Oliver, 15, banned from going to school prom

Echo: Disappointed – Oliver with a picture of himself in the tuxedo he was going to wear to the  prom Disappointed – Oliver with a picture of himself in the tuxedo he was going to wear to the prom

A SCHOOLBOY has been banned from his end of year school prom as punishment for his poor attendance.

Staff at King Edmund School, Rochford, believe Oliver Wright, 15, has simply missed too many days and therefore is not allowed to attend tonight’s celebrations His parents are furious as they insist Oliver has been ill and his attendance has been improving of late.

Dad Simon Wright also thinks they left it too late to tell Oliver. He said: “They told him with 48 hours to go. His car and suit was all booked paid for and ready to go. I think its deplorable.”

Oliver said: “I’ve been looking forward to this for so long. I was meant to take my friend Amber and we had a Rolls Royce limo booked, but now she has to go on her own. It was going to be the first time in my life I was going to get suited and booted. Now I have to take it back.”

The school says it sets a target of 94 per cent attendance and sent a letter to all parents at the start of the school year outlining the expectations and stating that if pupils had poor attendance they would sacrifice going to the prom.

A further letter was sent to Oliver’s parents in February.

Oliver’s mum Catrina Wright said: “His attendance was bad because he has asthma and gets migraines.

“He’s not a naughty child, he has dyslexia and the school can’t seem to cope with learning difficulties. He got his attendance up from 63 per cent to 78 per cent. Then we find out short notice he’s not allowed to go. It’s every child’s right to go to their prom.”

Headteacher Jonathan Osborn said all students had to maintain good standards of attendance and behaviour if they were to attend the prom.

He added: “This is a common approach for many schools.“Obviously we want every student to attend the prom, and individual circumstances are always taken into account when a decision is made that a student cannot attend.”

Comments (66)

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1:09pm Mon 14 May 12

livethedream says...

Child punished for not doing as told...
Child punished for not doing as told... livethedream
  • Score: 2

1:11pm Mon 14 May 12

Requiescat says...

Must be against his human rights, get on the phone to Strasbourg.
Must be against his human rights, get on the phone to Strasbourg. Requiescat
  • Score: 2

1:12pm Mon 14 May 12

tepluap says...

sell the suit , cancel the car and donate the money to charity.

It isn't his right to go to the prom,
sell the suit , cancel the car and donate the money to charity. It isn't his right to go to the prom, tepluap
  • Score: 3

1:14pm Mon 14 May 12

teyeagle says...

Rules are rules; they were set out for everyone!
Now 63% attendance = 3 days a week in school, even with the improved figure the lad only attends less than 4 days a week. If he spent more time at school he could have worked that out for himself and saved his parents the embarrassment of complaining to the press!
Rules are rules; they were set out for everyone! Now 63% attendance = 3 days a week in school, even with the improved figure the lad only attends less than 4 days a week. If he spent more time at school he could have worked that out for himself and saved his parents the embarrassment of complaining to the press! teyeagle
  • Score: 1

1:25pm Mon 14 May 12

the church of asbo says...

http://www.youtube.c
om/watch?v=gFfydjatQ
MU

.
skip to 3.00
http://www.youtube.c om/watch?v=gFfydjatQ MU . skip to 3.00 the church of asbo
  • Score: 1

1:32pm Mon 14 May 12

Happy in Westcliff says...

Despite the School making it abundantly clear what the policy is and sending a further reminder unfortunately the boy is being denied the opportunity to exercise his right to go to the prom. Phone the lawyers!!!
Despite the School making it abundantly clear what the policy is and sending a further reminder unfortunately the boy is being denied the opportunity to exercise his right to go to the prom. Phone the lawyers!!! Happy in Westcliff
  • Score: 1

1:36pm Mon 14 May 12

the church of asbo says...

with those truancy rates shouldn't there be custodial for the parents?
with those truancy rates shouldn't there be custodial for the parents? the church of asbo
  • Score: 1

1:41pm Mon 14 May 12

frank & monty says...

Man up and get over it, Ollie.
I bet the thought of Amber snogging one of your classmates will set off another 'migraine' attack.
Man up and get over it, Ollie. I bet the thought of Amber snogging one of your classmates will set off another 'migraine' attack. frank & monty
  • Score: 2

1:49pm Mon 14 May 12

Doughnut says...

Another parent running to the papers when their child is in the wrong. If I was the limo driver I wouldn't bother picking him up anyway, cos there's only a 78% chance he'll be going. All that loud party music is no good for migraines you know !!
Another parent running to the papers when their child is in the wrong. If I was the limo driver I wouldn't bother picking him up anyway, cos there's only a 78% chance he'll be going. All that loud party music is no good for migraines you know !! Doughnut
  • Score: 1

1:55pm Mon 14 May 12

AndyBSG says...

And this story is a prime example of what is wrong with society and youth today.

The sense of entitlement people have thinking they just automatically deserve good things in life handed on a plate to them is a joke.

I can see him on here in a few years time complaining about how all his friends who've done their A-Levels and degrees have got well paid jobs while he is being victimised because he didn't turn up for college, so failed all his exams and now has to work for minimum wage.

Besides, it's probably best he doesn't go to prom because if his asthma is so severe that he averaged more than 1 day a week off sick then imagine what all that dancing and dry ice would do too him...
And this story is a prime example of what is wrong with society and youth today. The sense of entitlement people have thinking they just automatically deserve good things in life handed on a plate to them is a joke. I can see him on here in a few years time complaining about how all his friends who've done their A-Levels and degrees have got well paid jobs while he is being victimised because he didn't turn up for college, so failed all his exams and now has to work for minimum wage. Besides, it's probably best he doesn't go to prom because if his asthma is so severe that he averaged more than 1 day a week off sick then imagine what all that dancing and dry ice would do too him... AndyBSG
  • Score: 3

1:57pm Mon 14 May 12

al coniston says...

Sorry, but i find myself disagreeing with the majority of posters in here. In the event that the pupil was genuinely sick (and was able to support this with medical evidence) then there would be a case of prejudice on the part of the school. Just as a company would have legal obligations with regards to a sick employee, then the school should have an equal obligation to ensure that their pupils were treated under similar conditions.

It seems that in this case, the school have taken a rather immature approach and one which also suggests that they are bringing the pupils honesty and integrity into doubt. That would be rather foolhardy should they be unable to substantiate that.
Sorry, but i find myself disagreeing with the majority of posters in here. In the event that the pupil was genuinely sick (and was able to support this with medical evidence) then there would be a case of prejudice on the part of the school. Just as a company would have legal obligations with regards to a sick employee, then the school should have an equal obligation to ensure that their pupils were treated under similar conditions. It seems that in this case, the school have taken a rather immature approach and one which also suggests that they are bringing the pupils honesty and integrity into doubt. That would be rather foolhardy should they be unable to substantiate that. al coniston
  • Score: 2

2:05pm Mon 14 May 12

Leighdweller says...

Too bloody right he shouldn't go! More importantly, what on earth is the school having a 'prom' for anyway? Are we in America???
Too bloody right he shouldn't go! More importantly, what on earth is the school having a 'prom' for anyway? Are we in America??? Leighdweller
  • Score: 1

2:19pm Mon 14 May 12

Derek_Christmas says...

How has this got into the paper? What a loser...
How has this got into the paper? What a loser... Derek_Christmas
  • Score: 0

2:49pm Mon 14 May 12

Born & bread says...

Gutted!
Gutted! Born & bread
  • Score: 0

2:49pm Mon 14 May 12

doasilikey says...

Selfish sod! Keep the Roller booked for the disappointed(??) Amber, poor thing.
Selfish sod! Keep the Roller booked for the disappointed(??) Amber, poor thing. doasilikey
  • Score: 0

2:50pm Mon 14 May 12

Elephantman2 says...

al coniston wrote:
Sorry, but i find myself disagreeing with the majority of posters in here. In the event that the pupil was genuinely sick (and was able to support this with medical evidence) then there would be a case of prejudice on the part of the school. Just as a company would have legal obligations with regards to a sick employee, then the school should have an equal obligation to ensure that their pupils were treated under similar conditions.

It seems that in this case, the school have taken a rather immature approach and one which also suggests that they are bringing the pupils honesty and integrity into doubt. That would be rather foolhardy should they be unable to substantiate that.
I tend to agree with you. Either the lad has long term health issues or not. If he does have long term health issues that should have been taken in to account when assesing his eligability to attend the prom.

If (god forbid) the lad had taken a significant amount of time off for a disease such as cancer there would be uproar at him been banned from the prom.

Asthma kills, as do many other diseases that don't seem to resonate with the general public.

The majority of responses sum up the "macho" approach to illness that we see in this country; you're a hero if you go to work with the flu; the fact that somone may have died because you passed the illness on isn't taken in to account.

I hope one day we'll all take a more mature attitude to sickness and ill health; but some how I doubt that we will.
[quote][p][bold]al coniston[/bold] wrote: Sorry, but i find myself disagreeing with the majority of posters in here. In the event that the pupil was genuinely sick (and was able to support this with medical evidence) then there would be a case of prejudice on the part of the school. Just as a company would have legal obligations with regards to a sick employee, then the school should have an equal obligation to ensure that their pupils were treated under similar conditions. It seems that in this case, the school have taken a rather immature approach and one which also suggests that they are bringing the pupils honesty and integrity into doubt. That would be rather foolhardy should they be unable to substantiate that.[/p][/quote]I tend to agree with you. Either the lad has long term health issues or not. If he does have long term health issues that should have been taken in to account when assesing his eligability to attend the prom. If (god forbid) the lad had taken a significant amount of time off for a disease such as cancer there would be uproar at him been banned from the prom. Asthma kills, as do many other diseases that don't seem to resonate with the general public. The majority of responses sum up the "macho" approach to illness that we see in this country; you're a hero if you go to work with the flu; the fact that somone may have died because you passed the illness on isn't taken in to account. I hope one day we'll all take a more mature attitude to sickness and ill health; but some how I doubt that we will. Elephantman2
  • Score: 2

2:52pm Mon 14 May 12

streetboy75 says...

anything to get in the local paper, poor boy will get the right p**s taken out of him now when his mates see this, but i have to agree rules are rules. if the school was to let him go then it opens the flood gates to everyone else.
anything to get in the local paper, poor boy will get the right p**s taken out of him now when his mates see this, but i have to agree rules are rules. if the school was to let him go then it opens the flood gates to everyone else. streetboy75
  • Score: 0

3:03pm Mon 14 May 12

ccd says...

Elephantman2 wrote:
al coniston wrote:
Sorry, but i find myself disagreeing with the majority of posters in here. In the event that the pupil was genuinely sick (and was able to support this with medical evidence) then there would be a case of prejudice on the part of the school. Just as a company would have legal obligations with regards to a sick employee, then the school should have an equal obligation to ensure that their pupils were treated under similar conditions.

It seems that in this case, the school have taken a rather immature approach and one which also suggests that they are bringing the pupils honesty and integrity into doubt. That would be rather foolhardy should they be unable to substantiate that.
I tend to agree with you. Either the lad has long term health issues or not. If he does have long term health issues that should have been taken in to account when assesing his eligability to attend the prom.

If (god forbid) the lad had taken a significant amount of time off for a disease such as cancer there would be uproar at him been banned from the prom.

Asthma kills, as do many other diseases that don't seem to resonate with the general public.

The majority of responses sum up the "macho" approach to illness that we see in this country; you're a hero if you go to work with the flu; the fact that somone may have died because you passed the illness on isn't taken in to account.

I hope one day we'll all take a more mature attitude to sickness and ill health; but some how I doubt that we will.
Same thought here. It seems quite wrong to penalise someone if they've been genuinely ill so I can only assume the school either believe he's not been as ill as claimed or has made a major error of judgement. I also agree with other comments about the rampant entitlement culture so the 'rights' line is somewhat laughable.
[quote][p][bold]Elephantman2[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]al coniston[/bold] wrote: Sorry, but i find myself disagreeing with the majority of posters in here. In the event that the pupil was genuinely sick (and was able to support this with medical evidence) then there would be a case of prejudice on the part of the school. Just as a company would have legal obligations with regards to a sick employee, then the school should have an equal obligation to ensure that their pupils were treated under similar conditions. It seems that in this case, the school have taken a rather immature approach and one which also suggests that they are bringing the pupils honesty and integrity into doubt. That would be rather foolhardy should they be unable to substantiate that.[/p][/quote]I tend to agree with you. Either the lad has long term health issues or not. If he does have long term health issues that should have been taken in to account when assesing his eligability to attend the prom. If (god forbid) the lad had taken a significant amount of time off for a disease such as cancer there would be uproar at him been banned from the prom. Asthma kills, as do many other diseases that don't seem to resonate with the general public. The majority of responses sum up the "macho" approach to illness that we see in this country; you're a hero if you go to work with the flu; the fact that somone may have died because you passed the illness on isn't taken in to account. I hope one day we'll all take a more mature attitude to sickness and ill health; but some how I doubt that we will.[/p][/quote]Same thought here. It seems quite wrong to penalise someone if they've been genuinely ill so I can only assume the school either believe he's not been as ill as claimed or has made a major error of judgement. I also agree with other comments about the rampant entitlement culture so the 'rights' line is somewhat laughable. ccd
  • Score: 1

3:09pm Mon 14 May 12

PJR121 says...

I have a friend who had bad asthma attacks - he managed to get through a school year fine - probably two weeks off if that.

Sorry, It doesn't wash with me. The school set rules, the boy didn't meet those rules, so he can't go. The parents were informed in Feburary that there was a problem and he may not be able to go too.

Instead they've run to the papers.

Echo - I didn't have a prom at my school when I left in 1998, can I be in the paper, as I didn't get a chance to go to one?
I have a friend who had bad asthma attacks - he managed to get through a school year fine - probably two weeks off if that. Sorry, It doesn't wash with me. The school set rules, the boy didn't meet those rules, so he can't go. The parents were informed in Feburary that there was a problem and he may not be able to go too. Instead they've run to the papers. Echo - I didn't have a prom at my school when I left in 1998, can I be in the paper, as I didn't get a chance to go to one? PJR121
  • Score: -1

3:11pm Mon 14 May 12

Broadwaywatch says...

al coniston wrote:
Sorry, but i find myself disagreeing with the majority of posters in here. In the event that the pupil was genuinely sick (and was able to support this with medical evidence) then there would be a case of prejudice on the part of the school. Just as a company would have legal obligations with regards to a sick employee, then the school should have an equal obligation to ensure that their pupils were treated under similar conditions.

It seems that in this case, the school have taken a rather immature approach and one which also suggests that they are bringing the pupils honesty and integrity into doubt. That would be rather foolhardy should they be unable to substantiate that.
You Sir are a mischief maker
In the Army you would be known and dispised as a Barrack Room Lawyer
[quote][p][bold]al coniston[/bold] wrote: Sorry, but i find myself disagreeing with the majority of posters in here. In the event that the pupil was genuinely sick (and was able to support this with medical evidence) then there would be a case of prejudice on the part of the school. Just as a company would have legal obligations with regards to a sick employee, then the school should have an equal obligation to ensure that their pupils were treated under similar conditions. It seems that in this case, the school have taken a rather immature approach and one which also suggests that they are bringing the pupils honesty and integrity into doubt. That would be rather foolhardy should they be unable to substantiate that.[/p][/quote]You Sir are a mischief maker In the Army you would be known and dispised as a Barrack Room Lawyer Broadwaywatch
  • Score: 0

3:21pm Mon 14 May 12

Elephantman2 says...

PJR121 wrote:
I have a friend who had bad asthma attacks - he managed to get through a school year fine - probably two weeks off if that.

Sorry, It doesn't wash with me. The school set rules, the boy didn't meet those rules, so he can't go. The parents were informed in Feburary that there was a problem and he may not be able to go too.

Instead they've run to the papers.

Echo - I didn't have a prom at my school when I left in 1998, can I be in the paper, as I didn't get a chance to go to one?
I know a number of people living with asthma and two that have died; what are you saying exactly?
[quote][p][bold]PJR121[/bold] wrote: I have a friend who had bad asthma attacks - he managed to get through a school year fine - probably two weeks off if that. Sorry, It doesn't wash with me. The school set rules, the boy didn't meet those rules, so he can't go. The parents were informed in Feburary that there was a problem and he may not be able to go too. Instead they've run to the papers. Echo - I didn't have a prom at my school when I left in 1998, can I be in the paper, as I didn't get a chance to go to one?[/p][/quote]I know a number of people living with asthma and two that have died; what are you saying exactly? Elephantman2
  • Score: 1

3:25pm Mon 14 May 12

Elephantman2 says...

Broadwaywatch wrote:
al coniston wrote:
Sorry, but i find myself disagreeing with the majority of posters in here. In the event that the pupil was genuinely sick (and was able to support this with medical evidence) then there would be a case of prejudice on the part of the school. Just as a company would have legal obligations with regards to a sick employee, then the school should have an equal obligation to ensure that their pupils were treated under similar conditions.

It seems that in this case, the school have taken a rather immature approach and one which also suggests that they are bringing the pupils honesty and integrity into doubt. That would be rather foolhardy should they be unable to substantiate that.
You Sir are a mischief maker
In the Army you would be known and dispised as a Barrack Room Lawyer
And you must be related to a WW1 General; never saw the front; hated and despised by the troops. You Sir are a buffoon!
[quote][p][bold]Broadwaywatch[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]al coniston[/bold] wrote: Sorry, but i find myself disagreeing with the majority of posters in here. In the event that the pupil was genuinely sick (and was able to support this with medical evidence) then there would be a case of prejudice on the part of the school. Just as a company would have legal obligations with regards to a sick employee, then the school should have an equal obligation to ensure that their pupils were treated under similar conditions. It seems that in this case, the school have taken a rather immature approach and one which also suggests that they are bringing the pupils honesty and integrity into doubt. That would be rather foolhardy should they be unable to substantiate that.[/p][/quote]You Sir are a mischief maker In the Army you would be known and dispised as a Barrack Room Lawyer[/p][/quote]And you must be related to a WW1 General; never saw the front; hated and despised by the troops. You Sir are a buffoon! Elephantman2
  • Score: 0

3:26pm Mon 14 May 12

ahhh says...

2 problems with this, among many others actually but....
In what world is 3 months short notice?
And how is the fact he is dyslexic, and that apparently the school can't cope with learning difficulties, relevant to the fact that poor Oliver can't go to the prom because he didn't follow the rules? It's pathetic.
2 problems with this, among many others actually but.... In what world is 3 months short notice? And how is the fact he is dyslexic, and that apparently the school can't cope with learning difficulties, relevant to the fact that poor Oliver can't go to the prom because he didn't follow the rules? It's pathetic. ahhh
  • Score: 0

3:40pm Mon 14 May 12

notinwestcliffanymore says...

I know a young fella with leukaemia, over the course of the school period (5years) he has had nearly 9 months out, although he kept up with his work as best as possible,
do you all want to vote yes or no should he be allowed to his school prom ?
I know a young fella with leukaemia, over the course of the school period (5years) he has had nearly 9 months out, although he kept up with his work as best as possible, do you all want to vote yes or no should he be allowed to his school prom ? notinwestcliffanymore
  • Score: 1

3:41pm Mon 14 May 12

al coniston says...

Broadwaywatch wrote:
al coniston wrote:
Sorry, but i find myself disagreeing with the majority of posters in here. In the event that the pupil was genuinely sick (and was able to support this with medical evidence) then there would be a case of prejudice on the part of the school. Just as a company would have legal obligations with regards to a sick employee, then the school should have an equal obligation to ensure that their pupils were treated under similar conditions.

It seems that in this case, the school have taken a rather immature approach and one which also suggests that they are bringing the pupils honesty and integrity into doubt. That would be rather foolhardy should they be unable to substantiate that.
You Sir are a mischief maker
In the Army you would be known and dispised as a Barrack Room Lawyer
Despise me all you like, but instead of berating the boy, try and look at it from all angles . . . i certainly hope that the school have done that, and not just made an example of him which, on the limited evidence before us, suggests pretty poor form to be honest !
[quote][p][bold]Broadwaywatch[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]al coniston[/bold] wrote: Sorry, but i find myself disagreeing with the majority of posters in here. In the event that the pupil was genuinely sick (and was able to support this with medical evidence) then there would be a case of prejudice on the part of the school. Just as a company would have legal obligations with regards to a sick employee, then the school should have an equal obligation to ensure that their pupils were treated under similar conditions. It seems that in this case, the school have taken a rather immature approach and one which also suggests that they are bringing the pupils honesty and integrity into doubt. That would be rather foolhardy should they be unable to substantiate that.[/p][/quote]You Sir are a mischief maker In the Army you would be known and dispised as a Barrack Room Lawyer[/p][/quote]Despise me all you like, but instead of berating the boy, try and look at it from all angles . . . i certainly hope that the school have done that, and not just made an example of him which, on the limited evidence before us, suggests pretty poor form to be honest ! al coniston
  • Score: 0

3:56pm Mon 14 May 12

Andycal 172D says...

The simple answer is turn up at school then get sent home because of the "migraine". Then it doesn't look like you're bunking off. Schmuck!

But if he has a migraine 22% of the time, then he should be receiving care from a neurosurgeon - not a DJ
The simple answer is turn up at school then get sent home because of the "migraine". Then it doesn't look like you're bunking off. Schmuck! But if he has a migraine 22% of the time, then he should be receiving care from a neurosurgeon - not a DJ Andycal 172D
  • Score: 1

4:05pm Mon 14 May 12

The Cowboy says...

Almost certainly a missing part to this story. If he lad genuinely suffers from asthma and migraines, and this has been reported to the school with medical notes to back it up, then boo to the school for being so mean-spirited.

But something tells me this isn't the case. The bitterness from the parents, as shown in the comment about the school being unable to handle his learning difficulties, sounds like there's more to this than meets the eye.
Almost certainly a missing part to this story. If he lad genuinely suffers from asthma and migraines, and this has been reported to the school with medical notes to back it up, then boo to the school for being so mean-spirited. But something tells me this isn't the case. The bitterness from the parents, as shown in the comment about the school being unable to handle his learning difficulties, sounds like there's more to this than meets the eye. The Cowboy
  • Score: 1

4:07pm Mon 14 May 12

The Cater Wood Creeper says...

he'll miss out on the fourth of july celebrations and Martin Luther king day too......
he'll miss out on the fourth of july celebrations and Martin Luther king day too...... The Cater Wood Creeper
  • Score: 0

4:13pm Mon 14 May 12

Blind Haze says...

A few points.

If, following the letter in February, his attendance improved from 63% to 78% then were some of the days off previously unwarranted?

Is this improvement solely due to the threat of not being able to go to the prom?

Why is the dyslexia even mentioned? Unfortunate and sad, yes. Although is it a reason to have time off?

The parents were prewarned of what would happen if any child had fallen below 94% attendance - presumably the school would have to leave it as late as possible before 'banning' anyone from coming to accomodate the children on the cusp. When you know that your child is off 30% of the time, do you not think you should contact the school to see if he is allowed to go before going to the expense of hiring a Rolls Royce and buying/hiring a suit and tuxedo?

With the child's sickness record, surely there is a 30% chance that they wouldn't be able to make the prom anyway and so it's a lot of expense for something that they won't be able to attend (for 2 reasons).

The afflictions that Oliver has are sad and unfortunate - however I think this matter should have been taken up with the school to try and claim special dispensation rather than going to the newspaper.
A few points. If, following the letter in February, his attendance improved from 63% to 78% then were some of the days off previously unwarranted? Is this improvement solely due to the threat of not being able to go to the prom? Why is the dyslexia even mentioned? Unfortunate and sad, yes. Although is it a reason to have time off? The parents were prewarned of what would happen if any child had fallen below 94% attendance - presumably the school would have to leave it as late as possible before 'banning' anyone from coming to accomodate the children on the cusp. When you know that your child is off 30% of the time, do you not think you should contact the school to see if he is allowed to go before going to the expense of hiring a Rolls Royce and buying/hiring a suit and tuxedo? With the child's sickness record, surely there is a 30% chance that they wouldn't be able to make the prom anyway and so it's a lot of expense for something that they won't be able to attend (for 2 reasons). The afflictions that Oliver has are sad and unfortunate - however I think this matter should have been taken up with the school to try and claim special dispensation rather than going to the newspaper. Blind Haze
  • Score: 0

4:16pm Mon 14 May 12

Richy don't shine shoes no more says...

I went to King Edmunds, unsympathetic is not an accusation I'd level at them so I'm tended to side with the school.

"But if he has a migraine 22% of the time, then he should be receiving care from a neurosurgeon - not a DJ" Brilliant
I went to King Edmunds, unsympathetic is not an accusation I'd level at them so I'm tended to side with the school. "But if he has a migraine 22% of the time, then he should be receiving care from a neurosurgeon - not a DJ" Brilliant Richy don't shine shoes no more
  • Score: 0

4:18pm Mon 14 May 12

E-Types says...

Elephantman2 wrote:
Broadwaywatch wrote:
al coniston wrote:
Sorry, but i find myself disagreeing with the majority of posters in here. In the event that the pupil was genuinely sick (and was able to support this with medical evidence) then there would be a case of prejudice on the part of the school. Just as a company would have legal obligations with regards to a sick employee, then the school should have an equal obligation to ensure that their pupils were treated under similar conditions.

It seems that in this case, the school have taken a rather immature approach and one which also suggests that they are bringing the pupils honesty and integrity into doubt. That would be rather foolhardy should they be unable to substantiate that.
You Sir are a mischief maker
In the Army you would be known and dispised as a Barrack Room Lawyer
And you must be related to a WW1 General; never saw the front; hated and despised by the troops. You Sir are a buffoon!
Touche!
[quote][p][bold]Elephantman2[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Broadwaywatch[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]al coniston[/bold] wrote: Sorry, but i find myself disagreeing with the majority of posters in here. In the event that the pupil was genuinely sick (and was able to support this with medical evidence) then there would be a case of prejudice on the part of the school. Just as a company would have legal obligations with regards to a sick employee, then the school should have an equal obligation to ensure that their pupils were treated under similar conditions. It seems that in this case, the school have taken a rather immature approach and one which also suggests that they are bringing the pupils honesty and integrity into doubt. That would be rather foolhardy should they be unable to substantiate that.[/p][/quote]You Sir are a mischief maker In the Army you would be known and dispised as a Barrack Room Lawyer[/p][/quote]And you must be related to a WW1 General; never saw the front; hated and despised by the troops. You Sir are a buffoon![/p][/quote]Touche! E-Types
  • Score: 0

4:20pm Mon 14 May 12

The Cater Wood Creeper says...

he could go and sit outside with a root beer and a corndog and some pretzels
he could go and sit outside with a root beer and a corndog and some pretzels The Cater Wood Creeper
  • Score: 0

4:41pm Mon 14 May 12

APR says...

"....His car and suit was all booked paid for and ready to go...."

This probably says more about the parents.
"....His car and suit was all booked paid for and ready to go...." This probably says more about the parents. APR
  • Score: 0

4:57pm Mon 14 May 12

ShoeburyGuy17 says...

I'm all in favour of the school banning the young man.

As a youngster I was bullied beyond belief. I would be beaten up and even had my legs broken by the little critters.

Because you've got 'asthma and get migraines' and Dyslexia, doesn't mean you have special treatment.

I Had - 99.5% Attendance throughout the whole of my Secondary Education, 100% Primary and 100% in my A-level.

I would be ill but go to the place of my education. A little sniffle and children these days have weeks off.

My 2 cents
I'm all in favour of the school banning the young man. As a youngster I was bullied beyond belief. I would be beaten up and even had my legs broken by the little critters. Because you've got 'asthma and get migraines' and Dyslexia, doesn't mean you have special treatment. I Had - 99.5% Attendance throughout the whole of my Secondary Education, 100% Primary and 100% in my A-level. I would be ill but go to the place of my education. A little sniffle and children these days have weeks off. My 2 cents ShoeburyGuy17
  • Score: -1

5:01pm Mon 14 May 12

al coniston says...

I trust that all pupils who failed to attain at least a 94 percent attendance will also be prohibited from attending the prom.
I trust that all pupils who failed to attain at least a 94 percent attendance will also be prohibited from attending the prom. al coniston
  • Score: 1

5:39pm Mon 14 May 12

Nebs says...

al coniston wrote:
I trust that all pupils who failed to attain at least a 94 percent attendance will also be prohibited from attending the prom.
The Head said at the end that individual circumstances are always taken into account. Unless we are told the individual circumstances in this case then it is difficult to form an opinion either way.

I'm not too impressed with the photo he is holding. My first thoughts, before reading the caption, was that he was in school uniform with his shirt hanging out.
[quote][p][bold]al coniston[/bold] wrote: I trust that all pupils who failed to attain at least a 94 percent attendance will also be prohibited from attending the prom.[/p][/quote]The Head said at the end that individual circumstances are always taken into account. Unless we are told the individual circumstances in this case then it is difficult to form an opinion either way. I'm not too impressed with the photo he is holding. My first thoughts, before reading the caption, was that he was in school uniform with his shirt hanging out. Nebs
  • Score: -1

5:48pm Mon 14 May 12

yellowfairy says...

Rules are there for a reason. If his parents had taken the time they took to contact the paper into informing the school as to why he was absent then it wouldn't be a problem, they re the ones to blame not the school. A lot of children suffer from Asthma and learning difficulties but they still make it to school everyday. Look to your parents to blame son.
Rules are there for a reason. If his parents had taken the time they took to contact the paper into informing the school as to why he was absent then it wouldn't be a problem, they re the ones to blame not the school. A lot of children suffer from Asthma and learning difficulties but they still make it to school everyday. Look to your parents to blame son. yellowfairy
  • Score: 0

6:03pm Mon 14 May 12

JimmySays1 says...

Let him go to the prom and lock his no good parents up for a week. If a kid can get out of school then it can only be the parents or guardians fault for allowing him to bunk off.
Let him go to the prom and lock his no good parents up for a week. If a kid can get out of school then it can only be the parents or guardians fault for allowing him to bunk off. JimmySays1
  • Score: 0

6:20pm Mon 14 May 12

Doughnut says...

Anyway, I thought that if you were genuinely ill (and informed the school in the correct way) then that is classed as authorised absence. Correct if i'm wrong, but wouldn't this punishment be in relation to unauthorised absense ?
Anyway, I thought that if you were genuinely ill (and informed the school in the correct way) then that is classed as authorised absence. Correct if i'm wrong, but wouldn't this punishment be in relation to unauthorised absense ? Doughnut
  • Score: 0

6:48pm Mon 14 May 12

Fallguy9999 says...

Absence is absence. If he worked for me with attendance like that i would be looking to dismiss him!
In my view the school is teaching him a valuable lesson for the future!
Absence is absence. If he worked for me with attendance like that i would be looking to dismiss him! In my view the school is teaching him a valuable lesson for the future! Fallguy9999
  • Score: 0

8:00pm Mon 14 May 12

boozybex says...

sick was he?
sick of school by the sounds of it! if he's too ill for school he's too ill to go out!
sick was he? sick of school by the sounds of it! if he's too ill for school he's too ill to go out! boozybex
  • Score: 0

8:13pm Mon 14 May 12

stonybrig says...

would his attendance improve if he went to the prom ?
i wonder, maybe the school is making example...whoKnows ?
would his attendance improve if he went to the prom ? i wonder, maybe the school is making example...whoKnows ? stonybrig
  • Score: 0

9:03pm Mon 14 May 12

A Dermot says...

I think Amber has had a lucky escape.
I think Amber has had a lucky escape. A Dermot
  • Score: 0

9:09pm Mon 14 May 12

the church of asbo says...

so this kid is completely bothered about having any academic take-away from the school. the only thing his parents and he cares about is attendance at a 3hr non-event that will mean the square root of jack all for the rest of his life. the parents need to crawl in shame back under the same rock from whence they came. if i were a betting man (which i am) i would put a large amount of money on a fall in attendance rates post the chav fest
so this kid is completely bothered about having any academic take-away from the school. the only thing his parents and he cares about is attendance at a 3hr non-event that will mean the square root of jack all for the rest of his life. the parents need to crawl in shame back under the same rock from whence they came. if i were a betting man (which i am) i would put a large amount of money on a fall in attendance rates post the chav fest the church of asbo
  • Score: 0

11:14pm Mon 14 May 12

jackdt09 says...

ccd wrote:
Elephantman2 wrote:
al coniston wrote:
Sorry, but i find myself disagreeing with the majority of posters in here. In the event that the pupil was genuinely sick (and was able to support this with medical evidence) then there would be a case of prejudice on the part of the school. Just as a company would have legal obligations with regards to a sick employee, then the school should have an equal obligation to ensure that their pupils were treated under similar conditions.

It seems that in this case, the school have taken a rather immature approach and one which also suggests that they are bringing the pupils honesty and integrity into doubt. That would be rather foolhardy should they be unable to substantiate that.
I tend to agree with you. Either the lad has long term health issues or not. If he does have long term health issues that should have been taken in to account when assesing his eligability to attend the prom.

If (god forbid) the lad had taken a significant amount of time off for a disease such as cancer there would be uproar at him been banned from the prom.

Asthma kills, as do many other diseases that don't seem to resonate with the general public.

The majority of responses sum up the "macho" approach to illness that we see in this country; you're a hero if you go to work with the flu; the fact that somone may have died because you passed the illness on isn't taken in to account.

I hope one day we'll all take a more mature attitude to sickness and ill health; but some how I doubt that we will.
Same thought here. It seems quite wrong to penalise someone if they've been genuinely ill so I can only assume the school either believe he's not been as ill as claimed or has made a major error of judgement. I also agree with other comments about the rampant entitlement culture so the 'rights' line is somewhat laughable.
I was considering the same thing. But on the other hand, if you're illness is so bad that you can't make school on more than 4 days a week, basically getting a 3 day weekend every week, then what were the chances he would be fit enough to go to a prom with loud music, lots of people, possibly smoke machines etc.?
Either you're ill or you're not. Its similar to the people who take time off work sick but then manage to go out in the evening.
[quote][p][bold]ccd[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Elephantman2[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]al coniston[/bold] wrote: Sorry, but i find myself disagreeing with the majority of posters in here. In the event that the pupil was genuinely sick (and was able to support this with medical evidence) then there would be a case of prejudice on the part of the school. Just as a company would have legal obligations with regards to a sick employee, then the school should have an equal obligation to ensure that their pupils were treated under similar conditions. It seems that in this case, the school have taken a rather immature approach and one which also suggests that they are bringing the pupils honesty and integrity into doubt. That would be rather foolhardy should they be unable to substantiate that.[/p][/quote]I tend to agree with you. Either the lad has long term health issues or not. If he does have long term health issues that should have been taken in to account when assesing his eligability to attend the prom. If (god forbid) the lad had taken a significant amount of time off for a disease such as cancer there would be uproar at him been banned from the prom. Asthma kills, as do many other diseases that don't seem to resonate with the general public. The majority of responses sum up the "macho" approach to illness that we see in this country; you're a hero if you go to work with the flu; the fact that somone may have died because you passed the illness on isn't taken in to account. I hope one day we'll all take a more mature attitude to sickness and ill health; but some how I doubt that we will.[/p][/quote]Same thought here. It seems quite wrong to penalise someone if they've been genuinely ill so I can only assume the school either believe he's not been as ill as claimed or has made a major error of judgement. I also agree with other comments about the rampant entitlement culture so the 'rights' line is somewhat laughable.[/p][/quote]I was considering the same thing. But on the other hand, if you're illness is so bad that you can't make school on more than 4 days a week, basically getting a 3 day weekend every week, then what were the chances he would be fit enough to go to a prom with loud music, lots of people, possibly smoke machines etc.? Either you're ill or you're not. Its similar to the people who take time off work sick but then manage to go out in the evening. jackdt09
  • Score: 0

6:19am Tue 15 May 12

Eric the Red says...

Leighdweller wrote:
Too bloody right he shouldn't go! More importantly, what on earth is the school having a 'prom' for anyway? Are we in America???
Just another 'let's copy America' item. "Hi guys; absolutely; have a nice day!"
[quote][p][bold]Leighdweller[/bold] wrote: Too bloody right he shouldn't go! More importantly, what on earth is the school having a 'prom' for anyway? Are we in America???[/p][/quote]Just another 'let's copy America' item. "Hi guys; absolutely; have a nice day!" Eric the Red
  • Score: 0

7:31am Tue 15 May 12

muffindamule says...

ShoeburyGuy17 wrote:
I'm all in favour of the school banning the young man.

As a youngster I was bullied beyond belief. I would be beaten up and even had my legs broken by the little critters.

Because you've got 'asthma and get migraines' and Dyslexia, doesn't mean you have special treatment.

I Had - 99.5% Attendance throughout the whole of my Secondary Education, 100% Primary and 100% in my A-level.

I would be ill but go to the place of my education. A little sniffle and children these days have weeks off.

My 2 cents
Were you driven to school in a Rolls Royce too ? I imagine walking there with broken legs would have been difficult.
[quote][p][bold]ShoeburyGuy17[/bold] wrote: I'm all in favour of the school banning the young man. As a youngster I was bullied beyond belief. I would be beaten up and even had my legs broken by the little critters. Because you've got 'asthma and get migraines' and Dyslexia, doesn't mean you have special treatment. I Had - 99.5% Attendance throughout the whole of my Secondary Education, 100% Primary and 100% in my A-level. I would be ill but go to the place of my education. A little sniffle and children these days have weeks off. My 2 cents[/p][/quote]Were you driven to school in a Rolls Royce too ? I imagine walking there with broken legs would have been difficult. muffindamule
  • Score: 0

9:04am Tue 15 May 12

bazaarhorse says...

There was a good chance he could miss the party with his attendance record anyhow. If Oliver's asthma really is bad I'm sorry, if he is just bunking off school, I'm not. Either way its not that big a deal but interesting what people have to say regarding a boy we know nothing about.
There was a good chance he could miss the party with his attendance record anyhow. If Oliver's asthma really is bad I'm sorry, if he is just bunking off school, I'm not. Either way its not that big a deal but interesting what people have to say regarding a boy we know nothing about. bazaarhorse
  • Score: 0

11:17am Tue 15 May 12

JonAbleton says...

I'd like to say that the comment about Learning Support team at the School, is rubbish. I went there for 7 years in total and while I didnt need to use those facilities, I do know that the facilities and staff are very good, assumuing the pupil is will to accept the support.
I'd like to say that the comment about Learning Support team at the School, is rubbish. I went there for 7 years in total and while I didnt need to use those facilities, I do know that the facilities and staff are very good, assumuing the pupil is will to accept the support. JonAbleton
  • Score: 0

11:58am Tue 15 May 12

JonAbleton says...

AndyBSG wrote:
And this story is a prime example of what is wrong with society and youth today. The sense of entitlement people have thinking they just automatically deserve good things in life handed on a plate to them is a joke. I can see him on here in a few years time complaining about how all his friends who've done their A-Levels and degrees have got well paid jobs while he is being victimised because he didn't turn up for college, so failed all his exams and now has to work for minimum wage. Besides, it's probably best he doesn't go to prom because if his asthma is so severe that he averaged more than 1 day a week off sick then imagine what all that dancing and dry ice would do too him...
Sadly, smoke machines and dry ice do not affect your breathing as they are little more that water vapour
[quote][p][bold]AndyBSG[/bold] wrote: And this story is a prime example of what is wrong with society and youth today. The sense of entitlement people have thinking they just automatically deserve good things in life handed on a plate to them is a joke. I can see him on here in a few years time complaining about how all his friends who've done their A-Levels and degrees have got well paid jobs while he is being victimised because he didn't turn up for college, so failed all his exams and now has to work for minimum wage. Besides, it's probably best he doesn't go to prom because if his asthma is so severe that he averaged more than 1 day a week off sick then imagine what all that dancing and dry ice would do too him...[/p][/quote]Sadly, smoke machines and dry ice do not affect your breathing as they are little more that water vapour JonAbleton
  • Score: 0

12:10pm Tue 15 May 12

Horace Wimpole says...

This is not news. NEXT!
This is not news. NEXT! Horace Wimpole
  • Score: 0

12:33pm Tue 15 May 12

The Cater Wood Creeper says...

has he started a faecebook page about it?
has he started a faecebook page about it? The Cater Wood Creeper
  • Score: 0

12:51pm Tue 15 May 12

Soouthchurch59 says...

Not even the promise of some 'Amber nectar' would have got me in that suit at the age of Fifteen!
Not even the promise of some 'Amber nectar' would have got me in that suit at the age of Fifteen! Soouthchurch59
  • Score: 0

12:52pm Tue 15 May 12

BIRLIS says...

I think the emphasis is the wrong way round. He isn't being punished by not being allowed to go, he just hasn't earned the bonus of going because he missed the target. A good life lesson. You need to perform to get extras. If you are sick, lazy, stupid or anything else you might not be penalised, but you will find it hard to earn the perks. Which is why they are perks.
I think the emphasis is the wrong way round. He isn't being punished by not being allowed to go, he just hasn't earned the bonus of going because he missed the target. A good life lesson. You need to perform to get extras. If you are sick, lazy, stupid or anything else you might not be penalised, but you will find it hard to earn the perks. Which is why they are perks. BIRLIS
  • Score: 0

12:52pm Tue 15 May 12

Soouthchurch59 says...

Not even the promise of some 'Amber nectar' would have got me in that suit at the age of Fifteen!
Not even the promise of some 'Amber nectar' would have got me in that suit at the age of Fifteen! Soouthchurch59
  • Score: 0

12:54pm Tue 15 May 12

Soouthchurch59 says...

Soouthchurch59 wrote:
Not even the promise of some 'Amber nectar' would have got me in that suit at the age of Fifteen!
Apologies re double post.
[quote][p][bold]Soouthchurch59[/bold] wrote: Not even the promise of some 'Amber nectar' would have got me in that suit at the age of Fifteen![/p][/quote]Apologies re double post. Soouthchurch59
  • Score: 0

2:31pm Tue 15 May 12

Steve H says...

Why does the Echo report it as the child being the victim? He isn't. He didn't go to school, 78% is shocking attendance, 63% is unexcusable.

The School is the victim, families like the one in the article are the ones that make school attendance records look poor and then attention from Ofsted.

I fully support the School in this case.
Why does the Echo report it as the child being the victim? He isn't. He didn't go to school, 78% is shocking attendance, 63% is unexcusable. The School is the victim, families like the one in the article are the ones that make school attendance records look poor and then attention from Ofsted. I fully support the School in this case. Steve H
  • Score: 0

3:28pm Wed 16 May 12

soph2606 says...

I think the newspapers need to stop printing the stories and giving the parents and children the attention they are craving! The school has had this policy for the past 8 years at least. The prom is put on as a reward for the students, so its only fair that it is taken away as a punishment. It's not a human right!
I think the newspapers need to stop printing the stories and giving the parents and children the attention they are craving! The school has had this policy for the past 8 years at least. The prom is put on as a reward for the students, so its only fair that it is taken away as a punishment. It's not a human right! soph2606
  • Score: 0

5:21pm Wed 16 May 12

al coniston says...

soph2606 wrote:
I think the newspapers need to stop printing the stories and giving the parents and children the attention they are craving! The school has had this policy for the past 8 years at least. The prom is put on as a reward for the students, so its only fair that it is taken away as a punishment. It's not a human right!
. . . and, of course, if you was 1 15 year old and all your friends were going out but you was told you can't at the 11th hour, you'd have just accepted it ?

As an adult, it's easy to reflect on these scenarios, but for impressionable youngsters of his age, it can sometimes be a little bit more difficult to accept, especially when everyone else is going but he is prevented from doing so.

This whole incident could have been handled better with a bit of common sense thus alleviating the associated resentment and upset.
[quote][p][bold]soph2606[/bold] wrote: I think the newspapers need to stop printing the stories and giving the parents and children the attention they are craving! The school has had this policy for the past 8 years at least. The prom is put on as a reward for the students, so its only fair that it is taken away as a punishment. It's not a human right![/p][/quote]. . . and, of course, if you was 1 15 year old and all your friends were going out but you was told you can't at the 11th hour, you'd have just accepted it ? As an adult, it's easy to reflect on these scenarios, but for impressionable youngsters of his age, it can sometimes be a little bit more difficult to accept, especially when everyone else is going but he is prevented from doing so. This whole incident could have been handled better with a bit of common sense thus alleviating the associated resentment and upset. al coniston
  • Score: 0

5:50pm Wed 16 May 12

The Cater Wood Creeper says...

it can sometimes be a little bit more difficult to accept, especially when everyone else is going but he is prevented from doing so.



a bit like his school attendance then....
[quote]it can sometimes be a little bit more difficult to accept, especially when everyone else is going but he is prevented from doing so. [/quote] a bit like his school attendance then.... The Cater Wood Creeper
  • Score: 0

5:52pm Wed 16 May 12

Steve H says...

al coniston wrote:
soph2606 wrote:
I think the newspapers need to stop printing the stories and giving the parents and children the attention they are craving! The school has had this policy for the past 8 years at least. The prom is put on as a reward for the students, so its only fair that it is taken away as a punishment. It's not a human right!
. . . and, of course, if you was 1 15 year old and all your friends were going out but you was told you can't at the 11th hour, you'd have just accepted it ?

As an adult, it's easy to reflect on these scenarios, but for impressionable youngsters of his age, it can sometimes be a little bit more difficult to accept, especially when everyone else is going but he is prevented from doing so.

This whole incident could have been handled better with a bit of common sense thus alleviating the associated resentment and upset.
I disagree al coniston.

This is the time he is taught life lessons, as he is, as you say, impressionable. Would this kind of absence be accepted in the workplace? No. Not with the excuses his parents have given in the article.
[quote][p][bold]al coniston[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]soph2606[/bold] wrote: I think the newspapers need to stop printing the stories and giving the parents and children the attention they are craving! The school has had this policy for the past 8 years at least. The prom is put on as a reward for the students, so its only fair that it is taken away as a punishment. It's not a human right![/p][/quote]. . . and, of course, if you was 1 15 year old and all your friends were going out but you was told you can't at the 11th hour, you'd have just accepted it ? As an adult, it's easy to reflect on these scenarios, but for impressionable youngsters of his age, it can sometimes be a little bit more difficult to accept, especially when everyone else is going but he is prevented from doing so. This whole incident could have been handled better with a bit of common sense thus alleviating the associated resentment and upset.[/p][/quote]I disagree al coniston. This is the time he is taught life lessons, as he is, as you say, impressionable. Would this kind of absence be accepted in the workplace? No. Not with the excuses his parents have given in the article. Steve H
  • Score: 0

6:35pm Wed 16 May 12

muffindamule says...

The Cater Wood Creeper wrote:
it can sometimes be a little bit more difficult to accept, especially when everyone else is going but he is prevented from doing so.



a bit like his school attendance then....
I can see what you've done there Cater Wood. Rather clever. Lol.

I had to google 'school prom' to find out what it actually is. Didn't have proms in my day. I found what I was looking for on Wikipedia and was initially shocked to read that

"At prom, a Prom Queen and Prom King may be revealed".

Nothing shocking in this of course unless one inadvertantly
reads P°rn instead of Prom as I did. I at first thought I'd found the reason for young Oliver's bitter disappointment. I wonder what Sigmund Freud would have made of that.
[quote][p][bold]The Cater Wood Creeper[/bold] wrote: [quote]it can sometimes be a little bit more difficult to accept, especially when everyone else is going but he is prevented from doing so. [/quote] a bit like his school attendance then....[/p][/quote]I can see what you've done there Cater Wood. Rather clever. Lol. I had to google 'school prom' to find out what it actually is. Didn't have proms in my day. I found what I was looking for on Wikipedia and was initially shocked to read that "At prom, a Prom Queen and Prom King may be revealed". Nothing shocking in this of course unless one inadvertantly reads P°rn instead of Prom as I did. I at first thought I'd found the reason for young Oliver's bitter disappointment. I wonder what Sigmund Freud would have made of that. muffindamule
  • Score: 0

10:32am Thu 17 May 12

rouliere says...

Beats me why he wants to go! With such poor attendance he won't know anyone - chances are they won't recognise him. He clearly isn't going to find breaking attachments to school difficult - if being part of school activities is so important it needs to start before the end of year 11!
Beats me why he wants to go! With such poor attendance he won't know anyone - chances are they won't recognise him. He clearly isn't going to find breaking attachments to school difficult - if being part of school activities is so important it needs to start before the end of year 11! rouliere
  • Score: 0

8:09pm Thu 17 May 12

Stoo says...

PJR121 wrote:
I have a friend who had bad asthma attacks - he managed to get through a school year fine - probably two weeks off if that.

Sorry, It doesn't wash with me. The school set rules, the boy didn't meet those rules, so he can't go. The parents were informed in Feburary that there was a problem and he may not be able to go too.

Instead they've run to the papers.

Echo - I didn't have a prom at my school when I left in 1998, can I be in the paper, as I didn't get a chance to go to one?
I didnt get one in 95 either, should we start a petition?
[quote][p][bold]PJR121[/bold] wrote: I have a friend who had bad asthma attacks - he managed to get through a school year fine - probably two weeks off if that. Sorry, It doesn't wash with me. The school set rules, the boy didn't meet those rules, so he can't go. The parents were informed in Feburary that there was a problem and he may not be able to go too. Instead they've run to the papers. Echo - I didn't have a prom at my school when I left in 1998, can I be in the paper, as I didn't get a chance to go to one?[/p][/quote]I didnt get one in 95 either, should we start a petition? Stoo
  • Score: 0

9:21pm Thu 17 May 12

Sign of the times says...

quote its every child's right to go to their prom, -


who said so?
quote its every child's right to go to their prom, - who said so? Sign of the times
  • Score: 0

9:57am Fri 18 May 12

CleverPoliticalSlogan says...

Dont worry Oliver you will be able to get suited and booted in the many court hearings i see in your future
Dont worry Oliver you will be able to get suited and booted in the many court hearings i see in your future CleverPoliticalSlogan
  • Score: 0

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