidence. Even if it was changed at short notice.. good on them, more evil scum off or streets. The other enquiry is too controversial to be messed with. Transparency will be the main focus of this operation with no stone un turned. Tougher sentences and castration would solve the problem. This crime has not increased its thankfully due to technology that's suspects are getting caught unfortunately the same technology they use in the first place to share the vile images. Well done to the police and all concerned, your doing a great job. Thank you x
[quote][p][bold]jayman[/bold] wrote: Before I am massively misunderstood or misquoted I would like to very clearly state that child protection should be at the very top of the police agenda and that I am in no way defending or supporting the actions of these sub humans and that i believe that justice should be swift and without leniency for such scum. paedophile activity is as old as the hills and is/has always been centred and focused around large institutions of power or child contact. That said it can also be within the family home or within personal connections of trust that enable access to children. what deeply concerns me here is that this paedophile police bust comes at the same time that a troubled and controversially managed investigation is being set up to investigate historic paedophile abuse within the seat of power. Would it be so deeply cynical of me to suggest that this information (660 arrested) has been know by the police for some time and that it has been pushed forward from high above in order to defuse and distract the public mindset that was/is or is going to soon be, focused on Westminster? you decide.[/p][/quote]Not at all.. an operation can't simply be pushed forward at short notice. An operation like this is many many months in planning. It's purely a coincidence. Even if it was changed at short notice.. good on them, more evil scum off or streets. The other enquiry is too controversial to be messed with. Transparency will be the main focus of this operation with no stone un turned. Tougher sentences and castration would solve the problem. This crime has not increased its thankfully due to technology that's suspects are getting caught unfortunately the same technology they use in the first place to share the vile images. Well done to the police and all concerned, your doing a great job. Thank you x andyman1971
  • Score: 8

8:17pm Wed 16 Jul 14

pussycats says...

Have just read all your comments......I thank the police and media for working intensively and for their determination to get these sick, weird "professionals" prosecuted, and imprisoned for ever..But that is just a low percentage of the real problem. It's not just "professionals" that indulge in such.....I am totally in favour of personal computers and laptops being scrutinized re investigations and complaints to child and young people's sexual and physical abuse...whether by photos, chat or personal contact.
Have just read all your comments......I thank the police and media for working intensively and for their determination to get these sick, weird "professionals" prosecuted, and imprisoned for ever..But that is just a low percentage of the real problem. It's not just "professionals" that indulge in such.....I am totally in favour of personal computers and laptops being scrutinized re investigations and complaints to child and young people's sexual and physical abuse...whether by photos, chat or personal contact. pussycats
  • Score: 7

8:42pm Wed 16 Jul 14

jayman says...

andyman1971 wrote:
jayman wrote:
Before I am massively misunderstood or misquoted I would like to very clearly state that child protection should be at the very top of the police agenda and that I am in no way defending or supporting the actions of these sub humans and that i believe that justice should be swift and without leniency for such scum.

paedophile activity is as old as the hills and is/has always been centred and focused around large institutions of power or child contact. That said it can also be within the family home or within personal connections of trust that enable access to children.

what deeply concerns me here is that this paedophile police bust comes at the same time that a troubled and controversially managed investigation is being set up to investigate historic paedophile abuse within the seat of power. Would it be so deeply cynical of me to suggest that this information (660 arrested) has been know by the police for some time and that it has been pushed forward from high above in order to defuse and distract the public mindset that was/is or is going to soon be, focused on Westminster?

you decide.
Not at all.. an operation can't simply be pushed forward at short notice. An operation like this is many many months in planning. It's purely a coincidence. Even if it was changed at short notice.. good on them, more evil scum off or streets. The other enquiry is too controversial to be messed with. Transparency will be the main focus of this operation with no stone un turned. Tougher sentences and castration would solve the problem. This crime has not increased its thankfully due to technology that's suspects are getting caught unfortunately the same technology they use in the first place to share the vile images. Well done to the police and all concerned, your doing a great job. Thank you x
there are a few things that i disagree with

"an operation can't simply be pushed forward at short notice"

In a digital age, an individuals internet history is ready for court presentation. even in its raw form. evidence is ready. all the police need to do is seize the computer and interview the suspect. A whole prosecution package is ready in a matter of days.

"The other enquiry is too controversial to be messed with"

lady, butler-sloss resigned due to a family connection. Her brother was attorney general in the 80's. she was politically selected and ultimately found to be potentially bias.

in a separate yet interesting story GCHQ et al have been found to be dabbling in political domestic discourse yet again. driving public opinion?

http://www.bbc.co.uk
/news/technology-283
06819.

alas, I do not trust the establishment.
[quote][p][bold]andyman1971[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]jayman[/bold] wrote: Before I am massively misunderstood or misquoted I would like to very clearly state that child protection should be at the very top of the police agenda and that I am in no way defending or supporting the actions of these sub humans and that i believe that justice should be swift and without leniency for such scum. paedophile activity is as old as the hills and is/has always been centred and focused around large institutions of power or child contact. That said it can also be within the family home or within personal connections of trust that enable access to children. what deeply concerns me here is that this paedophile police bust comes at the same time that a troubled and controversially managed investigation is being set up to investigate historic paedophile abuse within the seat of power. Would it be so deeply cynical of me to suggest that this information (660 arrested) has been know by the police for some time and that it has been pushed forward from high above in order to defuse and distract the public mindset that was/is or is going to soon be, focused on Westminster? you decide.[/p][/quote]Not at all.. an operation can't simply be pushed forward at short notice. An operation like this is many many months in planning. It's purely a coincidence. Even if it was changed at short notice.. good on them, more evil scum off or streets. The other enquiry is too controversial to be messed with. Transparency will be the main focus of this operation with no stone un turned. Tougher sentences and castration would solve the problem. This crime has not increased its thankfully due to technology that's suspects are getting caught unfortunately the same technology they use in the first place to share the vile images. Well done to the police and all concerned, your doing a great job. Thank you x[/p][/quote]there are a few things that i disagree with "an operation can't simply be pushed forward at short notice" In a digital age, an individuals internet history is ready for court presentation. even in its raw form. evidence is ready. all the police need to do is seize the computer and interview the suspect. A whole prosecution package is ready in a matter of days. "The other enquiry is too controversial to be messed with" lady, butler-sloss resigned due to a family connection. Her brother was attorney general in the 80's. she was politically selected and ultimately found to be potentially bias. in a separate yet interesting story GCHQ et al have been found to be dabbling in political domestic discourse yet again. driving public opinion? http://www.bbc.co.uk /news/technology-283 06819. alas, I do not trust the establishment. jayman
  • Score: 2

8:46pm Wed 16 Jul 14

Suffolkcommuter says...

This is course good news and is my area of work, (although I cannot go into specifics). However, sentencing laws clearly need to change and I hate to disappoint you all, but the majority of these people (if convicted) will not be off the streets, and neither will they be sent to prison!!

As first offences - either downloading / distributing indecent images of children will likely see them fined / slapped on the wrist! I have seen this happen on many occasions with people found with hundreds / thousands of images and more.

If found guilty - I imagine they will receive either a SOPO (sexual offences prevention order) and the person will be placed on the sex offenders register (limiting their access to children in whatever is deemed fit by the courts), but this all depends on the nature of the images which are categorised by the 'copine scale'. Google this if you wish.

The harm caused to children by this behaviour as equally harmful as actual sexual abuse (well of course children will have been abused for the pictures to be taken anyway), but we are along way from perpetrators displaying paedophile activity on the net, receiving actual prison sentences such as Saville and all the rest.
This is course good news and is my area of work, (although I cannot go into specifics). However, sentencing laws clearly need to change and I hate to disappoint you all, but the majority of these people (if convicted) will not be off the streets, and neither will they be sent to prison!! As first offences - either downloading / distributing indecent images of children will likely see them fined / slapped on the wrist! I have seen this happen on many occasions with people found with hundreds / thousands of images and more. If found guilty - I imagine they will receive either a SOPO (sexual offences prevention order) and the person will be placed on the sex offenders register (limiting their access to children in whatever is deemed fit by the courts), but this all depends on the nature of the images which are categorised by the 'copine scale'. Google this if you wish. The harm caused to children by this behaviour as equally harmful as actual sexual abuse (well of course children will have been abused for the pictures to be taken anyway), but we are along way from perpetrators displaying paedophile activity on the net, receiving actual prison sentences such as Saville and all the rest. Suffolkcommuter
  • Score: 5

8:57pm Wed 16 Jul 14

andyman1971 says...

pussycats wrote:
Have just read all your comments......I thank the police and media for working intensively and for their determination to get these sick, weird "professionals" prosecuted, and imprisoned for ever..But that is just a low percentage of the real problem. It's not just "professionals" that indulge in such.....I am totally in favour of personal computers and laptops being scrutinized re investigations and complaints to child and young people's sexual and physical abuse...whether by photos, chat or personal contact.
I totally agree.. I have no problem with the government having access to my Google logins... I have nothing to hide at all. Everything I look at is totally legal, I have nothing to hide what do ever that I would be ashamed of., this can't be said for the scum, professionals or not.
[quote][p][bold]pussycats[/bold] wrote: Have just read all your comments......I thank the police and media for working intensively and for their determination to get these sick, weird "professionals" prosecuted, and imprisoned for ever..But that is just a low percentage of the real problem. It's not just "professionals" that indulge in such.....I am totally in favour of personal computers and laptops being scrutinized re investigations and complaints to child and young people's sexual and physical abuse...whether by photos, chat or personal contact.[/p][/quote]I totally agree.. I have no problem with the government having access to my Google logins... I have nothing to hide at all. Everything I look at is totally legal, I have nothing to hide what do ever that I would be ashamed of., this can't be said for the scum, professionals or not. andyman1971
  • Score: 8

9:02pm Wed 16 Jul 14

andyman1971 says...

Suffolkcommuter wrote:
This is course good news and is my area of work, (although I cannot go into specifics). However, sentencing laws clearly need to change and I hate to disappoint you all, but the majority of these people (if convicted) will not be off the streets, and neither will they be sent to prison!!

As first offences - either downloading / distributing indecent images of children will likely see them fined / slapped on the wrist! I have seen this happen on many occasions with people found with hundreds / thousands of images and more.

If found guilty - I imagine they will receive either a SOPO (sexual offences prevention order) and the person will be placed on the sex offenders register (limiting their access to children in whatever is deemed fit by the courts), but this all depends on the nature of the images which are categorised by the 'copine scale'. Google this if you wish.

The harm caused to children by this behaviour as equally harmful as actual sexual abuse (well of course children will have been abused for the pictures to be taken anyway), but we are along way from perpetrators displaying paedophile activity on the net, receiving actual prison sentences such as Saville and all the rest.
Very interesting information. Thank you. From what I read and how it's worded clearly a professional in the legal sector of society. It's a shame we can't put them away for a first offence.
[quote][p][bold]Suffolkcommuter[/bold] wrote: This is course good news and is my area of work, (although I cannot go into specifics). However, sentencing laws clearly need to change and I hate to disappoint you all, but the majority of these people (if convicted) will not be off the streets, and neither will they be sent to prison!! As first offences - either downloading / distributing indecent images of children will likely see them fined / slapped on the wrist! I have seen this happen on many occasions with people found with hundreds / thousands of images and more. If found guilty - I imagine they will receive either a SOPO (sexual offences prevention order) and the person will be placed on the sex offenders register (limiting their access to children in whatever is deemed fit by the courts), but this all depends on the nature of the images which are categorised by the 'copine scale'. Google this if you wish. The harm caused to children by this behaviour as equally harmful as actual sexual abuse (well of course children will have been abused for the pictures to be taken anyway), but we are along way from perpetrators displaying paedophile activity on the net, receiving actual prison sentences such as Saville and all the rest.[/p][/quote]Very interesting information. Thank you. From what I read and how it's worded clearly a professional in the legal sector of society. It's a shame we can't put them away for a first offence. andyman1971
  • Score: 5

9:10pm Wed 16 Jul 14

andyman1971 says...

jayman wrote:
andyman1971 wrote:
jayman wrote:
Before I am massively misunderstood or misquoted I would like to very clearly state that child protection should be at the very top of the police agenda and that I am in no way defending or supporting the actions of these sub humans and that i believe that justice should be swift and without leniency for such scum.

paedophile activity is as old as the hills and is/has always been centred and focused around large institutions of power or child contact. That said it can also be within the family home or within personal connections of trust that enable access to children.

what deeply concerns me here is that this paedophile police bust comes at the same time that a troubled and controversially managed investigation is being set up to investigate historic paedophile abuse within the seat of power. Would it be so deeply cynical of me to suggest that this information (660 arrested) has been know by the police for some time and that it has been pushed forward from high above in order to defuse and distract the public mindset that was/is or is going to soon be, focused on Westminster?

you decide.
Not at all.. an operation can't simply be pushed forward at short notice. An operation like this is many many months in planning. It's purely a coincidence. Even if it was changed at short notice.. good on them, more evil scum off or streets. The other enquiry is too controversial to be messed with. Transparency will be the main focus of this operation with no stone un turned. Tougher sentences and castration would solve the problem. This crime has not increased its thankfully due to technology that's suspects are getting caught unfortunately the same technology they use in the first place to share the vile images. Well done to the police and all concerned, your doing a great job. Thank you x
there are a few things that i disagree with

"an operation can't simply be pushed forward at short notice"

In a digital age, an individuals internet history is ready for court presentation. even in its raw form. evidence is ready. all the police need to do is seize the computer and interview the suspect. A whole prosecution package is ready in a matter of days.

"The other enquiry is too controversial to be messed with"

lady, butler-sloss resigned due to a family connection. Her brother was attorney general in the 80's. she was politically selected and ultimately found to be potentially bias.

in a separate yet interesting story GCHQ et al have been found to be dabbling in political domestic discourse yet again. driving public opinion?

http://www.bbc.co.uk

/news/technology-283

06819.

alas, I do not trust the establishment.
Without going into my profession either... preparing files and evidence of this magnitude for courts... the crown courts is a mammoth task. This is not a simply job. Much conversation would of been had with expert lawyer's in this field advising what evidence would be required. There are many defences for having these sorts of images on a computer and all these defences need to be negated for court, not a simply process. Then you have a problem if the computer or chip/ file is password locked. The computer physically needs to be stripped down and each and every chip that has a thumb print of the images needs to be found. This can take many weeks, during this time the DP remains on police bail and NOT charged.
[quote][p][bold]jayman[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]andyman1971[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]jayman[/bold] wrote: Before I am massively misunderstood or misquoted I would like to very clearly state that child protection should be at the very top of the police agenda and that I am in no way defending or supporting the actions of these sub humans and that i believe that justice should be swift and without leniency for such scum. paedophile activity is as old as the hills and is/has always been centred and focused around large institutions of power or child contact. That said it can also be within the family home or within personal connections of trust that enable access to children. what deeply concerns me here is that this paedophile police bust comes at the same time that a troubled and controversially managed investigation is being set up to investigate historic paedophile abuse within the seat of power. Would it be so deeply cynical of me to suggest that this information (660 arrested) has been know by the police for some time and that it has been pushed forward from high above in order to defuse and distract the public mindset that was/is or is going to soon be, focused on Westminster? you decide.[/p][/quote]Not at all.. an operation can't simply be pushed forward at short notice. An operation like this is many many months in planning. It's purely a coincidence. Even if it was changed at short notice.. good on them, more evil scum off or streets. The other enquiry is too controversial to be messed with. Transparency will be the main focus of this operation with no stone un turned. Tougher sentences and castration would solve the problem. This crime has not increased its thankfully due to technology that's suspects are getting caught unfortunately the same technology they use in the first place to share the vile images. Well done to the police and all concerned, your doing a great job. Thank you x[/p][/quote]there are a few things that i disagree with "an operation can't simply be pushed forward at short notice" In a digital age, an individuals internet history is ready for court presentation. even in its raw form. evidence is ready. all the police need to do is seize the computer and interview the suspect. A whole prosecution package is ready in a matter of days. "The other enquiry is too controversial to be messed with" lady, butler-sloss resigned due to a family connection. Her brother was attorney general in the 80's. she was politically selected and ultimately found to be potentially bias. in a separate yet interesting story GCHQ et al have been found to be dabbling in political domestic discourse yet again. driving public opinion? http://www.bbc.co.uk /news/technology-283 06819. alas, I do not trust the establishment.[/p][/quote]Without going into my profession either... preparing files and evidence of this magnitude for courts... the crown courts is a mammoth task. This is not a simply job. Much conversation would of been had with expert lawyer's in this field advising what evidence would be required. There are many defences for having these sorts of images on a computer and all these defences need to be negated for court, not a simply process. Then you have a problem if the computer or chip/ file is password locked. The computer physically needs to be stripped down and each and every chip that has a thumb print of the images needs to be found. This can take many weeks, during this time the DP remains on police bail and NOT charged. andyman1971
  • Score: 2

9:25pm Wed 16 Jul 14

Suffolkcommuter says...

andyman1971 wrote:
jayman wrote:
andyman1971 wrote:
jayman wrote:
Before I am massively misunderstood or misquoted I would like to very clearly state that child protection should be at the very top of the police agenda and that I am in no way defending or supporting the actions of these sub humans and that i believe that justice should be swift and without leniency for such scum.

paedophile activity is as old as the hills and is/has always been centred and focused around large institutions of power or child contact. That said it can also be within the family home or within personal connections of trust that enable access to children.

what deeply concerns me here is that this paedophile police bust comes at the same time that a troubled and controversially managed investigation is being set up to investigate historic paedophile abuse within the seat of power. Would it be so deeply cynical of me to suggest that this information (660 arrested) has been know by the police for some time and that it has been pushed forward from high above in order to defuse and distract the public mindset that was/is or is going to soon be, focused on Westminster?

you decide.
Not at all.. an operation can't simply be pushed forward at short notice. An operation like this is many many months in planning. It's purely a coincidence. Even if it was changed at short notice.. good on them, more evil scum off or streets. The other enquiry is too controversial to be messed with. Transparency will be the main focus of this operation with no stone un turned. Tougher sentences and castration would solve the problem. This crime has not increased its thankfully due to technology that's suspects are getting caught unfortunately the same technology they use in the first place to share the vile images. Well done to the police and all concerned, your doing a great job. Thank you x
there are a few things that i disagree with

"an operation can't simply be pushed forward at short notice"

In a digital age, an individuals internet history is ready for court presentation. even in its raw form. evidence is ready. all the police need to do is seize the computer and interview the suspect. A whole prosecution package is ready in a matter of days.

"The other enquiry is too controversial to be messed with"

lady, butler-sloss resigned due to a family connection. Her brother was attorney general in the 80's. she was politically selected and ultimately found to be potentially bias.

in a separate yet interesting story GCHQ et al have been found to be dabbling in political domestic discourse yet again. driving public opinion?

http://www.bbc.co.uk


/news/technology-283


06819.

alas, I do not trust the establishment.
Without going into my profession either... preparing files and evidence of this magnitude for courts... the crown courts is a mammoth task. This is not a simply job. Much conversation would of been had with expert lawyer's in this field advising what evidence would be required. There are many defences for having these sorts of images on a computer and all these defences need to be negated for court, not a simply process. Then you have a problem if the computer or chip/ file is password locked. The computer physically needs to be stripped down and each and every chip that has a thumb print of the images needs to be found. This can take many weeks, during this time the DP remains on police bail and NOT charged.
Agreed - and bailed. Although normally away from the family home (and restrictions with no unsupervised access to children).
[quote][p][bold]andyman1971[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]jayman[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]andyman1971[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]jayman[/bold] wrote: Before I am massively misunderstood or misquoted I would like to very clearly state that child protection should be at the very top of the police agenda and that I am in no way defending or supporting the actions of these sub humans and that i believe that justice should be swift and without leniency for such scum. paedophile activity is as old as the hills and is/has always been centred and focused around large institutions of power or child contact. That said it can also be within the family home or within personal connections of trust that enable access to children. what deeply concerns me here is that this paedophile police bust comes at the same time that a troubled and controversially managed investigation is being set up to investigate historic paedophile abuse within the seat of power. Would it be so deeply cynical of me to suggest that this information (660 arrested) has been know by the police for some time and that it has been pushed forward from high above in order to defuse and distract the public mindset that was/is or is going to soon be, focused on Westminster? you decide.[/p][/quote]Not at all.. an operation can't simply be pushed forward at short notice. An operation like this is many many months in planning. It's purely a coincidence. Even if it was changed at short notice.. good on them, more evil scum off or streets. The other enquiry is too controversial to be messed with. Transparency will be the main focus of this operation with no stone un turned. Tougher sentences and castration would solve the problem. This crime has not increased its thankfully due to technology that's suspects are getting caught unfortunately the same technology they use in the first place to share the vile images. Well done to the police and all concerned, your doing a great job. Thank you x[/p][/quote]there are a few things that i disagree with "an operation can't simply be pushed forward at short notice" In a digital age, an individuals internet history is ready for court presentation. even in its raw form. evidence is ready. all the police need to do is seize the computer and interview the suspect. A whole prosecution package is ready in a matter of days. "The other enquiry is too controversial to be messed with" lady, butler-sloss resigned due to a family connection. Her brother was attorney general in the 80's. she was politically selected and ultimately found to be potentially bias. in a separate yet interesting story GCHQ et al have been found to be dabbling in political domestic discourse yet again. driving public opinion? http://www.bbc.co.uk /news/technology-283 06819. alas, I do not trust the establishment.[/p][/quote]Without going into my profession either... preparing files and evidence of this magnitude for courts... the crown courts is a mammoth task. This is not a simply job. Much conversation would of been had with expert lawyer's in this field advising what evidence would be required. There are many defences for having these sorts of images on a computer and all these defences need to be negated for court, not a simply process. Then you have a problem if the computer or chip/ file is password locked. The computer physically needs to be stripped down and each and every chip that has a thumb print of the images needs to be found. This can take many weeks, during this time the DP remains on police bail and NOT charged.[/p][/quote]Agreed - and bailed. Although normally away from the family home (and restrictions with no unsupervised access to children). Suffolkcommuter
  • Score: 2

9:27pm Wed 16 Jul 14

jayman says...

andyman1971 wrote:
jayman wrote:
andyman1971 wrote:
jayman wrote:
Before I am massively misunderstood or misquoted I would like to very clearly state that child protection should be at the very top of the police agenda and that I am in no way defending or supporting the actions of these sub humans and that i believe that justice should be swift and without leniency for such scum.

paedophile activity is as old as the hills and is/has always been centred and focused around large institutions of power or child contact. That said it can also be within the family home or within personal connections of trust that enable access to children.

what deeply concerns me here is that this paedophile police bust comes at the same time that a troubled and controversially managed investigation is being set up to investigate historic paedophile abuse within the seat of power. Would it be so deeply cynical of me to suggest that this information (660 arrested) has been know by the police for some time and that it has been pushed forward from high above in order to defuse and distract the public mindset that was/is or is going to soon be, focused on Westminster?

you decide.
Not at all.. an operation can't simply be pushed forward at short notice. An operation like this is many many months in planning. It's purely a coincidence. Even if it was changed at short notice.. good on them, more evil scum off or streets. The other enquiry is too controversial to be messed with. Transparency will be the main focus of this operation with no stone un turned. Tougher sentences and castration would solve the problem. This crime has not increased its thankfully due to technology that's suspects are getting caught unfortunately the same technology they use in the first place to share the vile images. Well done to the police and all concerned, your doing a great job. Thank you x
there are a few things that i disagree with

"an operation can't simply be pushed forward at short notice"

In a digital age, an individuals internet history is ready for court presentation. even in its raw form. evidence is ready. all the police need to do is seize the computer and interview the suspect. A whole prosecution package is ready in a matter of days.

"The other enquiry is too controversial to be messed with"

lady, butler-sloss resigned due to a family connection. Her brother was attorney general in the 80's. she was politically selected and ultimately found to be potentially bias.

in a separate yet interesting story GCHQ et al have been found to be dabbling in political domestic discourse yet again. driving public opinion?

http://www.bbc.co.uk


/news/technology-283


06819.

alas, I do not trust the establishment.
Without going into my profession either... preparing files and evidence of this magnitude for courts... the crown courts is a mammoth task. This is not a simply job. Much conversation would of been had with expert lawyer's in this field advising what evidence would be required. There are many defences for having these sorts of images on a computer and all these defences need to be negated for court, not a simply process. Then you have a problem if the computer or chip/ file is password locked. The computer physically needs to be stripped down and each and every chip that has a thumb print of the images needs to be found. This can take many weeks, during this time the DP remains on police bail and NOT charged.
common 128-bit encryption is easy to crack. The evidence collecting has just began. the first batch of cases will be before the courts in a matter of days/weeks. the story on this in the national press mentioned 'dark net' I suspect more IT resource and polished evidence will be available to the police as a direct result. I also suspect that the National Crime Agency where handed a vast quantity of information from other agencies whos job it is to monitor such traffic.
[quote][p][bold]andyman1971[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]jayman[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]andyman1971[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]jayman[/bold] wrote: Before I am massively misunderstood or misquoted I would like to very clearly state that child protection should be at the very top of the police agenda and that I am in no way defending or supporting the actions of these sub humans and that i believe that justice should be swift and without leniency for such scum. paedophile activity is as old as the hills and is/has always been centred and focused around large institutions of power or child contact. That said it can also be within the family home or within personal connections of trust that enable access to children. what deeply concerns me here is that this paedophile police bust comes at the same time that a troubled and controversially managed investigation is being set up to investigate historic paedophile abuse within the seat of power. Would it be so deeply cynical of me to suggest that this information (660 arrested) has been know by the police for some time and that it has been pushed forward from high above in order to defuse and distract the public mindset that was/is or is going to soon be, focused on Westminster? you decide.[/p][/quote]Not at all.. an operation can't simply be pushed forward at short notice. An operation like this is many many months in planning. It's purely a coincidence. Even if it was changed at short notice.. good on them, more evil scum off or streets. The other enquiry is too controversial to be messed with. Transparency will be the main focus of this operation with no stone un turned. Tougher sentences and castration would solve the problem. This crime has not increased its thankfully due to technology that's suspects are getting caught unfortunately the same technology they use in the first place to share the vile images. Well done to the police and all concerned, your doing a great job. Thank you x[/p][/quote]there are a few things that i disagree with "an operation can't simply be pushed forward at short notice" In a digital age, an individuals internet history is ready for court presentation. even in its raw form. evidence is ready. all the police need to do is seize the computer and interview the suspect. A whole prosecution package is ready in a matter of days. "The other enquiry is too controversial to be messed with" lady, butler-sloss resigned due to a family connection. Her brother was attorney general in the 80's. she was politically selected and ultimately found to be potentially bias. in a separate yet interesting story GCHQ et al have been found to be dabbling in political domestic discourse yet again. driving public opinion? http://www.bbc.co.uk /news/technology-283 06819. alas, I do not trust the establishment.[/p][/quote]Without going into my profession either... preparing files and evidence of this magnitude for courts... the crown courts is a mammoth task. This is not a simply job. Much conversation would of been had with expert lawyer's in this field advising what evidence would be required. There are many defences for having these sorts of images on a computer and all these defences need to be negated for court, not a simply process. Then you have a problem if the computer or chip/ file is password locked. The computer physically needs to be stripped down and each and every chip that has a thumb print of the images needs to be found. This can take many weeks, during this time the DP remains on police bail and NOT charged.[/p][/quote]common 128-bit encryption is easy to crack. The evidence collecting has just began. the first batch of cases will be before the courts in a matter of days/weeks. the story on this in the national press mentioned 'dark net' I suspect more IT resource and polished evidence will be available to the police as a direct result. I also suspect that the National Crime Agency where handed a vast quantity of information from other agencies whos job it is to monitor such traffic. jayman
  • Score: 1

10:10pm Wed 16 Jul 14

jayman says...

jayman wrote:
andyman1971 wrote:
jayman wrote:
andyman1971 wrote:
jayman wrote:
Before I am massively misunderstood or misquoted I would like to very clearly state that child protection should be at the very top of the police agenda and that I am in no way defending or supporting the actions of these sub humans and that i believe that justice should be swift and without leniency for such scum.

paedophile activity is as old as the hills and is/has always been centred and focused around large institutions of power or child contact. That said it can also be within the family home or within personal connections of trust that enable access to children.

what deeply concerns me here is that this paedophile police bust comes at the same time that a troubled and controversially managed investigation is being set up to investigate historic paedophile abuse within the seat of power. Would it be so deeply cynical of me to suggest that this information (660 arrested) has been know by the police for some time and that it has been pushed forward from high above in order to defuse and distract the public mindset that was/is or is going to soon be, focused on Westminster?

you decide.
Not at all.. an operation can't simply be pushed forward at short notice. An operation like this is many many months in planning. It's purely a coincidence. Even if it was changed at short notice.. good on them, more evil scum off or streets. The other enquiry is too controversial to be messed with. Transparency will be the main focus of this operation with no stone un turned. Tougher sentences and castration would solve the problem. This crime has not increased its thankfully due to technology that's suspects are getting caught unfortunately the same technology they use in the first place to share the vile images. Well done to the police and all concerned, your doing a great job. Thank you x
there are a few things that i disagree with

"an operation can't simply be pushed forward at short notice"

In a digital age, an individuals internet history is ready for court presentation. even in its raw form. evidence is ready. all the police need to do is seize the computer and interview the suspect. A whole prosecution package is ready in a matter of days.

"The other enquiry is too controversial to be messed with"

lady, butler-sloss resigned due to a family connection. Her brother was attorney general in the 80's. she was politically selected and ultimately found to be potentially bias.

in a separate yet interesting story GCHQ et al have been found to be dabbling in political domestic discourse yet again. driving public opinion?

http://www.bbc.co.uk



/news/technology-283



06819.

alas, I do not trust the establishment.
Without going into my profession either... preparing files and evidence of this magnitude for courts... the crown courts is a mammoth task. This is not a simply job. Much conversation would of been had with expert lawyer's in this field advising what evidence would be required. There are many defences for having these sorts of images on a computer and all these defences need to be negated for court, not a simply process. Then you have a problem if the computer or chip/ file is password locked. The computer physically needs to be stripped down and each and every chip that has a thumb print of the images needs to be found. This can take many weeks, during this time the DP remains on police bail and NOT charged.
common 128-bit encryption is easy to crack. The evidence collecting has just began. the first batch of cases will be before the courts in a matter of days/weeks. the story on this in the national press mentioned 'dark net' I suspect more IT resource and polished evidence will be available to the police as a direct result. I also suspect that the National Crime Agency where handed a vast quantity of information from other agencies whos job it is to monitor such traffic.
this information was passed on with a specific brief though. I'm not saying that the evidence was fabricated, I'm sure that the suspects are as guilty as sin. but the time and presentation of this story is very much 'for media consumption' with two politically charged underlying motives.

1) The historic parliamentary child abuse inquiry
2) The data communication, emergency legislation passed through parliament.

David Cameron was warmed up for reaction, political and agency pundits where stood by, the arrests where made. good result for the police and child protection but highly loaded for public opinion nudging.
[quote][p][bold]jayman[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]andyman1971[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]jayman[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]andyman1971[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]jayman[/bold] wrote: Before I am massively misunderstood or misquoted I would like to very clearly state that child protection should be at the very top of the police agenda and that I am in no way defending or supporting the actions of these sub humans and that i believe that justice should be swift and without leniency for such scum. paedophile activity is as old as the hills and is/has always been centred and focused around large institutions of power or child contact. That said it can also be within the family home or within personal connections of trust that enable access to children. what deeply concerns me here is that this paedophile police bust comes at the same time that a troubled and controversially managed investigation is being set up to investigate historic paedophile abuse within the seat of power. Would it be so deeply cynical of me to suggest that this information (660 arrested) has been know by the police for some time and that it has been pushed forward from high above in order to defuse and distract the public mindset that was/is or is going to soon be, focused on Westminster? you decide.[/p][/quote]Not at all.. an operation can't simply be pushed forward at short notice. An operation like this is many many months in planning. It's purely a coincidence. Even if it was changed at short notice.. good on them, more evil scum off or streets. The other enquiry is too controversial to be messed with. Transparency will be the main focus of this operation with no stone un turned. Tougher sentences and castration would solve the problem. This crime has not increased its thankfully due to technology that's suspects are getting caught unfortunately the same technology they use in the first place to share the vile images. Well done to the police and all concerned, your doing a great job. Thank you x[/p][/quote]there are a few things that i disagree with "an operation can't simply be pushed forward at short notice" In a digital age, an individuals internet history is ready for court presentation. even in its raw form. evidence is ready. all the police need to do is seize the computer and interview the suspect. A whole prosecution package is ready in a matter of days. "The other enquiry is too controversial to be messed with" lady, butler-sloss resigned due to a family connection. Her brother was attorney general in the 80's. she was politically selected and ultimately found to be potentially bias. in a separate yet interesting story GCHQ et al have been found to be dabbling in political domestic discourse yet again. driving public opinion? http://www.bbc.co.uk /news/technology-283 06819. alas, I do not trust the establishment.[/p][/quote]Without going into my profession either... preparing files and evidence of this magnitude for courts... the crown courts is a mammoth task. This is not a simply job. Much conversation would of been had with expert lawyer's in this field advising what evidence would be required. There are many defences for having these sorts of images on a computer and all these defences need to be negated for court, not a simply process. Then you have a problem if the computer or chip/ file is password locked. The computer physically needs to be stripped down and each and every chip that has a thumb print of the images needs to be found. This can take many weeks, during this time the DP remains on police bail and NOT charged.[/p][/quote]common 128-bit encryption is easy to crack. The evidence collecting has just began. the first batch of cases will be before the courts in a matter of days/weeks. the story on this in the national press mentioned 'dark net' I suspect more IT resource and polished evidence will be available to the police as a direct result. I also suspect that the National Crime Agency where handed a vast quantity of information from other agencies whos job it is to monitor such traffic.[/p][/quote]this information was passed on with a specific brief though. I'm not saying that the evidence was fabricated, I'm sure that the suspects are as guilty as sin. but the time and presentation of this story is very much 'for media consumption' with two politically charged underlying motives. 1) The historic parliamentary child abuse inquiry 2) The data communication, emergency legislation passed through parliament. David Cameron was warmed up for reaction, political and agency pundits where stood by, the arrests where made. good result for the police and child protection but highly loaded for public opinion nudging. jayman
  • Score: 1

Comments are closed on this article.

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