Flytippers who block drains face prosecution

Clean-up – councillor Ray Howard, left, and Colin Letchford with a lawnmower dragged out of a drainage ditch.

Clean-up – councillor Ray Howard, left, and Colin Letchford with a lawnmower dragged out of a drainage ditch.

First published in News by

FLYTIPPERS will be prosecuted for clogging up drains and dykes, a councillor has warned.

In the wake of flash flooding across Canvey last month, the Environment Agency has found piles of rubbish blocking vital dykes and drains.

An office chair, food wrappers and bin bags of rubbish were dragged out of drains by officers over the weekend.

Now Ray Howard, Canvey county councillor responsible for floods and water management, is determined to stamp out the problem.

Mr Howard said: “It’s very disappointing when we are all trying to work together.

“We all have a major part to play and for people to be irresponsible by putting rubbish in dykes is unforgiveable. The council provides a good service at Waterside Farm recycling centre for people to take their refuse.

“There is no need to chuck it everywhere.

“It stops the water flow and affects flooding.

“We have to catch these people, name and shame them and prosecute them.

“The public do have to take some responsibility. People have to realise rubbish is a nuisance.”

Environment Agency workers have been busy clearing debris from dykes near pumping stations, including Hilton, near Buyl Avenue Colin Letchford, chairman of Friends of Concord Beach, saw an office chair pulled from a dyke.

He said: “On Friday, like many islanders, I was wondering if ex-hurricane Bertha would bring more flooding to Canvey. I felt enraged that with all the recent publicity about flooding on the island and the problems with the drainage, someone had disposed of the chair in this way.

“The Environment Agency has a massive task with these unprecedented heavy downpours and our drainage system would work much better if the uncaring individuals who discarded this rubbish would take more pride in our Island.”

THE Environment Agency is urging people to be careful with their rubbish.

Workers clean drains and dykes around the island’s 13 pumping stations on a weekly basis.

Dave Knagg, Essex operations manager for the agency, said: “Canvey is certainly not forgotten about, there is a heavy maintenance programme. We remove debris from protection screens near the pumping stations on a weekly basis.

“The screens are robust, but the litter can cause damage and block water.

“When there is a yellow weather warning, we try to get out early to do extra cleaning.

“We ask residents to pick up their litter and not to use the channels as a convenient disposal route for their garden waste as it can block up.”

On average, the agency removes about 80 tonnes of debris a year from drains and dykes.

If you see litter blocking a drain or dyke, call the agency’s 24-hour hotline on 0800 807060.

Comments (5)

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7:54am Wed 13 Aug 14

Kim Gandy says...

Will this be inclusive of absolutely everyone, or will it exclude certain sectors of the community like the rest of the law of this country?
Will this be inclusive of absolutely everyone, or will it exclude certain sectors of the community like the rest of the law of this country? Kim Gandy
  • Score: 1

7:58am Wed 13 Aug 14

pembury53 says...

what a daft statement...... surely fly tippers would be prosecuted for, er, fly tipping, although catching them would appear to be the first priority, never mind the list of offences they might face....
what a daft statement...... surely fly tippers would be prosecuted for, er, fly tipping, although catching them would appear to be the first priority, never mind the list of offences they might face.... pembury53
  • Score: 2

8:17am Wed 13 Aug 14

jayman says...

Employ a few men to walk the dykes and drains at night, equip then with night vision goggles so that the fly tippers can be caught (one or two per year).

Alternatively you could build a pump house and employ two men (per shift) to operate two Van Heck pumps (used in the Somerset floods) and to clear underground screens and tanks that are fed buy the drainage system.

just a thought...
Employ a few men to walk the dykes and drains at night, equip then with night vision goggles so that the fly tippers can be caught (one or two per year). Alternatively you could build a pump house and employ two men (per shift) to operate two Van Heck pumps (used in the Somerset floods) and to clear underground screens and tanks that are fed buy the drainage system. just a thought... jayman
  • Score: -2

8:22am Wed 13 Aug 14

Robin Reliant says...

they only get their knickers in a twist now and again, Flytipping is an on going problem that should be tackled daily and prosecutions more forth coming and not just a report in the paper now and again, its not taken seriously enough.
they only get their knickers in a twist now and again, Flytipping is an on going problem that should be tackled daily and prosecutions more forth coming and not just a report in the paper now and again, its not taken seriously enough. Robin Reliant
  • Score: 2

8:45am Wed 13 Aug 14

sesibollox says...

Kim Gandy wrote:
Will this be inclusive of absolutely everyone, or will it exclude certain sectors of the community like the rest of the law of this country?
I take it you're referring to the disabled, as to to direct it against an ethnic minority would be a criminal offence
[quote][p][bold]Kim Gandy[/bold] wrote: Will this be inclusive of absolutely everyone, or will it exclude certain sectors of the community like the rest of the law of this country?[/p][/quote]I take it you're referring to the disabled, as to to direct it against an ethnic minority would be a criminal offence sesibollox
  • Score: -1

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