Care home rapped for too few staff

Care home rapped for too few staff

Care home rapped for too few staff

First published in News

RESIDENTS at a care home were woken in the middle of the night to find people rummaging through their belongings, a health inspector found.

Inspectors from the Care Quality Commission found problems with staffing levels and hygiene at Stafford Hall, in Thundersley Park Road, Benfleet.

Two people told inspectors they kept their doors locked at night after “they had been woken during the night to find another person in their room going through their belongings”.

Others raised concerns about staffing levels, with one resident saying: “The staff do their absolute best, but they don’t have enough staff.

“There is an extra member of staff here and there, but the staff are at stretching point. I really don’t know how they cope.”

After the two-day inspection, the commission found staffing arrangements were “not sufficient to keep people safe”.

Four staff cared for 32 residents in the morning and three in the afternoon and at night, with the deputy manager stepping in when required.

Inspectors intervened after seeing a resident take the handles of another person’s wheelchair and spin them round when no staff were around.

Soiled commodes, a dirty hand basin and a broken sluice were discovered by inspectors and fridges and freezers were “dirty and unhygienic”

on the first day of the inspection.

The care home manager ensured they were clean for the following day, but inspectors found infection control audits highlighted issues with equipment and hygiene.

In spite of low staffing levels, employees were praised for being “motivated, caring and well-trained” with six employees trained as dementia champions, leading dementia care in the home. The report found care plans were reviewed on a regular basis and medicines were managed correctly.

The home, run by Runwood Homes, cares for up to 40 people, with many suffering from dementia.

It has sent the commission a report outlining what action it is going to take to meet essential standards.

Logan Logeswaran, managing director of Runwood Homes, said: “Following the recent inspection, the home has provided a robust action plan to the Care Quality Commission.

“All areas of concern have been actioned, including a review of staffing.

“The company has a policy to review staffing on a regular basis as residents’ dependency levels change from day to day, and it is our normal practice to review dependency against staff numbers and skills.”

Comments (5)

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10:41am Tue 26 Aug 14

Kim Gandy says...

This doesn't surprise me at all. I raised concerns about staffing numbers when working in another home. It was exactly the same. Too few staff, residents waiting ages for care because staff were pushed to the limits.

Also inadequate personal protective equipment. It was a joke.

Not funny for the residents though. People with dementia need constant care and they will "rummage" through belongings because they may not realise whose belongings they are. It's not intentional.

Dementia is an awful disease and those who have it deserve proper one to one care in an environment that feels safe and secure.

Staff cannot be blamed for this. It's the dreadful management at head office who pay no attention to staff's concerns and when you raise any you are likely to be singled out for the treatment.

Whistle blowers are treated even worse in care homes than they are in hospitals.

Care home management have little concern for residents' welfare; all they're concerned about is profit.

Shortcomings in a care home are usually blamed on staff who are treated like slaves, with long hours and low wages. You have to work the long hours to break even.

They also use a lot of imported staff because they will willingly work for low wages and this drives down wages for local staff.

It's time for a massive overhaul of care homes with management put squarely under the spotlight and forces them to provide not just adequate staffing levels but plentiful.

Wages need to be raised, training improved and management made culpable where this criteria is not in place.

And management found short of the mark should be struck off.
This doesn't surprise me at all. I raised concerns about staffing numbers when working in another home. It was exactly the same. Too few staff, residents waiting ages for care because staff were pushed to the limits. Also inadequate personal protective equipment. It was a joke. Not funny for the residents though. People with dementia need constant care and they will "rummage" through belongings because they may not realise whose belongings they are. It's not intentional. Dementia is an awful disease and those who have it deserve proper one to one care in an environment that feels safe and secure. Staff cannot be blamed for this. It's the dreadful management at head office who pay no attention to staff's concerns and when you raise any you are likely to be singled out for the treatment. Whistle blowers are treated even worse in care homes than they are in hospitals. Care home management have little concern for residents' welfare; all they're concerned about is profit. Shortcomings in a care home are usually blamed on staff who are treated like slaves, with long hours and low wages. You have to work the long hours to break even. They also use a lot of imported staff because they will willingly work for low wages and this drives down wages for local staff. It's time for a massive overhaul of care homes with management put squarely under the spotlight and forces them to provide not just adequate staffing levels but plentiful. Wages need to be raised, training improved and management made culpable where this criteria is not in place. And management found short of the mark should be struck off. Kim Gandy
  • Score: 14

2:23pm Tue 26 Aug 14

Canveyman24 says...

No surprise here. Sometimes when I was on shift, there would be one carer to every 8 residents. They do not receive the care they pay for ( and I can assure you it is more than you imagine), and I have witnessed many cases of mistreatment. At one home I worked at, the did not wish to tarnish their name, and when I said I would raise it to the care quality commission, within a week I was handed my resignation.
I would never willingly put a family member in a care home.
No surprise here. Sometimes when I was on shift, there would be one carer to every 8 residents. They do not receive the care they pay for ( and I can assure you it is more than you imagine), and I have witnessed many cases of mistreatment. At one home I worked at, the did not wish to tarnish their name, and when I said I would raise it to the care quality commission, within a week I was handed my resignation. I would never willingly put a family member in a care home. Canveyman24
  • Score: 7

2:24pm Tue 26 Aug 14

Canveyman24 says...

Above post was meant to say Notice, not resignation, and 'they did not wish to tarnish their name".
Above post was meant to say Notice, not resignation, and 'they did not wish to tarnish their name". Canveyman24
  • Score: 2

6:27pm Thu 28 Aug 14

debi1964 says...

I worked for Stafford hall many years ago & due to moving house I transferred to woodbury court laindon well all I can say is staff at Stafford hall wen I was there was always adequate & all worked as a team but at woodburyit was different case a lot of abuse going on and neglect on residents & alaways short staffed otherthan wen inspections were happening
I worked for Stafford hall many years ago & due to moving house I transferred to woodbury court laindon well all I can say is staff at Stafford hall wen I was there was always adequate & all worked as a team but at woodburyit was different case a lot of abuse going on and neglect on residents & alaways short staffed otherthan wen inspections were happening debi1964
  • Score: 1

8:14pm Thu 28 Aug 14

HAPPY THUNDERSLEY says...

My husband was in Staffod Hall w ith Dementia. We found it not at all adequate. The staff were quite good but thin on the ground. The
manager was about as good as a chocolate teapot. My husbands room
was kept very clean because the staff upstairs we very good. The carerers
were not trained for Dementia so did not know how to cope with the
Dementia patient so they were left to really cope alone. Thee got very frustated and lashed out with each other slapping and punching. I was often called and told my Husband was in trouble. But he was unsupervised, and was distressed. My daughters and myself then decided enough was enough. My husband was then moved to another home Godden Lodge were he is now happy and well cared for thank goodness
My husband was in Staffod Hall w ith Dementia. We found it not at all adequate. The staff were quite good but thin on the ground. The manager was about as good as a chocolate teapot. My husbands room was kept very clean because the staff upstairs we very good. The carerers were not trained for Dementia so did not know how to cope with the Dementia patient so they were left to really cope alone. Thee got very frustated and lashed out with each other slapping and punching. I was often called and told my Husband was in trouble. But he was unsupervised, and was distressed. My daughters and myself then decided enough was enough. My husband was then moved to another home Godden Lodge were he is now happy and well cared for thank goodness HAPPY THUNDERSLEY
  • Score: -1
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